Review of a google android os




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REVIEW OF A GOOGLE ANDROID OS

Cechetov D., gr. SU-91

Android, Inc. was founded in Palo Alto, California, United States in October, 2003 by Andy Rubin, Rich Miner, et al. to develop, in Rubin's words "...smarter mobile devices that are more aware of its owner's location and preferences." Key employees involved in the founding of Android Inc. include Andy Rubin, also the co-founder of Danger Inc., Andy McFadden, who worked with Rubin at WebTV, and Chris White, who led the design and interface of WebTV. Other crucial employees includes Richard Miner, a co-founder of Wildfire Communications, Inc. and former vice-president of Technology and innovation at Orange, and all those of whom brought considerable wireless industry experience to the company. Despite the obvious past accomplishments of the founders and early employees, Android Inc. operated secretively, admitting only that it was working on software for mobile phones. Google acquired Android Inc. in August, 2005, making Android Inc. a wholly-owned subsidiary of Google Inc. Key employees of Android Inc., including Andy Rubin, Rich Miner and Chris White, stayed at the company after the acquisition.

The Android OS can be used as an operating system for cellphones, netbooks and tablets, including the Dell Streak, Samsung Galaxy Tab, TV and other devices.[62][63] The first commercially available phone to run the Android operating system was the HTC Dream, released on 22 October 2008.[64] In early 2010 Google collaborated with HTC to launch its flagship[65] Android device, the Nexus One. This was followed later in 2010 with the Samsung-made Nexus S. Research company Canalys estimated in Q2 2009 that Android had a 2.8% share of worldwide smartphone shipments By Q4 2010 this had grown to 33% of the market, becoming the top-selling smartphone platform. This estimate includes the Tapas and OMS variants of Android. In February 2010 ComScore said the Android platform had 9.0% of the U.S. smartphone market, as measured by current mobile subscribers. This figure was up from an earlier estimate of 5.2% in November 2009.[136] By the end of Q3 2010 Android's U.S. market share had grown to 21.4 percent. In May 2010, Android's first quarter U.S. sales surpassed that of the rival iPhone platform. According to a report by the NPD group, Android achieved 25% smartphone sales in the US market, up 8% from the December quarter. In the second quarter, Apple's iOS was up by 11%, indicating that Android is taking market share mainly from RIM, and still has to compete with heavy consumer demand for new competitor offerings.[138] Furthermore, analysts pointed to advantages that Android has as a multi-channel, multi-carrier OS, which allowed it to duplicate the quick success of Microsoft's Windows Mobile.In early October 2010, Google added 20 countries to its list of approved submitters. By mid-October, purchasing apps will be available in a total of 32 countries.[140] For a complete list of countries that are allowed to sell apps and those able to buy them see Android Market. As of December 2010 Google said over 300,000 Android phones were being activated daily, up from 100,000 per day in May 2010. In February 2011, during the 2011 Mobile World Congress, Eric Schmidt announced that Android has reached 350,000 activations per day.

Android breaks down the barriers to building new and innovative applications. For example, a developer can combine information from the web with data on an individual's mobile phone — such as the user's contacts, calendar, or geographic location — to provide a more relevant user experience. With Android, a developer can build an application that enables users to view the location of their friends and be alerted when they are in the vicinity giving them a chance to connect. Also Android provides access to a wide range of useful libraries and tools that can be used to build rich applications. For example, Android enables developers to obtain the location of the device, and allows devices to communicate with one another enabling rich peer-to-peer social applications. In addition, Android includes a full set of tools that have been built from the ground up alongside the platform providing developers with high productivity and deep insight into their applications.

Android includes a set of core libraries that provides most of the functionality available in the core libraries of the Java programming language. Every Android application runs in its own process, with its own instance of the Dalvik virtual machine. Dalvik has been written so that a device can run multiple VMs efficiently. The Dalvik VM executes files in the Dalvik Executable (.dex) format which is optimized for minimal memory footprint. The VM is register-based, and runs classes compiled by a Java language compiler that have been transformed into the .dex format by the included "dx" tool. The Dalvik Virtual Machine relies on the Linux kernel for underlying functionality such as threading and low-level memory management. Android relies on Linux version 2.6 for core system services such as security, memory management, process management, network stack, and driver model. The kernel also acts as an abstraction layer between the hardware and the rest of the software stack.



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