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POLICY NO DCI 13 - CL

Under Review




LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES AND
TECHNICAL NOTES FOR VARIOUS DEVELOPMENTS
POLICY
Date Resolved By Council: 14 December 1998
Commencement Date: 14 December 1998
Review Date: 2003 / 2004
Responsible Department: City Infrastructure

This policy has been authorised and is included on Council’s Website.


Peter Brown

Chief Executive Officer
April 2003

scope of the guide

This document applies to all developments which require a landscape plan to be submitted as part of a planning application. These include applications for multi unit developments, commercial and industrial sites where landscaping is required as part of the planning approval. The guidelines will also be used more generally to encourage a strong and distinct Moreland landscape across private and public land-holdings.


However where developments create a space available to the public, such as roads, car parks, plazas/forecourts and so on, Council would require the landscape plan to adopt the recommendations of the “Moreland Street Landscape Strategy, (1997)”.

Introduction

The character and attractiveness of the City of Moreland depend on the quality of its built and natural environment. Moreland’s Corporate Plan and Municipal Strategic Statement both place considerable emphasis on the conservation and improvement of the environment.


Council is committed to achieving a high standard of design, development, and management of its public landscapes, streets and open spaces. It is also keen to encourage developers to provide quality landscapes that contribute to the built and natural character and sustainability of the city.
The private garden is a component of the streetscape and the natural environment.


Purpose

The purpose of this document is to:




  • Encourage the development of quality landscapes associated with new development.




  • Identify Council’s policy and aims regarding municipal planting theme and design principles that are important for a quality outcome.




  • Assist in the documentation and submission of landscape plans so as to ensure efficient and quick processing of planning applications.




  • Identify a selection of tree species for planting in private gardens and landscapes.

municipal planting scheme

The Moreland Street Landscape Strategy aims to create a strong municipal planting theme through the use of local native trees. This planting will establish a unique Moreland character whilst providing habitat benefits and attracting native bird life.

Moreland City Council aims to encourage and enhance this planting theme into the private gardens of new developments.
Note:- The Moreland Street Landscape Strategy is available at Council offices for viewing.

DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR PLANTING IN MORELAND

Local Area Character

Council is keen to enrich the qualities of the city by encouraging private landscape developments that consider and complement local area character and streetscape.


The most important factors of the private gardens that affect local area character are:


  • Fence type,




  • Plant species and planting patterns, and




  • Materials and colours, including paving.

Fences, especially the front fence and gates, should generally have a height, scale, structural articulation, materials and colours that respond to the overall scale and proportions of the street and streetscape. A fence should be a simple complement to the building and provide for an active frontage to the street.


Plant Selection
Plant species and planting patterns should add to the streetscape image of the area, especially where the private garden is visible from the street:


  • Local, indigenous vegetation is the principal theme in Moreland’s open space development and streetscape strategy. Species selection and plant grouping should be environmentally and ecologically appropriate and strengthen existing and establishing vegetation stands and patterns in the public realm. In particular, private gardens in areas along creek corridors and open space should be sensitively treated.




  • Regionally local native plants should be the first choice. These areas provide opportunities to build ecological corridors across the city. Species selection and planting patterns should follow from the local growing conditions and relate to the scale and proportions of the street and the built elements in the area. A list of regionally local native plants is provided in these guidelines.

Materials and colours of landscape structures and surfaces should make a positive contribution to the streetscape and not detract from its quality.


Natural Ecosystems

Moreland’s natural ecosystems have been put under severe pressure by the growth and development of the city. Their protection and restoration is a priority of Council. Much work has been done already to restore natural systems along the Merri, Moonee Ponds, Merlynston, Edgars, and Westbreen Creeks. Council encourages residents, developers and land owners to contribute to increasing the incidence of indigenous plants. This is seen as a way of encouraging native bird life back to the municipality.


Important measures in the protection and restoration of local vegetation in private landscapes are:




  • Identification of any remnant, indigenous vegetation,




  • Retention of remnant vegetation including groups and single plants,




  • Removal and control of environmental weeds, and




  • Selection of local, indigenous species for complementary planting.

