Record of views formed in response to inquiries




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Record of views formed in response to inquiries


updated March 2015
The following table provides a record of views formed and actions taken in relation to Standard 1.5.1 – Novel Foods of the Code. The table lists foods and food ingredients with views as to their status as non-traditional/novel foods. Prior to March 2008, these views were reached by the now superseded Novel Food Reference Group (NFRG) either alone or in consultation with Senior Food Officers of the Australian, State, Territory and New Zealand Governments, as well as the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (black text in the table below). Since March 2008, the views recorded are the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Novel Foods (ANCF) (blue text in the table below). Although the FSANZ NFRG no longer exists, the views formed by this group still represent a considered judgement of the product on the basis of information provided by inquirers as well as some independent research by FSANZ.
Other foods and food ingredients not included in the table have been considered in response to inquiries. However, views in relation to these items have not yet been formed, pending receipt of further information requested from the inquirer.
Enforcement of the Code is the responsibility of the Australian state and territory governments and the New Zealand Government. Accordingly, the interpretation and application of Standard 1.5.1, including decisions about the novelty of a food or food ingredient, is ultimately the responsibility of those jurisdictions.

Important Notice

The composition, form and manner in which a product is presented, as well as the information available in relation to a product, may vary and this may affect the status of the product under Standard 1.5.1. Therefore, the information in the table should only be treated as a general guide, and you should not expect that a view reached about a food or food ingredient listed in the table will always apply in relation to apparently similar products. The views indicated may be subject to review and amendment.


Enquirers are encouraged to seek independent legal or professional advice in relation to queries.

Record of views formed by the FSANZ Novel Foods Reference Group or the Advisory Committee on Novel Foods


(Entries included since the last update are highlighted in yellow, black text designates views of the superseded NFRG, blue text designates views of the ACNF)


Food or food ingredient

Outcome View

Justification/Comment

Acacia rigidula

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

No tradition of use as food in Australia and New Zealand. Potential for adverse effects if consumed. Safety not established.

Ackee fruit (Blighia sapida) – sourced from Jamaica

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Significant safety concerns if consumed unripe or improperly prepared.

Acerola (Malpighia glabra L) – frozen fruit pulp

History of safe consumption in other countries. No safety concerns identified.

African mango seed – aqueous extract (Irvingia gabonensis)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. Tradition of use of the seed in western Africa when dried. However, no tradition of use when prepared as an aqueous extract. Purported weight loss effects of the aqueous extract require additional assessment before it can be sold as a food in Australia and New Zealand.

Agaricus blazei murill mushroom

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Insufficient knowledge in community to enable safe use.

Agave nectar (from Agave tequilana azul)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

History of use as a sweet nectar in Mexico. No safety concerns identified.

Akudjera (Bush Tomato) (Solanum centrale)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use as a food in Australia and New Zealand.

Algalin flour (from Chlorella protothecoides strain S106)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use of Chlorella species as a food in Australia and New Zealand.

Aloe vera (juice and juice concentrate)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Small established market for beverages in Australia and New Zealand.

Alpha Lipoic acid (also known as thiotic acid)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Safety not established for proposed pattern and level of use.

Amaranth seed (Amaranthus sp)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified.

Amomum tsaoko (seed)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

View is based on use as a spice. No safety concerns identified based on this use.

Anise myrtle (Anetholea anisata)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use as a food in Australia and New Zealand.

Aphanizomenon flos aquae

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Safety concerns due to the potential presence of cyanobacterial toxins such as microcytin and nodularin.

Apple polyphenol extract

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified based on specifications provided.

Apple polyphenol extract (Evesse EPCTM - derived from EvesseTM apples)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

No tradition of use of this extract as a food ingredient in Australia and New Zealand. Safety not established for proposed pattern and level of use and composition of extract requires additional assessment before it can be sold as a food in Australia and New Zealand.

Note: This view differs from a previous apple polyphenol product (see above entry). The extract that is subject to this view is highly refined and contains levels of specific polyphenols that, coupled with the intended levels of use, is likely to result in greater dietary exposure than would occur from consumption of apples and other foods that may contain these polyphenols.



Arachidonic acid (ARA) sourced from Fungus Mortierella alpina

  • Traditional food for infants

  • Not novel food

Traditional food for infants with no safety concerns identified based on this use.

Argan oil (derived from the fruit kernels of Argania spinosa)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

History of safe use in other countries. Chemical composition consistent with other vegetable based edible oils.

Asafoetida (Ferala assafoetida)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use as a spice in Australia and New Zealand.

Astragalus membranaceous

(powdered root added to powdered chocolate beverage at 0.25% w/w)



  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified at proposed level of use.

Bacillus coagulans (probiotic bacteria)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional in Australia and New Zealand, although some evidence of use in natto (Japanese fermented soybean product). No safety concerns identified.

BARLEYmax TM - barley bred using traditional breeding techniques

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified.

Bentonite clay

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified at proposed levels of use.

Berries from palm fruit Acai (Euterpe oleracea) sourced from Brazil

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

History of use in South America. No safety concerns identified.

Beta palmitin vegetable oil

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Use in infant formula products in overseas markets with no safety concerns identified based on this use. No concerns regarding composition.

Betaine (extracted from sugar beet)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Non-traditional in context of being extracted and added to food in Australia and New Zealand. Safety not established in this context.

Bifidobacterium lactis (probiotic bacteria)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Long history of use in yogurt and fermented milk products.

Birds’ nests (as produced by swiftlets in south-east Asia from saliva)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

History of safe use in Asian countries. No adverse health effects observed. No harmful substances identified. Relevant quarantine requirements exist.

