Recovery Plan for Three Orchid Species in South Australia and Victoria: Caladenia richardsiorum (Little Dip Spider-orchid) Caladenia calcicola (Limestone Spider-orchid) Pterostylis tenuissima




Yüklə 374.88 Kb.
səhifə5/6
tarix21.04.2016
ölçüsü374.88 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6

Part D: Objectives, Performance Criteria and Actions

6.1 Recovery Objectives and Performance Criteria


The primary objective of the recovery program is to maximise the chances of survival of all three species. This will be achieved through the process of recovery by ensuring that the most viable sub-populations across the range are self-sustaining.

Progress towards the primary objective is intended to be made over the life of this recovery plan through the achievement of the following objectives as demonstrated by the associated performance criteria (refer to Table 7).



  1. Acquire accurate information for conservation status assessments.

  2. Identify critical, common and potential habitat for the orchids and their pollinators.

  3. Conserve targeted sub-populations on private land.

  4. Manage threats to sub-populations.

  5. Determine growth rates and viability of sub-populations.

  6. Develop and undertake fine-scale site management practices.

  7. Establish/maintain sub-populations in cultivation.

  8. Establish new and re-stock sub-populations from cultivated plants or seed stock.

  9. Build a network of government and non-government organisations and individuals.

  10. Cooperate in bioregional policy implementation and manage recovery plan implementation.

6.2 Program Implementation and Evaluation


This recovery plan guides recovery actions for the three threatened orchid species and will be implemented and managed by the DEWNR and DSE supported by other agencies, educational institutions, regional natural resource management authorities and community groups as appropriate (Table 8). Technical, scientific, habitat management or education components of the recovery plan will be referred to specialist groups on research, in situ management, community education and cultivation as required.

Recovery actions are being achieved through the work of departmental staff and local individuals and groups involved in the management of sub-populations. For the life of this Plan, the overall direction for recovery of the species will be coordinated by DEWNR, DSE and representatives from community groups, as appropriate, through multi-species regional threatened species recovery teams. Where sub-populations occur on private property, landholders will be invited to become involved in the recovery process. Members of community groups and interested landholders may be trained in habitat management and monitoring of sub-populations in accordance with prescribed management actions.


6.3 Duration and Cost of Recovery Process


The recovery plan is intended to run for five years from the date of its adoption under the EPBC Act, and will be reviewed within five years by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) with support by other agencies as appropriate. However, the recovery of each of the species will be a long-term process to ensure that the most viable sub-populations across the range become self-sustaining.

The estimated cost for the five year life of this plan is in Table 9 and will be met through various direct and indirect funding activities undertaken by the DEWNR and DSE and supported by other agencies, educational institutions, regional natural resource management authorities and community groups.


6.4 Management Practices


Any management practices undertaken in, or directly adjacent to, essential or potential habitat of the nationally threatened plant species in this plan, that are likely to have a significant adverse impact, should be considered carefully. Any activities that may promote or contribute to the threats identified in this plan should be avoided where possible. Examples of such activities and potential management practices that may limit the success of threatened plant recovery are listed below but are not exclusive and should be treated as a guide.

  • Clearance of vegetation within or near essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Vehicle access through essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Grazing of livestock in essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Inadequate control of vertebrate pests in essential threatened species habitat.

  • Inadequate control of weed species in essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Inappropriate fire regimes.

  • Continued slashing or burning of essential or potential threatened species habitat during the growth period of the species.

  • Roadside vegetation maintenance in essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Construction or maintenance of management tracks or recreational trails through essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Construction of drains that impact on essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Activities that contribute to excessive foot traffic through essential or potential threatened species habitat.

  • Activity that promotes soil disturbance in or near areas of essential habitat susceptible to soil erosion.

  • Activity that reduces the size and increases the isolation of threatened plant sub-populations further.

  • Excessive collection of plant material from the wild including flowers, tubers and seeds.

Examples of activities that may either mitigate adverse impacts on, or indirectly benefit, the target species include:



    • Revegetation programs adjacent to threatened orchid sites, using indigenous species and designed to buffer and extend the area of suitable habitat.

    • Fencing of areas of native vegetation to exclude feral or domestic grazing animals.

    • Control of vertebrate pests such as goats and deer.

    • Prescribed burning programs conducted outside the growing season of the species.