Environmentally Sustainable Landscape Design

Council is committed to an environmentally sustainable city. It encourages innovative landscape solutions to conserve water and energy and reduce waste in all private gardens.


Measures for water conservation in the private gardens include:


  • Selection of plants suited to local climatic and growing conditions,




  • Recirculation of water within the site, and,




  • Design of site drainage to benefit vegetation on the site.

Measures for energy conservation in the private gardens include:




  • Use of materials produced from renewable resources only, and




  • Selection of plants and planting patterns that contribute to the solar efficiency of the building.

Measures for waste reduction in the private landscape include:




  • Design for and implementation of composting and mulching to return local nutrients to the soil.


Landscape Designer
Landscape plans associated with planning permit applications must be competent and well considered, prepared by a suitably qualified landscape designer.


  • Landscape Architects are corporate members of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA).




  • Other professional designers with a degree in horticulture or urban design and relevant professional experience may also be adequately qualified and approved by Council to undertake landscape design.

Council encourages developers to involve the landscape designer in the development project from the earliest possible stage to ensure proper consideration of landscape factors and to contribute to a sustainable, cost-effective outcome.



Designing Landscapes

Council wishes to encourage landscape developments that consider and complement the use and design of the associated buildings.


The amenity and identity of a private landscape and garden depend on its usefulness and aesthetic quality. The private landscape should have:


  • A pattern of use that complements the use of the buildings and differentiates between various activities and functions,




  • A layout that relates to the layout of the buildings, provides for the extension of internal activities outdoors and makes good use of the site,




  • Convenient and safe access into and within the site,




  • A style that relates to the architecture of the buildings including forms, materials, details and finishes,




  • A scale that relates to the proportions of the building and the site, and




  • A planting concept that complements the use and form of the buildings.

Planning ApplicationS - the process

Processing times for planning applications depend on the adequacy and accuracy of the documentation. Council encourages developers to check that applications include all required documentation and that the documents include all required information and thoroughly describe the proposed works.


Planning permit applications for landscape works should include:


  • A detailed landscape plan




  • Landscape schedule outlining plant species, densities and numbers;




  • And where requested, a statement explaining the landscape design.


SITE ANALYSIS

Site analysis forms the basis of the landscape design. The Victorian Government’s Good Design Guide for Medium-Density Housing requires a site analysis for multi-unit developments and Council strongly recommends it for all other developments in Moreland as well.


Site analysis is a part of the site designs process. It should clearly show the existing conditions, opportunities, and constraints on the site and the immediately adjoining sites and streets.
Factors such as sun orientation, soil condition and purpose of the open space all influence the landscape design and selection of flora.

Factors which should be considered prior to designing landscape are:


Subject Site


  • Geology, contours and existing native and significant exotic vegetation;




  • The design, layout and location of the building (including habitable room windows);




  • Views to and from the site;




  • Vehicular and pedestrian access;




  • Drainage and services;




  • Solar access (including winter sun and summer sun), orientation and noise sources;




  • Fences, boundaries and easements;


Surrounding Area


  • The location of the adjoining buildings and the habitable room windows;




  • Abutting private open space;




  • Nearby public open space;




  • Views and solar access enjoyed by adjacent property owners and parkland users;




  • Major trees on adjacent properties;




  • Street frontage features, such as street trees, poles, paving etc;




  • Built form and character of the surrounding streetscape and development, including fencing and garden styles.



Documentation

A landscape plan should:




  • Be drawn to scale, preferable at 1:100 or 1:200.




  • Not larger than A1 in size.




  • Show site and building layout and boundaries, including the ground floor plan of all buildings on the site showing the location of doors and windows fencing.




  • Designate and identify the areas to be set aside as lawn, pavement or garden beds.




  • Graphically identify the proposed trees, group of shrubs, areas of ground covers and climber locations and existing vegetation to be retained.




