Multimedia Production




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Multimedia Production

Course Syllabus - Module 1
Renira Rampazzo Gambarato, PhD, Assistant Professor,

Faculty of Communications, Media and Design



1. ANNOTATION
Brief Description
The module 1 is a practical oriented course focusing on pragmatic aspects of transmedia content development. The course is structured as a collaborative environment to create transmedia stories. Under the supervision of the course instructor, students will work in groups throughout the module to plan a whole transmedia project and present it at the end.
In order to reach this goal, the course is organized to offer the students lectures and practical work sessions related to the following main topics: creative process, audience experience, and structure of transmedia project.

Methodology


The course methodology, in the context of media studies, consists of an interdisciplinary approach. More specifically, the course presents the original research developed by the course’s author dedicated to understand how complex transmedia narratives are planned and executed.
The course consists of lectures and practical work. The students will work in groups of five in order to develop all the course‘s activities. The course ends with the presentation of a whole tranemdia project plan.

Main goals of course - module 1


- To familiarize students with techniques, methods and process of practical development of transmedia narratives;

- To support the study of theories of transmedia narratives;

- To provide tools for the development of transmedia narratives;

- To creatively plan a whole transmedia project.


After successful completion of the course, the students will:
- Be aware of the specificities of transmedia narrative development as a creative process;

- Be aware of methods and techniques to develop transmedia narrativies;

- Have aquired first hand experiences of transmedia stories development;

- Have planned a transmedia production;

- Have acquired the knowledge to pitch a transmedia project;
Target audience
This is a compulsory course designed to provide MA level students from the Media Production in Creative Industries program (Department of Media) an in-depth experience on producing transmedia projects. The course is offered in English.

Requirements


In the module 1, it is necessary to have a working level of English in order to be able to fully participate in all activities of the course, which involves lectures, presentations, reading and writing. Attendance is also required.

2. COURSE STRUCTURE
Originality
The proposed course module 1 is the result of the recent academic research agenda of the author about transmedia storytelling complexity. The originality of the course lies on the specific approach to transmedia storytelling, going beyond multimedia production. In addition, the referred course offers both theoretical and practical experiences.

Course structure module 1





Topic

Total hours

Audience hours

Individual workload hours







Lectures

Practical work



1.

Creative process


8



6



0

10



2.

Transmedia project structure

30



10



0

20



3.

Transmedia project planning

42

2

10

30




Total

80

18

10

60




Class

Topic

1

1. Creative process: contiguity/similarity, non-traditional ways to tell a story

2

2. Transmedia project structure: getting started, selecting platforms

3

2. Transmedia project structure: audience, business model

4

3. Transmedia project planning: transmedia bible, pitch

5

3. Transmedia project planning: group presentations


3. COURSE CONTENT
The module 1 content is dedicated to understand how transmedia productions are planned, organized and executed. A transmedia story unfolds across multiple media platforms with each new text making a distinctive and valuable contribution to the whole. A transmedia narrative tells multiple stories over multiple platforms that together tell one big pervasive story, attracting audience engagement. It is not about offering the same content in different media platforms, but it is the worldbuilding experience, unfolding content and generating the possibilities for the story to evolve with new and pertinent content.

Gary Hayes, in his transmedia production bible (2011), organized a guide to the development of a property across multiple media platforms. He subdivided a transmedia project in five main sections and each of them has its specifics constituent elements. A transmedia production (supersystem) would involve, at least, five main areas (systems): a) Treatment; b) functional specification; c) design specification; d) technology specification; and e) business & marketing. Essentially the module 1 will explore story, experience, media platforms, audience, and business model dimensions of transmedia production. The students will apply the learned structure to plan their transmedia project.


Core sources (alphabetical order)
Bernardo, Nuno (2011). The Producers Guide to Transmedia: How to Develop, Fund, Produce and Distribute Compelling Stories Across Multiple Platforms. London: CR Entertainment Ltd.

Bernardo, Nuno (2014). Transmedia 2.0: How to Create an Entertainment Brand Using a Transmedial Approach to Storytelling. Lisbon: Beactive Books.

Bolin, Göran (2007). Media Technologies, Transmedia Storytelling and Commodification. In T. Storsul & D. Stuedahl (eds.). Ambivalence Towards Convergence. Digitalization and Media Change. Götenborg: Nordicom, 19-31.