6.5 Biodiversity Conservation Benefits


The implementation of this recovery plan will have broad biodiversity conservation benefits through the protection and management of habitats and increase community awareness and involvement. It is unlikely to have any negative impacts on any species or ecological communities.

The Coast Daisy-bush (Olearia axillaris) – Coast Beard-heath (Leucopogon parviflorus) shrubland in which Caladenia richardsiorum is found also provides habitat for a number of national and state listed species, some of which are Endangered. Nationally Endangered taxa include Sand Ixodia (Ixodia achillaeoides ssp. arenicola) and the Critically Endangered Orange-bellied Parrot (Neophema chrysogaster), which was flushed from near a sub-population of C. richardsiorum at Nora Creina (E. Lawson pers. comm. 2007). South Australian species listed as Vulnerable under the NPW Act are Dune Fanflower (Scaevola calendulacea) and Slender Speedwell (Veronica gracilis). The Rufous Bristlebird (Dasyornis broadbenti) is also found in this habitat and is listed as Vulnerable in South Australia.

Common Caladenia (C. vulgaris), listed as Rare in South Australia, has also been found growing in association with C. richardsiorum in Eucalyptus diversifolia ssp. diversifolia habitat. Many actions that improve the habitat for the target species at these sites may also advantage associated species such as C. vulgaris. Such outcomes are consistent with the priorities of the Biodiversity Plan for the South East of South Australia (Croft et al. 1999), as this habitat falls into the "priority coastal area" outlined in the plan.

Two of the vegetation communities in which C. calcicola occurs (Limestone Ridge Woodland and Limestone Woodland) are considered Rare in the West Victoria Region. A third community, Grassy Woodland/Hills Herb-rich Woodland/Damp Sands Herb-rich Woodland mosaic is Endangered within this region (CVRFASC 2000). Any actions that improve the habitat for C. calcicola will also benefit these communities.

Habitat protection and restoration work on Silky Tea-tree Scrub in which P. tenuissima occurs, will benefit this threatened ecological community. The habitat also supports sub-populations of many plant species of high conservation significance at the State and regional level (Croft & Carpenter 2000). Some benefits have already been made as a result of fieldwork associated with this project; for example new records have been made for three orchid taxa previously unrecorded in South Australia, namely P. lustra, Corybas sp. aff. diemenicus and Microtis sp. aff. rara. Any restoration of P. tenuissima habitat will benefit these significant species.

Orchids have the potential to act as ‘flagship species’ and be used to provide an important public education role for highlighting broader nature conservation and biodiversity issues such as land clearing, grazing, weed invasion and habitat degradation.


6.6 Affected Interests


Sub-populations for all three species occur on a variety of land tenure, including parks and reserves, unreserved public land (such as roadsides) and private land (refer to Table 3). A range of land managers are involved in managing these areas including DEWNR, DSE, Parks Victoria, Catchment Management Authorities, District Councils, Shires and private landholders.

Implementation of this recovery plan will require a co-ordinated approach involving partnership arrangements with the various affected and interested parties.


6.7 Role and Interests of Indigenous People


The role and interests of Indigenous communities in the region should be taken into consideration in the implementation of recovery actions. Consultation with the relevant South Australian Indigenous groups has been undertaken by DEWNR’s Aboriginal Partnerships Unit, who circulated a fact sheet summary of the plan to relevant Indigenous groups, and made follow-up contact to invite comment. No comments have been received from Indigenous groups to date. Victorian Indigenous communities involved in the region affected by this plan include the Gunditjmara. Implementation of recovery actions under this plan will include consideration of the role and interests of Indigenous communities in the region.

When implementing any recovery actions in this plan, the relevant provisions of the Native Title Act 1993 should be considered before undertaking any future acts that might affect Native Title. Nothing in the plan is intended to affect Native Title and the recovery plan will be adopted subject to any Native Title rights and interests that may continue in relation to the land.


6.8 Social and Economic Impacts


Sub-populations for all three species occur on a range of land tenures. Actions outlined in this plan are unlikely to significantly affect any party unfavourably, either socially or economically. Recovery actions outlined in this plan on public land will occur after negotiation with the relevant public land manager. It is not anticipated that any commercial or recreational activities will be adversely affected by implementing any recovery actions (e.g. loss of access, fencing or signage). Most sub-populations covered by this multi-species recovery plan occur on private land. Where applicable, voluntary agreements will be sought with private landholders to secure protection for sub-populations.