  • Indicate management plan for any indigenous vegetation being retained.




  • Provide a plant schedule which is a list of the proposed plants, plant density and the total numbers required.




  • Identify type and design of materials to be used, such as paving, railway sleepers, pergolas, seating, fencing, fountains etc.




  • Include plan title, property address, date of drawing, scale and north point.

For large scale developments and for developments in environmentally sensitive locations, a landscape design statement will be required. The landscape design statement should be a brief written document that clearly explains the design principles and justifies the proposed landscape development, especially in relation to:




  • Local area character including the selection of fence type, plant species, materials and colours,




  • Natural ecosystems, and




  • Environmentally sustainable design.

Recommended Species

The recommended species list provides a basis for flora selection . The species list includes local native, non-local native and exotic plants which are aligned to the growing conditions of Moreland. Preference is given to planting indigenous (local native) vegetation of local provenance.


In selecting native plants, priority has been given to plants that will grow well in the local environment and complement the local native species in terms of design, function and habitat.

A number of exotic species have been included in the plant list. This has been done to increase horticultural choice in unusual landscape circumstances where it is considered unlikely Moreland’s indigenous woodland plants will establish. For example, in micro-sites that may be in permanent shade.

In normal circumstances, the majority of plants selected must be from the indigenous list.

Plant List

Note: The following list of plants should be used in conjunction with comments under ‘Plant Selection” on Page 2 of these guidelines.