Davidson, Drew et al. (2010). Cross-Media Communications: An Introduction to the Art of Creating Integrated Media Experiences. Pittsburgh: ETC Press.
Dena, Christy (2009). Transmedia Practice: Theorising the Practice of Expressing a Fictional World across Distinct Media and Environments. PhD Dissertation. University of Sydney.
Gambarato, Renira R. (2012). Signs, Systems and Complexity of Transmedia Storytelling. In Estudos em Comunicação, n.12, 69-83.
Gambarato, Renira R. (2013). Transmedia Project Design: Theoretical and Analytical Considerations. In Baltic Screen Media Review, n.1, 80-100.
Giovagnoli, Max (2011). Transmedia Storytelling: Imagery, Shapes and Techniques. Pittsburgh: ETC Press.
Gottschall, Jonathan (2013). The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make us Human. Boston: Mariner Books.
Hayes, Gary (2011). How to Write a Transmedia Producer Bible: A Template for Multi-Platform Producers. Sidney: Screen Australia.
Jenkins, Henry (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.
Jenkins, Henry; Ford, Sam and Green, Joshua (2013). Spreadable Media – Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. New York: NYU Press.
Kinder, Marsha (1991). Playing with Power in Movies, Television and Video Games: From Muppet Babies to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Miller, Carolyn H. (2004). Digital Storytelling: A Creator’s Guide to Interactive Entertainment. Burlington: Focal Press.
Phillips, Andrea (2012). A Creator's Guide to Transmedia Storytelling: How to Captivate and Engage Audiences across Multiple Platforms. New York: McGraw-Hill
Pratten, Robert (2011). Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. Seattle: CreateSpace.
Ryan, Marie-Laure (2004). Narrative across Media: The Language of Storytelling. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
Von Stackelberg, Peter (2011). Creating Transmedia Narratives: The Structure and Design of Stories Told Across Multiple Media. Master's Thesis. State University of New York. New York.
Additional sources (in alphabetical order)

Bogost, Ian; Ferrari, Simon and Schweizer, Bobby (2010). Newsgames: Journalism at Play. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Castells, Manuel (2002). The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business and Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


Evans, Elizabeth (2011). Transmedia Television: Audiences, New Media, and Daily Life. New York: Routledge.
Gambarato, Renira R. and Alzamora, Geane (2012). Transmedia Storytelling Initiatives in Brazilian Media. In Medien Journal – Zeitschrift für Kommunikationskultur, year 36, n. 4/2012, 51-62.
Harrington, Pat and Wardrip-Fruin, Noah (2009). Third Person: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Hartley, John and McWilliam, Kelly (eds.) (2009). Story Circle: Digital Storytelling around the World. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
Ibrus, Indrek and Scolari, Carlos A. (eds.) (2012). Crossmedia Innovations: Texts, Markets, Institutions. Berlin / New York: Peter Lang.
Manovich, Lev (2002). The Language of New Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Manovich, Lev (2013). Software Takes Command. New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
Marx, Christy (2007). Writing for Animation, Comics, and Games. Boston: Focal Press.
Murray, Janet (1997). Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Rose, Frank (2011). The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
3.1. Practical Work
The students, divided in six groups of five, will practice a transmedia development. Therefore, each group will function as a transmedia company and will select one existent media property (book, film, comic book, video game, etc.) that is not yet expanded across different media platforms, but has the potential to become a transmedia production. Based on the chosen media property, the group will transform it in a transmedia project.
Core sources (alphabetical order)
Hayes, Gary (2011). How to Write a Transmedia Producer Bible: A Template for Multi-Platform Producers. Sidney: Screen Australia.
Jenkins, Henry (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.
Pratten, Robert (2011). Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. Seattle: CreateSpace.

Additional sources (in alphabetical order)
Bernardo, Nuno (2011). The Producers Guide to Transmedia: How to Develop, Fund, Produce and Distribute Compelling Stories Across Multiple Platforms. London: CR Entertainment Ltd.

Bernardo, Nuno (2014). Transmedia 2.0: How to Create an Entertainment Brand Using a Transmedial Approach to Storytelling. Lisbon: Beactive Books.

Gambarato, Renira R. (2013). Transmedia Project Design: Theoretical and Analytical Considerations. In Baltic Screen Media Review, n.1, 80-100.


Phillips, Andrea (2012). A Creator's Guide to Transmedia Storytelling: How to Captivate and Engage Audiences across Multiple Platforms. New York: McGraw-Hill

Final Exam – Module 1


The final exam consists of the presentation in class of the transmedia project each group worked on. The complete instructions regarding the final exam are available on the author’s Web site: http://talkingobjects.org.
4. GRADING
Module 1 grading is based on three elements:

  • Attendance

  • Selection of the media property to become a transmedia production

  • Development of transmedia project = Final exam

The evaluation criteria of module 1 are:



  • Attendance: Participation in class

  • Selection of the media property: potential to become a transmedia production, attractiveness of the story

  • Development of transmedia project = Final exam: concept of the whole project, creativity of the solutions, level of details

Each grade is attributed according to 10-point scale and then is weighted according to the following percentage:




Attendance

25%

Selection of media property

25%

Development of transmedia project = Final exam

50%




Author, Assistant Professor Renira Rampazzo Gambarato, PhD


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