Table 7. Recovery objectives, actions and performance criteria. Management Priorities: 1 = high, 2 = moderate, 3 = low



Action

Description

Species Targeted

Performance Criteria

Priority

1: Acquire accurate information for conservation status assessments

1.1

Continue to acquire baseline data.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species


  • Updated records in departmental files and databases (Years 1-5)

  • Accurate information and maps of all sub-population locations (Partially achieved in writing Recovery Plan) (Year 1)

For C. richardsiorum & P. tenuissima

  • Updated regional IUCN and EPBC conservation status assessment (Years 1 & 2)

  • Development of Threatened Orchid relational database completed (Year 2)

For C. richardsiorum & C. calcicola

  • Identity of pollinator clarified and pollinator abundance confirmed (Years 1-3)

For C. richardsiorum

  • Taxonomic status of Meningie sub-population clarified (Year 2)

2

2: Identify critical, common and potential habitat for orchid and pollinator

2.1

Survey and assess known habitat in spring. Determine the presence of species for unconfirmed records.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species


  • Habitat critical to survival mapped and added to Threatened Orchid relational-database and disseminated to relevant land managers including councils (Years 1-3)

For C. richardsiorum

  • Recently recorded site near Meningie assessed (Year 1)

  • Anecdotal records validated / refuted (Years 1 & 2)

For P. tenuissima

  • Annual or biennial censuses of selected sub-populations completed (Years 1-5)

  • Soil testing undertaken at selected sub-populations to identify potential threat of salinity (Year 3)

  • Sub-populations located and mapped at Piccaninnie Ponds CP (Years 3 & 4)

1

2.2

Identify and survey potential habitat using geospatial habitat modelling.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species


  • Potential habitat identified and surveyed. For C. richardsiorum including targeted sites between Robe and Meningie; Southend and Port MacDonnell (Years 1-5)

For P. tenuissima at Piccaninnie Ponds CP

  • Potential habitat mapped and recorded as GIS layers and added to Threatened Orchid relational-database (Years 2 & 3)

2

3: Conserve targeted sub-populations on private land

3.1

Protect sub-populations on private land.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE, landholders

Caladenia richardsiorum

Pterostylis tenuissima

  • Protection negotiated with private land manager, and Heritage Agreement or Conservation Covenants initiated where possible (Years 1-4)

1

4: Manage threats to sub-populations

4.1

Control pest plants using site- and species-appropriate methods

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

  • Integrated weed management strategy developed for sites where weed invasion threatens sub-populations (Years 1-5)

  • A weed-free buffer established around priority sub-populations (Years 1-5)

For C. richardsiorum

  • Measurable decline (via mapping using GPS and GIS) in extent of Asparagus asparagoides, Polygala myrtifolia, Acacia longifolia subsp. sophorae and Vinca major at Heritage Agreement at Robe (Years 1-5)

  • Measurable decline (via mapping using GPS and GIS) in extent of Polygala myrtifolia, Freesia spp., Gazania linearis, Rhamnus alaternus, Leptospermum laevigatum, Billardiera heterophylla, Asparagus asparagoides and Vinca major in the council reserve at Beachport (Years 1-5)

1

4.2

Investigate and control grazing impacts.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

For C. richardsiorum

  • Grazing impacts investigated/quantified at 4 sites (Years 1-3)

  • Negotiations undertaken regarding a change in grazing regimes at Nora Creina private land site if appropriate (Year 2)

  • Rabbit control strategies developed and implemented where appropriate (Years 2-5)

  • Impacts of exotic terrestrial snails investigated and controlled if necessary (Years 2-5)

For C. calcicola

  • Individual target plants caged to protect from grazing (Year 1)

For P. tenuissima

  • Measurable seedling recruitment in affected private land sub-populations (Years 3-5)

1

4.3

Control site disturbance.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

For C. richardsiorum

  • Protective barriers constructed at Little Dip Conservation Park, council owned roadside at Robe and other sites if required (Years 1-3)

  • Signage erected to ensure visitors keep to the walking tracks (Year 1)

For C. calcicola

  • Fences maintained at all sites (Years 1-5)

For P. tenuissima

  • Continued liaison undertaken with land managers at West Dairy Range, Blackfellows Cave and Curdies River (Years 1-5)

  • Measurable reduction in damage to plants in affected sub-populations (Years 3-5)

1

4.4

Investigate and implement appropriate fire regimes.