REGIONALLY LOCAL NATIVE PLANTS










Botanical Name

Common Name

H

W

Large Trees > 10 metres










Acacia dealbata

Silver Wattle

10 - 20

4 - 8

Acacia melanoxyon

Blackwood

8 - 15

5 - 10

Eucalyptus camaldulensis


River Red Gum

15 - 25

10 - 20

Eucalyptus leucoxylon ssp. connata

Yellow Gum

10 - 15

5 - 10

Eucalyptus macrorhyncha

Red Stringybark

10 - 35

10 - 20

Eucalyptus melliodora

Yellow Box

15 - 25

10 - 20

Eucalyptus microcarpa

Grey Box

15 - 25

10 - 15

Eucalyptus ovata

Swamp Gum

8 - 12

5 - 10

Eucalyptus polyanthemos ssp. vestita

Red Box

10 - 15

6 - 10

Eucalyptus viminalis

Manna Gum

15 - 25

10 - 20













Small Trees <10 metres










Acacia implexa

Lightwood

6 - 8

4 - 8

Acacia pycnantha

Golden Wattle

3 - 10

2 - 5

Allocasuarina littoralis

Black Sheoke

5 - 8

2 - 5

Allocasuarina verticillata

Drooping Sheoke

6 - 8

4 - 6

Banksia marginata

Silver Banksia

8

3

Bursaria spinosa var. spinosa

Sweet Bursaria

4 - 8

3 - 6

Callitris glaucophylla

White Cypress-pine

5 - 8

4 - 6

Hymenanthera dentata

Tree Violet

3

2

Leptospermum lanigerum

Wooly Tea-tree

5

2

Leptospermum obovatum

River Tea-tree

3

1.5

Pomaderris aspera

Hazel Pomaderris

3 - 10

2 - 4













Shrubs










Acacia acinaceae

Gold-dust Wattle

.5 - 2.5

2 - 4

Acacia paradoxa

Hedge Wattle

2 - 4

2 - 5

Acacia verticillata

Prickly Moses

2 - 6

3 - 5

Callistemmon sieberi

River Bottlebrush

3 - 8

2 - 5

Correa glabra

Rock Correa

1 - 3

1 - 3

Correa reflexa

Common Correa

0.3 - 2

1 - 2

Dodonaea viscosa ssp. spatulata

Wedge-leaf Hop Bush

1 - 3

1 - 3

Goodenia ovata

Hop Goodenia

1 - 2.5

1 - 3

Grevillea rosmarinifolia

Rosemary Grevillea

1 - 3

2 - 3

Gynatrix pulchella

Hemp Bush

2 - 4

1.5 - 3

Kunzea ericoides

Burgan

2 - 5

2 - 4

Myoporum insulare

Boobialla

1 - 5

1 - 3

Myoporum viscosum

Sticky Boobialla

0.5 - 2

1.5 - 2

Rhagodia parabolica

Fragrant Saltbush

0.5 - 2

.5 - 1.5

Solanum aviculare

Kangaroo Apple

1 - 3

1 - 4

Viminria juncea

Native Broom

2 - 5

2














Groundcovers and Wildflowers










Atriplex semibaccata

Creeping Saltbush

.1 - .3

1 – 3

Brachyscome cardiocarpa

Swamp Daisy

.3

.3

Brachyscome multifida var. multifida

Cut Leaf Daisy

.4

.2 – 1

Calocephalus citreus

Lemon Beauty Heads

.5

.3 – 1

Calocephalus lacteus

Milky beauty Heads

.3

.3 - .5

Carpobrotus modestus

Pigface

prostrate

1 – 3

Chrysocephalum apiculatum

Common Everlasting

.3

1 – 2

Craspedia variabilis

Billy Buttons

.3

.5

Dichondra repens

Kidney Weed

prostrate

Enchylaena tomentosa

Ruby Salybush

.1 – 1

.5 – 1

Helichrysum scorpioides

Button Everlasting

.3

.3

Kennedia prostrata

Running Postman

.1

1 – 2.5

Myoporum parvifolium

Creeping Boobialla

.1

2 – 4

Pelargonium australe

Australs Stork’s-bill

.3 - .6

.3 – 1

Pelargonium rodneyanum

Magenta Stork’s-bill

.3

.5

Podolepis jaceoides

Showy Podolepis

.3 - .6

.3

Pratia pedunculata

Matted Pratia

.1

2 – 3

Veronica gracilis

Slender Speedwell

.3

1

Viola hederacae

Native Violet

.15

1 – 2

Wahlenbergia communis

Tufted Bluebell

.5

.15

Wahlenbergia stricta

Tall Bluebell

.4 - .9

.3 - .5













Tussock Plants










Carex appressa

Tall Sedge

.5 – 1

.5 – 1

Carex breviculmis

Short-stem Sedge

.15




Danthonia duttoniana

Brown-back Wallaby Grass

.4

.5

Danthonia setaceae var. setaceae

Bristly Wallaby Grass

.3

.5

Dianella longifolia var. longifolia

Smooth Flax-lily

.3 - .8

.5

Dianella revoluta var. revoluta

Black Anther Flax-lily

.3 – 1

.5 – 2.5

Dicanthium sericeum

Silky Blue-grass

.3 - .5




Gahnia radula

Thatch Saw-sedge

1 – 2

.5 – 2

Isolepis nodosa

Knobby Club-rush

.5 – 1.5

.6 – 2

Lomandra filiformis ssp. filiformis

Wattle Mat-rush

.1 - .5

.1 - .2

Lomandra longifolia

Spiny-headed Mat-rush

.5 – 1

.5 – 1

Poa labillardieri

Common Tussock Grass

.5 – 1




Poa morrisii

Velvet Tussock Grass

.3

.3

Stipa elegantissima

Feather Spear-grass

.5 - .8




Stipa semibarbata

Fibrous Spear-grass

.3 – 1




Stylidium graminifolium var. graminifolium

Grass Trigger-plant

.2 - .6

.2 - .3

Themeda triandra

Kangaroo Grass

.4 – 1

.5













Climbers










Clematis aristata

Old Man’s Beard

5 – 15




Clematis microphylla

Small-leafed Clematis

5 – 10




Hardenbergia violaceae

Purple Coral Pea

1 – 2





NON-LOCAL NATIVE PLANTS










Botanical Name

Common Name

H

W

Tall Trees > 10 metres










Allocasuarina luehmannii

Bull Oak

5 - 15

5 - 10

Allocasuarina torulosa

Rose She-oke

10 - 15

4 - 6

Angophora costata

Smooth-bark Apple-myrtle

10 - 15

5 - 10

Eucalyptus tricarpa (sideroxylon)