Blackberry leaves and roots (Rubus fruticosis)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. Safety not established.

Boab fruit (otherwise known as boab nuts, from the Boab tree, Adansonia)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Limited history of safe use in indigenous communities. No safety concerns identified. No concerns regarding composition.

Borojoa Patinoi (dried fruit pulp powder)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. Consumption is associated with various purported physiological effects and the composition of the product is not adequately characterised.

Caja (Spondias mombin) – frozen puree.

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food. History of use in South America. No safety concerns identified.

Calamondin or calamansi fruit and fruit juice (X Citrofortunella microcarpa)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Derived from a cross between citrus and cumquat. Appears to be available interchangeably with cumquats.

Calcium fructoborate

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Non-traditional when added to foods. Safety concerns based on potential for increased intake of boron.

Calcium sucrose phosphate

(intended use at up to 2% of carbohydrate content of a range of foods)



  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified at intended levels of use.

Camelina oil (Camelina sativa)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. No safety concerns identified, noting that erucic acid content of edible oils is subject to a maximum level of 20,000mg/kg in Standard 1.4.1 – Contaminants and Natural Toxicants - of the Code.

Camelina spice (Camelina sativa)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. No safety concerns identified.

This view is for Camelina spice only, where the seed of Camelina sativa has been roasted and ground into powder for use as a spice.



Camu camu fruit (Myrciaria dubia)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified. No concerns regarding composition.

Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L) – frozen fruit pulp

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

History of use in South America. No safety concerns identified. No concerns regarding composition.

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Traditional food, however knowledge about appropriate preparation required to ensure safe consumption. Requirement for preparation instructions in Standard 1.2.6 – Directions for Use and Storage.

Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No safety concerns identified.

Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. No safety concerns identified.

Chlorella sorokiniana

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use of Chlorella species as a food in Australia and New Zealand. Chlorella sorokiniana is now classified as a separate Chlorella species, after previously being included within the classification of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

Citrin (5-hydroxycitric acid)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Safety concerns based on potential for adverse effects in humans.

Cocoa fruit (Theobroma ncar) – frozen puree

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand. History of use as a food in South America. No indications of safety concerns.

Cocona fruit (Solanum sessiliflorum, also known as Solanum topiro)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

No concerns identified regarding composition or safety

Coffee berry (whole fruit of Coffea arabica)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Use of whole fruit of coffee plant is not traditional in Australia and New Zealand (although use of the seed, or coffee bean, is traditional). History of use in Africa and Middle East. Safety not established.

Colostrum (bovine, pre-milk produced by the cow’s mammary glands in the first 72 hours after birth of the calf)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in the population in Australia and New Zealand. No safety concerns identified.

(This view has been amended to correct the previous reference to bovine colostrum being a traditional food for infants. The ACNF considered that bovine colostrum is not a traditional food for infants).



Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Safety concerns based on structure and proposed pattern and level of use. Two Applications received by FSANZ in 2008 (A1005 and A1012)


Cordyceps sinensis

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

No tradition of use of Cordyceps sinensis as a food in Australia and New Zealand. Safety is not established as a food – potential for pharmacological effects based on its use as a traditional medicine. In addition, potential adverse effects have been reported in scientific literature.

Corn fibre (referred to as corn Ztrim)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Corn fibre (insoluble dietary fibre) in powdered form is prepared from dry milled corn bran.

Cornus mas

(Cornelian cherry)



  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Limited evidence of use as a food in Australia and New Zealand. However, there is a history of safe use as a food in other countries. No identified safety concerns based on the composition of the fruit.

Note. This view relates only to the edible portion of the fruit of Cornus mas.



Cornus officinalis

(Japanese Cornelian cherry)



  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Limited evidence of use as a food in Australia and New Zealand. However, there is a history of safe use as a food in other countries. No identified safety concerns based on the composition of the fruit.

Note. This view relates only to the edible portion of the fruit of Cornus officinalis.



Cranberry extract powder

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Cranberry extract powder produced from cranberry juice concentrate. Sugars and organic solids are removed, while phenolic compounds are retained in the extract. Intended use of the extract in beverage products as a source of phenolic compounds. Components of cranberry extract powder have a history of consumption from cranberry juice products.

This view only applies to cranberry extract powder added to beverages at a level that ensures the concentration of phenolic compounds in the final product is not greater than the concentration of these compounds in cranberry juice products.



α-Cyclodextrin

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food




Safety not established for proposed pattern and level of use Application to FSANZ (A494). Permission in Standard 1.5.1.

γ-Cyclodextrin

  • Non-traditional food

  • Novel food

Safety not established for proposed pattern and level of use. Application to FSANZ (A438). Permission in Standard 1.5.1.

Dairy mineral concentration (Lactosalt Optitaste)

  • Non-traditional food

  • Not novel food

Non-traditional food in Australia and New Zealand in context presented. Isolation and concentration of milk minerals and subsequent addition to other foods is not consistent with the history of consumption of dairy products. No safety concerns identified.

Damiana (Turnera diffusa or Turnera aphrodisiaca, same species) – non-culinary herb

  • Non-traditional food.

  • Not novel food when used in beverages at less than 100 mg/100 ml

No safety concerns identified at low levels of use. No application required when in beverages at less than 100 mg/100 ml.

Davidson Plum (Davidsonia pruriens, Davidsonia, jerseyana, Davidsonia johnsonii)

  • Traditional food

  • Not novel food

Tradition of use as a food, mainly in Australia.
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