Responsibility: DSE

Caladenia calcicola

  • Burn plan developed and implemented at Lower Glenelg National Park site, Nelson and Wildlife Reserve, Portland (Years 4-5)

2

5: Determine the growth rates and viability of sub-populations

5.1

Measure population trends and responses to recovery actions.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

  • Demographic information collected, including recruitment and mortality, timing of life history stages and morphological data (Years 1-5)

  • Population Viability Analysis completed for selected sub-populations (Year 5)

2

5.2

Collate, analyse and report on census data and compare with management histories.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE, Recovery Team

All 3 species

  • Threatened Orchid relational-database maintained using updated census records (Years 1-5)

  • Management assessed and prescriptions revised if necessary (Year 5)

3

6: Develop and undertake fine-scale site management practices

6.1

Manage microhabitat for seedling recruitment at all sub-populations.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

  • Measurable increase in recruitment at target sub-populations in 5 years (Year 5)

  • No decline in recruitment at remaining sub-populations in 5 years (Year 5)

For C. calcicola and P. tenuissima

  • Mycorrhizal fungi mapped at selected sites when seed available (Years 1-5)

3

6.2

Hand-pollinate to boost recruitment, collect seed and test viability

Responsibility: DEWNR (SE Region and Seed Conservation Centre (SCC)), Wimmera Catchment Management Authority Germplasm Research Centre (WCMAGRC), DSE & RBG

All 3 species

  • Hand pollination protocol developed and selected individuals hand pollinated in selected sub-populations (Years 1-5)

  • Seed collected from selected sub-populations and tested. Seed held in storage (Years 1-5)

  • Seed viability analysis undertaken (Years 1-5)

1

6.3

Enhance pollinator habitat.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

Caladenia richardsiorum

Caladenia calcicola

  • Site rehabilitation works undertaken if necessary, and subject to native vegetation clearance approval, to support pollinator sub-populations at selected sites if necessary (Year 4-5)

2

7: Establish/maintain sub-populations in cultivation

7.1

Establish cultivated plants ex situ to safeguard from the unforeseen destruction of the wild population.

Responsibility: DEWNR (SE Region and SCC), WCMAGRC, DSE & RBG

Caladenia richardsiorum

Pterostylis tenuissima

  • Representative 40 mature individuals of each species in cultivation (Years 4-5)

3

7.2

Maintain cultivated plants ex situ to safeguard from the unforeseen destruction of the wild population.

Responsibility: SCC, WCMAGRC and RBG

Caladenia calcicola

  • At least 50 mature plants maintained in cultivation at a number of locations (Years 4-5)

1

7.3

Establish a threatened orchid seed and fungi bank and determine seed viability.

Responsibility: SCC & WCMAGRC

Caladenia richardsiorum

Pterostylis tenuissima

  • Collars collected from selected sub-populations and fungi isolated (Year 1)

  • Seed from selected sub-populations in long term storage in 5 years (Years 1-5)

1

7.4

Maintain the established threatened orchid seed and fungi bank and determine seed viability.

Responsibility: DSE and RBG

Caladenia calcicola

  • Isolated fungi maintained in storage (Years 1-2)

  • Seed from selected sub-populations in long-term storage in 5 years (Years 1-5)

3

7.5

Establish and maintain a database of threatened plants in cultivation.

Responsibility: DEWNR & WCMAGRC

Caladenia richardsiorum

Pterostylis tenuissima

  • Seed bank database established within five years (Years 1-5)

2

7.6

Maintain a seed and fungi bank database.

Responsibility: DSE and RBG


Caladenia calcicola

  • Relevant details entered in seed and fungi bank database and maintained (Years 1-5)

3

8: Establish new and restock sub-populations from cultivated plants or seed stock

8.1

Restock selected sub-populations using plants cultivated ex-situ

Responsibility: DEWNR & WCMAGRC

Caladenia richardsiorum

Pterostylis tenuissima

  • Long-term survival of, and recruitment from, plants used for restocking at selected sites (Years 3-5)

  • For P. tenuissima, re-stocking undertaken at Piccaninnie Ponds CP (Years 3-5)

3

8.2

Investigate the historic site at Mt Burr SA for a potential reintroduction.