Red Ironbark

15 - 20

10 - 20

Ficus microcarpa var. hilli

Hills Weeping Fig

10 - 15

5 - 10

Lophostemon confertus

Brush Box

10 - 15

4 - 8













Small Trees <10 metres










Agonis flexuosa

Willow Myrtle

6 - 8

5 - 8

Callistemon salignus

Willow Bottlebrush

5 - 8

3 - 5

Eucalyptus caesia

Gungurru

5 - 8

2 - 4

Eucalyptus macranda

Long-flowered Marlock

4 - 6

5 - 8

Eucalyptus torquata

Coral Gum

5 - 8

4 - 6

Melia azerarach var australasica

White Cedar

5 - 8

4 - 5

Tristaniopsis laurina

Kanooka

5 - 8

3 - 5













Shrubs










Acacia iteaphylla

Gawler Range Wattle

3 - 5

3 - 6

Acacia retinoides

Wirilda

4 - 7

3 - 4

Banksia ericifolia

Heath Banksia

2 - 5

1 - 2

Calothamnus quadrifidus

Common Net Bush

1.5 - 3

1.5 - 3

Correa baeuerlenii

Chefs Cap Correa

1 - 1.5

1 - 1.5

Westringia fruticosa

Native Rosemary

1.5

1













Groundcovers and Forbs










Dampiera linearis

Common Dampiera

prostrate

1

Leucophyta brownii

Cushion Bush

.5 - 1

1 - 2

Pratia pedunculata




prostrate

1 - 2

Rhagodia spinescens




.4 - .6

1 - 1.5













Tussock Plants










Anigozanthus bicolor

Little Kangaroo Paw

.3 - .6

.3 - .8

Dianella tasmanica

Tasmanian Flax Lily

.5 - 1.5

.5 - 2

Diplarrena moroea

Butterfly Flag

.1 - .9

.1 - 1

Orthrosanthus multiflorus




1 - 1.5

1 - 1.5

Patersonia occidentalis

Purple Flag

.3 - .6

.3 - .6

Restio tetraphyllus

Tassel Cord-rush

1 - 1.2

.6 - 1













Climbers










Kennedia macrophylla




6

6

Kennedia nigricans

Black Coral Pea

6

6

Pandorea pandorana

Wonga Wonga Vine

10

10














NON-INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS









Botanical Name


Common Name

H

W

Large Trees > 10 metres










Alnus jorullensis

Evergreen Alder

6 - 12

3 - 6

Michelia doltsopa

Chinese Magnolia Tree

3 - 15

1 - 5

Quercus suber

Cork Oak

6 - 12

4 - 6













Small Trees < 10 metres










Lagerstroemia indica

Crepe Myrtle

2 - 5

1 - 3

Metrosideros excelsa

New Zealand Christmas Tree

5 - 10

2 - 4

Olea europaea var. europaea

European Olive

5 - 10

4 - 8













Shrubs










Coleonema album

White Diosma

.6 - 1.2

.6 - 1.2

Spirea cantoniensis

Reeves Spirea

1.5 - 2

1 - 1.5













Groundcovers and Forbs










Coprosma x kirkii




.4 - .6




Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary

.5 - 1

1 - 1.5













Climbers










Ficus pumila

Creeping Fig







Parthenocissus tricuspidata

Boston Ivy







Wisteria sinensis

Chinese Wisteria

15 - 20

15 - 20


Expanded Descriptions of Large Trees from each of the three categories (with illustration of mature form)

Local Native Trees



Acacia dealbata

Common Name: Silver Wattle

Size: Height 10 - 20m x Width 4 - 8

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 - 0.9m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Acacia dealbata is a large evergreen tree that is easily grown, adaptable to a wide range of soil types, preferring moist soils. It will grow in dappled shade, partial or full sun. Host to the Imperial Blue Butterfly caterpillar when less than 3m tall. Bluish-green bipinnate leaves and profuse lemon flowers July to October.
Acacia melanoxylon

