Russian Literature Week




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Russian Literature Week

14-20 April 2008

all events are in English and Russian
Over 100 leading Russian writers, publishers, critics and laureates of literary prizes in London to participate in discussions representing the new Russian intellectual frontier. it is an opportunity to hear the views of distinguished Russian intellectuals directly

BOOKS FROM RUSSIA – Russian Publishers’ Stand

14-16 April, London Book Fair, Stand X505, Earls Court, London

The first ever Russian stand at the London Book Fair will present books and publishing programmes of 20 leading publishers from St Petersburg and Moscow as well as a continuous 3-day programme of debates on contemporary Russian culture, politics and the future of Russo-British relations.

For the full programme visit www.academia-rossica.org

Translating Russia: 50th anniversary of Doctor Zhivago

Monday, 14 April, 7 pm

Royal Society of Literature, Courtauld Institute, Somerset House, Strand

Dmitry Bykov, winner of the Big Book prize, speaks about his new biography of Boris Pasternak and life in Stalin’s Russia. Elaine Feinstein and Professors Jon Stallworthy and Angela Livingstone speak about their own involvement with Pasternak over many years. (£5 donation)


Beyond Moscow: New Russian Literature in the Provinces

Monday, 14 April, 8 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, 8 pm, FREE

Discovering brilliant new writing in Russia’s expanses. Speakers: Olga Slavnikova, winner of the Russian Booker Prize 2006, Natalia Ivanova, literary critic, Irina Prokhorova, NLO publisher, Ravil Bukharaev, BBC correspondent, poet and translator, and Alexander Gavrilov, editor in chief of the “Knizhnoe obozrenie” (Book Review)


Grants for Translation of Contemporary Russian Literature into English

Tuesday, 15 April, 1 pm

Russian Stand (X505), London Book Fair, Earls Court, London

Launch of the programme established by Academia Rossica and The Yeltsin Foundation, aiming to promote new Russian writing internationally


James Meek: Price of the Prize

Tuesday, 15 April, 6.30 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, £3

Prize-winning writer James Meek discusses the blessings and dangers of literary prizes with 4 Russian prize-winning writers: Dmitry Bykov, winner of the Big Book prize 2007, Alexander Ilichevsky, winner of the Russian Booker Prize 2007, Olga Slavnikova, winner of the Russian Booker Prize 2006, and Lev Rubinstein, winner of the Andrei Bely Prize.

In English and Russian
Russia: Dialectics of Hope

Tuesday, 15 April, 8 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, FREE

Lev Rubinstein, winner of the prestigious Andrey Bely Prize (1 rouble and a bottle of vodka), poet and writer, in conversation with Zinovy Zinik, London-based writer and BBC broadcaster

In English and Russian
Russia and its History: Myths and Realities

Wednesday, 16 April, 6.30 pm

MacDougall Arts, 30A Charles Street (off Lower Regent Street), London SW1Y

Sergey Mironenko, Director of the State Russian Archives, will be talking about myths and mysteries of Russian and Soviet history and fascinating documents kept in the archives. He will be discussing with Norman Stone, Professor of international politics, and Francine-Dominique Liechtenhan, Professor of Russian history at Sorbonne, how these discoveries change our perception of Russia’s history. In English and Russian


The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia

Wednesday, 16 April, 6.30 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, £3

Orlando Figes, historian and award winning writer, discusses his latest book “The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia” with Alexander Ilichevsky, winner of the Russian Booker Prize 2007 and editor of Radio Svoboda


Boris Pasternak and others – Bulgakov, Akhmatova, Mandelshtam … and Stalin.

Wednesday, 16 April, 8 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, FREE

Natalia Ivanova, the authoritative biographer of Pasternak, presents a documentary film about one of the greatest Russian writers of the last century


Dmitry A. Prigov – Russian Dante of the 21st century

Thursday, 17 April, 6.30 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, £3

A portrait of one of the most influential Russian writers in the contemporary European cultural context , presented by Irina Prokhorova (New Literary Observer), Professor Alexander Pyatigorsky and Andrei & Nadezhda Prigov. (with video)


Contemporary Russian Poetry

Thursday, 17 April, 8 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, FREE

Poetry readings by Russian poets, introduced by Valentina Polukhina.


The Ties of Blood

Russian Literature from the 21st Century

Friday, 18 April, 6.30 pm

Waterstone’s Piccadilly, 5th Floor, £3

Oliver Ready, translator and scholar in Russian literature, presents his anthology of contemporary Russian writing and discusses it with two featured writers – Dmitry Bykov and Alexander Ilichavsky.




Films
Apollo West End Cinema, Lower Regent Street, Piccadilly

Info/Booking : 0871 220 6000

All films are in Russian with English subtitles


Crime & Punishment /1972/

Saturday, 19 April, Part 1 – 1 pm, Part 2 – 3.30 pm

Dir: Lev Kulidzhanov. This atmospheric psychological drama brilliantly conveys the complexity of the great literary work through outstanding acting, set design and direction. Undoubtedly the most successful adaptation of the great Dostoyevsky’s novel.


Cruel Romance /1984/

Saturday, 19 April, Part 1 – 6 pm, Part 2 – 8.30 pm

Dir: Eldar Ryazanov. Based on Ostrovsky’s play Bespridannitsa (Without Endowery), the film tells a tragic love story between a young beautiful, yet poor, Larissa, and a seductive ruthless aristocrat, Sergei Paratov. The film features some outstanding performances by Nikita Mikhalkov, Alexei Petrenko, Alisa Freindlich, and, of course, Larisa Guzeeva in her very first leading role.


War and Peace /1968/
Sunday, 20 April, Part 1 – 13:00; Part 2 – 15:30; Part 3 – 18:30

Dir: Sergei Bondarchuk. A stunning, Oscar-winning epic. Directed by one of the greatest Russian filmmakers, Sergei Bondarchuk, this screen adaptation is worthy of its ingenious literary original.



One of the most expensive Soviet productions, the film took 7 years to produce and cost over $100 million. It became the first soviet Oscar winning film in 1969.



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