Responsibility: DEWNR

Caladenia calcicola

  • Consultation undertaken with Forestry SA (Year 1)

  • Preparation of a site reintroduction plan if FSA consultation positive (Years 2 & 3)

  • Successful pollinator baiting trials (Year 2)

3

8.3

Prepare site, subject to native vegetation clearance approval if needed, and maintain to achieve maximum survival of plants and/or germination of seed

Responsibility: DEWNR and DSE

Caladenia calcicola

  • Techniques implemented as described in the site reintroduction plan in action 8.2. at Mt Burr and within Wildlife Reserve (Portland) to successfully reintroduce mature individuals (Years 3-4)

3

8.4

Reintroduce and monitor plants at Wildlife Reserve (Portland) and Mt Burr Range sites.

Responsibility: DEWNR & DSE

Caladenia calcicola

  • Measurable sub-population increase at Wildlife Reserve (Portland) and Mt Burr Range sites (Years 4-5)

3

9: Build a network of government and non-government organisations and individuals

9.1

Undertake community extension by encouraging individuals to report sightings of C. richardsiorum to regional DEWNR personnel, as well as promoting threatened flora conservation and organising searches if required.

Responsibility: DEWNR

Caladenia richardsiorum

  • Community members have been encouraged to report sightings of C. richardsiorum or, in the case of NOSSA have actively searched for C. richardsiorum if deemed necessary (Years 1-5)

3

9.2

Continue to liaise with industry and government stakeholders to ensure the protection of Caladenia calcicola.

Responsibility: DSE

Caladenia calcicola

  • Information provided to relevant private and public management bodies as well as State and Australian Governments (Years 1-5)

3

9.3

Encourage and support research by Higher Education Institutions and other research partners.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE & Research partner(s)


All 3 species

  • Collaborative research partnerships formed and funding applications prepared (Years 1-3)

3

10: Cooperate in bioregional policy implementation and manage recovery plan implementation

10.1

Facilitate the Regional Recovery Teams for these species and other regional threatened flora.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

  • For C. richardsiorum & C. calcicola, one Threatened Orchid Recovery Team meeting held annually (Years 1-5)

  • For P. tenuissima, two Regional Recovery Team meetings held annually (Years 1-5)

  • Annual work plans prepared (Years 1-5)

1

10.2

Coordinate recovery and exchange knowledge with government agencies.

Responsibility: DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

  • Regular communication with State, interstate and Australian Government agencies maintained to advance management and implement legislation and policies (Years 1-5)

3


Table 8: List of national, state and regional stakeholders.

National Stakeholders

Australian National Herbarium

Australian Native Orchid Society

Australian Network for Plant Conservation

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (Australian Government)

General Public

State Stakeholders

Conservation Council of South Australia

Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (SA Government) *

Department of Sustainability and Environment (Victorian Government) *

Flinders University

ForestrySA (South Australian Government)

General public

Native Orchid Society of South Australia

Natural History Society of South Australia

Parks Victoria *

Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne

SA Country Fire Service

South Australian Seed Conservation Centre, Botanic Gardens of Adelaide, DEWNR (SA Government)



State Herbarium of South Australia

University of Adelaide

University of South Australia

Regional Stakeholders

Beachport District Development Corporation *

Coorong District Council

Corangamite Shire Council *

Friends of Canunda and Beachport Conservation Parks*

Friends of Little Dip and Butchers Gap Conservation Parks *

Friends of Mount Gambier Area Parks*

General Public

Grant District Council

Kingston District Council

Limestone Coast and Coorong Coastal Management Group

Moyle Shire Council *

Private Landholders *

Robe District Council *

South East Natural Resource Management Board

Southern Ocean Coastcare

Wattle Range District Council *

* Group directly owns and/or manages land supporting sub-populations and habitat of one of the orchid species

Table 9. Estimated costs of implementing the recovery actions. Management Priorities: 1 = high, 2 = moderate, 3 = low

Action

Description

Priority

Responsibility

Species

Cost estimate ($)