Common Name: Blackwood

Size: Height 8 - 15 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Slow: 0.3 - 0.6m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Acacia melanoxylon is a long-lived large evergreen tree with dull green phyllodes and cream to pale yellow flowers July to October. Prefers deep moist soils but adaptable, tolerating dryness once established. Dappled shade to full sun.
Eucalyptus camaldulensis

Common Name: River Red Gum

Size: Height 15 - 20 x Width 10 - 20

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus camaldulensis is a large evergreen tree of spreading form with narrow leaves and profuse white flowers November to March. Prefers deep soils and tolerates dry periods once established. Excellent habitat tree at maturity.
Eucalyptus leucoxylon ssp. connata

Common Name: Yellow Gum

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.5 1.0m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus leucoxylon ssp. connata is a large evergreen tree of variable form with long, narrow olive-green to green pendulous leaves and profuse cream to white flowers May to September. Prefers heavy soils but is very adaptable, tolerating drought once established. Highly regarded for honey production.
Eucalyptus macrorhyncha

Common Name: Red Stringybark

Size: Height 10 - 35 x Width 10 - 20

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 -0.9m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus macrorhyncha is a large sized upright tree with a rounded canopy. It has glossy leaves and profuse white to cream flowers January to April with a pervasive honey aroma, the red-brown bark is deeply fissured. Prefers a well drained clay loam soil, not tolerant of wet soils.

Eucalyptus melliodora

Common name: Yellow Box

Size: Height 15 - 25 x Width 10 - 20

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus melliodora is a large evergreen variable open to dense tree with narrow leaves light green to greyish or blue, flowers perfumed cream to white, September to March. Soils need to be well-drained loams and alluvial. Excellent honey tree with a spreading, drooping canopy.
Eucalyptus microcarpa

Common Name: Grey Box

Size: Height 15 - 25 x Width 10 - 15

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus microcarpa is a large spreading tree with an open canopy. Leaves narrow dull green, flowers white February to August. Good honey tree, requiring heavy soils, tolerating wet winters and dry summers.
Eucalyptus ovata

Common Name: Swamp Gum

Size: Height 8 - 12 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 -0.9m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus ovata is a medium to tall tree with open to moderately dense canopy. Shiny broad leaves with wavy edges, flowers white to cream March to June. Does well in poorly drained soils but also grows in well-drained soils. Useful shade tree for swampy areas and creek banks. Leaves are eaten by koalas.
Eucalyptus polyanthemos ssp. vestita

Common Name: Red Box

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width 6 - 10

Growth rate: Slow: 0.3 - 0.6m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus polyanthemos ssp. vestita a small to medium evergreen tree with attractive blue-grey rounded leaves and profuse white flowers September to January which attract nectar eating birds. Will tolerate poor soils as long as drainage is good.
Eucalyptus viminalis

Common Name: Manna Gum

Size: Height 15 - 25 x Width 10 - 20

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of origin: Local native

Eucalyptus viminalis is a large evergreen upright tree with an open spreading canopy. Dark green sickle-shaped leaves and white flowers January to May. Adaptable to a wide range of soils this tree is very ornamental with white trunk, clean branches and shedding bark. Leaves are an important koala food and the flowers a source of nectar and pollen for bees.

Non-Local Natives Trees



Allocasuarina luehmannii

Common Name: Bull Oak

Size: Height 5 - 15 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.5 - 0.8m per year

Place of origin: Local native

Allocasuarina luehmannii is an evergreen upright tree with fine dull green branchlets. It has yellow spikes on male trees March to October. Adaptable to a wide range of heavy soils, filtered to full sun.
Allocasuarina torulosa

Common Name: Rose She-oke

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width: 4 - 6

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 - 0.9m per year

Place of Origin: Qld, NSW

Allocasuarina torulosa is a slender upright or spreading evergreen tree with deeply furrowed bark. Grey-green branchlets take on a rusty to dark brown appearance when in flower. Branches frequently weep when young, adaptable to a wide range of soils types and conditions.
Angophora costata

Common Name: Smooth-bark Apple-myrtle

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 - 0.9m per year

Place of Origin: Qld, NSW

Angophora costata is a small to medium evergreen tree with an upright form with a relatively open canopy. The leaves are large and bright green, with reddish new growth. The flowers are white to cream and profuse through summer, bark smooth and bright orange brown to pink-brown when new. Will grow in a wide range of soil conditions.
Eucalyptus tricarpa

Common Name: Red Ironbark

Size: Height 15 - 20 X Width 10 - 20

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of Origin: Victoria

Eucalyptus tricarpa is a large upright to spreading tree with an open crown. The bark is persistent on trunk and branches, hard, very thick, deeply furrowed, reddish brown to black. The leaves long dull green to grey, profuse cream or pink flowers May to December, very attractive to nectar eating birds. Requires well drained soils and tolerates extended dry periods when established.
Ficus microcarpa var. hilli

Common Name: Hills Weeping Fig

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width 5 - 10

Growth rate: Slow: 0.3 - 0.6m per year

Place of Origin: Qld

Ficus microcarpa var. hilli is a medium sized evergreen tree leathery dark green leaves. At maturity the tree forms a bushy habit with weeping branches. The tree clips well to form large hedges or pleached avenue plantings. The bark is white which contrasts with the foliage.


Lophostemon confertus


Common Name: Brush Box

Size: Height 10 - 15 x Width 4 - 8

Growth rate: Moderately fast: 0.6 - 0.9m per year

Place of Origin: NSW, Qld



Lophostemon confertus is a medium sized evergreen tree forming a dense rounded crown. The leaves are a dark green, reddish when young, profuse white flowers in late spring to early summer. The compact form is unusual for native trees, tolerates a wide range of soil conditions.

Exotic Trees



Alnus jorullensis

Common Name: Evergreen Alder

Size: Height 6 - 12 x Width 3 - 6

Growth rate: Fast: 0.9m plus per year

Place of Origin: Mexico

Alnus jorullensis is an upright pyramidal evergreen tree with pendudlous deep green foliage. Bark is papery and pale grey. Tolerates a wide range of soil conditions.
Michelia doltsopa

Common Name: Chinese Magnolia Tree

Size: Height 3 - 15 x Width 1 - 5

Growth rate: Slow: 0.3 - 0.6m per year

Place of Origin: China

Michelia doltsopa is a very ornamental evergreen tree with glossy leaves and fragrant white flowers. The tree requires well drained soil, not tolerant of drought.
Quercus suber

Common Name: Cork Oak

Size: Height 6 - 12 x Width 4 - 6

Growth rate: Slow: 0.3 - 0.5m per year

Place of Origin: N. Africa, Europe

Quercus suber is an upright evergreen tree with glossy dark green leaves. The attractive bark is the commercial source for cork. The tree is tolerant of dry soils once established.

REFERENCE Materials

The Moreland Open Space Strategy; 1996


The Moreland Street Landscape Strategy, 1997
Merri Creek and Environs Strategy, 1998
Moonee Ponds Creek Concept Plan, 1992
Field Guide to Victoria’s Native Grasslands, 1992, National Trust
Plants of Melbourne’s Western Plains - A gardener’s guide to the original flora, 1995, SGAP Keilor Plains Group
Plants of the Merri Merri - A Home Gardener’s Guide to Using Indigenous Plants in the Northern Suburbs of Melbourne, 1994, Merri Creek Management Committee
Flora of Melbourne - A Guide to the Indigenous Plants of the Greater Melbourne Area, 1993, Society for Growing Australian Plants Maroondah, Inc.
Native Trees and Shrubs of South-Eastern Australia, 1989, L. F. Costermans
Gardening with Indigenous Plants in Moreland, 1998 (Moreland City Council)



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