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Total

1: Acquire accurate information for conservation status assessments

1.1

Acquire baseline population data

3

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

4 500

5 500

2 000

1 000

1 000

14 000

2: Identify critical, common and potential habitat for orchid and pollinator

2.1

Survey and assess known habitat

1

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

4 500

3 500

4 500

2 000

1 000

15 500

2.2

Identify and survey potential habitat

2

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

2 500

5 000

5 000

2 500

2 500

17 500

3: Conserve targeted sub-populations on private land

3.1

Protect sub-populations on private land

1

DEWNR, DSE, landholders

C. richardsiorum

P. tenuissima



3 000

6 000

1 000

1 000

0

11 000

4: Manage threats to sub-populations

4.1

Control pest plants

1

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

12 000

11 500

10 500

10 500

10 500

55 000

4.2

Investigate and control grazing impacts

1

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

1 500

3 000

3 500

2 500

2 500

13 000

4.3

Control site disturbance

1

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

2 000

1 500

2 000

1 500

1 500

8 500

4.4

Investigate and implement appropriate fire regimes

2

DSE

C. calcicola

1 000

1 000

1 000

3 000

3 000

9 000

5: Determine the growth rates and viability of sub-populations

5.1

Measure population trends

2

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

2 500

2 500

2 500

2 500

5 000

15 000

5.2

Collate, analyse and report on census data

3

DEWNR, DSE, Recovery Team

All 3 species

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

7 500

6: Develop and undertake fine-scale site management practices

6.1

Manage microhabitat

3

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

6 000

6 000

3 000

3 000

3 000

21 000

6.2

Hand-pollinate to boost recruitment, collect seed and test viability

1

DEWNR, WCMAGRC, DSE & RBG

All 3 species

1 500

1 500

3 000

4 000

4 500

14 500

6.3

Enhance pollinator habitat

2

DEWNR, DSE

C. richardsiorum

C. calcicola

1 000

1 000

1 000

5 000

6 000

14 000

7: Establish/maintain sub-populations in cultivation

7.1

Establish cultivated plants ex situ

3

DEWNR, WCMAGRC, DSE & RBG

C. richardsiorum

P. tenuissima

4 000

4 000

5 000

5 000

5 000

23 000

7.2

Maintain cultivated plants ex situ

1

SCC, WCMAGRC, RBG

C. calcicola

2 000

2 000

2 000

2 000

2 000

10 000

7.3

Establish a threatened orchid seed and fungi bank

1

SCC, WCMAGRC

C. richardsiorum

P. tenuissima

6 000

4 000

2 000

2 000

2 000

16 000

7.4

Maintain the established threatened orchid seed and fungi bank

3

DSE, RBG

C. calcicola

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

5 000

7.5

Maintain a database of threatened plants in cultivation

2

DEWNR, WCMAGRC

C. richardsiorum

P. tenuissima

1 500

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

5 500

7.6

Maintain a seed and fungi bank database

3

DSE, RBG

C. calcicola

500

500

500

500

500

2 500

8: Establish new and restock sub-populations from cultivated plants or seed stock

8.1

Restock selected sub-populations using plants cultivated ex-situ

3

DEWNR, WCMAGRC

C. richardsiorum

P. tenuissima

1 000

1 500

2 000

1 500

1 500

7 500

8.2

Investigate the historic site

3

DEWNR

C. calcicola

500

1 500

500

0

0

2 500

8.3

Prepare site

3

DEWNR, DSE

C. calcicola

0

0

2 000

1 000

0

3 000

8.4

Reintroduce and monitor plants

3

DEWNR, DSE

C. calcicola

0

0

0

3 000

2 000

5 000

9: Build a network of government and non-government organisations and individuals

9.1

Undertake community extension

3

DEWNR

C. richardsiorum

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

5 000

9.2

Continue to liaise with stakeholders

3

DSE

C. calcicola

500

500

500

500

500

2 500

9.3

Encourage and support research

3

DEWNR, DSE & Research partners

All 3 species

1 000

2 000

2 500

1 000

1 000

7 500

10: Cooperate in bioregional policy implementation and manage recovery plan implementation

10.1

Facilitate Regional Recovery Team

1

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

7 500

10.2

Coordinate recovery and exchange knowledge

3

DEWNR, DSE

All 3 species

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

7 500

Total













65 500

71 500

63 500

62 500

62 500

325 500
1   2   3   4   5   6


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azrefs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə