Project Identification Form (pif) Project Type: Full-sized Project Type of Trust Fund: gef trust fund




Yüklə 218.53 Kb.
səhifə1/3
tarix21.04.2016
ölçüsü218.53 Kb.
  1   2   3

Project Identification Form (PIF)

Project Type: Full-sized Project

Type of Trust Fund: GEF Trust fund



PART I: Project Information

Project Title:

Sustainable forest management to secure multiple benefits in Pakistan's high conservation value forests

Country(ies):

Pakistan

GEF Project ID:

5660

GEF Agency(ies):

UNDP

GEF Agency Project ID:

4674

Other Executing Partner(s):

Ministry of Climate Change

Provincial and territorial Forest Departments



Submission Date:

Resubmitted:



18 Dec 2013

16 January 2014



GEF Focal Area (s):

Multi-Focal Areas

Project Duration (Months)

60

Name of parent program (if applicable):

  • For SFM/REDD+ 

  • For SGP 

n/a

Agency Fee ($):

792,110


  1. Indicative Focal AREA STRATEGY Framework:

    Focal Area Objectives

    Trust Fund

    Indicative

    Grant Amount

    ($)

    Indicative Co-financing

    ($)

    SFM/REDD-1: Reduce pressures on forest resources and generate sustainable flows of forest ecosystem services

    GEFTF

    2,070,000

    7,680,000

    BD-2: Mainstream biodiversity conservation and sustainable use into production landscapes, seascapes and sectors

    GEFTF

    3,494,000

    7,670,000

    CCM-5: Promote conservation and enhancement of carbon stocks through sustainable management of land use, land use change and forestry

    GEFTF

    2,774,000

    11,150,000

    Total Project Cost




    8,338,000

    26,500,000

  2. Indicative Project Framework

    Project Objective: To promote sustainable forest management in Pakistan's West Himalayan Coniferous, Scrub and Riverine forests for biodiversity conservation, mitigation of climate change and securing of forest ecosystem services

    Project Component

    Grant Type1


    Expected Outcomes


    Expected Outputs

    Trust Fund

    Indicative

    Grant Amount ($)

    Indicative Cofinancing

    ($)

    1. Embedding SFM into landscape-scale spatial planning

    TA


    Multiple ecological values and reduced deforestation and degradation secured, land use conflict and illegal activities reduced2 and sustainable economic use enabled in 26,000 ha of important West Himalayan Coniferous forests, 3,400 ha of Scrub forests, and 26,200 ha of Riverine forests.

    1.1 Forest ecosystem services in target areas mapped and evaluated; valuation methodology embedded in forestry planning process for further replication.
    1.2 Spatial plans in target areas revised to integrate outcomes of ecosystem services valuation; to delineate High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF) and multiple-use forestry zones that are identified as high carbon forests; regimes of protection and/or economic use defined and piloted; business plans revised/designed for selected forest zones.
    1.3 Detailed analysis of direct benefits to stakeholders completed that will include comparisons between (i) currently ongoing or potential unsustainable practices, and (ii) project proposed sustainable practices. This comparative analysis will help demonstrate that the latter can be sustained beyond project completion.

    1.4 For multiple-use zones with existing or potential stakeholder conflicts within target areas: land tenure issues resolved through transparent participatory step-by-step resolution mechanisms and appropriate co-management and governance models; enforcement mechanisms put in place to control illegal activities.


    1.5 Training modules designed and delivered to provincial and local governments and community leaders for the target areas, and inserted into the curriculum of the Pakistan Forest Institute on: (i) ecosystem valuation; (ii) HCVF, multiple use and spatial planning, (iii) management and business planning, (iv) participatory approaches in management and governance for conflict resolution
    1.6 Development and implementation of a sustainable exit plan for the project

    GEFTF

    1,937,650

    7,259,365

    2. Biodiversity conservation strengthened in and around High Conservation Value Forests
    (baseline and target to be confirmed during PPG)

    TA

    Reduced anthropogenic pressure on 16,000 ha High Conservation Value Forests leading to stability or improved status of rare and threatened indicator species including Tragopan melanocephalus, Ovis vignei punjabensis and Panthera pardus
    Management effectiveness of protected areas within HCVFs increased
    Model set for a Community Managed Conservation Areas in High Value Coniferous Forests with high potential for replication

    2.1 Avoided conversion of at least 16,000 ha3 of High Value Coniferous Forests identified in Output 1.2: forest use regime changed from commercial logging / firewood collection to biodiversity conservation (PAs) and non-exhaustive community forest management for tourism and NTFPs.
    2.1a For PAs within the 16,000 ha HCVFs: boundaries of new / existing protected areas, buffer zones and biodiversity corridors delineated based on detailed biodiversity assessments and management regimes designed and tested;
    2.1b For Community-Managed Conservation Area: At least 4,000ha under model community governance and management. Operated as carbon PES based on REDD+ approach: Trilateral compact between Government, communities and private sector; carbon benefits documented in line with the REDD+ MRV [developed in parallel by UN-REDD]4
    2.2 Biodiversity conservation and capacities in and around high conservation value forests reinforced through training, enhanced enforcement, guidelines and co-management; training modules integrated into Pakistan Forest Institute curriculum.

    GEFTF

    3,361,651

    7,249,365

    3. Enhanced carbon sequestration in and around HCVF in target forested landscapes

    TA


    Practical best practice approaches to forest restoration implemented around HCVFs delivering CC benefits of annually sequestering 276.4 kton CO2-eq of carbon with additional biodiversity co-benefits

    3.1 Restoration of 10,000 ha of Coniferous forest and 3,400ha of Scrub forest through assisted natural regeneration; reforestation of 26,200 ha of Riverine forests with indigenous species, realizing carbon benefits as indicated;
    3.2 Best practice silvicultural approaches to forest restoration and reforestation documented; capacities enhanced with training and local language guidelines.
    3.3 Nationally-tailored methodology for measuring carbon stocks and fluxes (developed under a parallel UN-REDD Readiness Programme) applied, demonstrated and validated for the target areas.

    GEFTF

    2,641,651

    10,729,365

    Subtotal







    7,940,952

    25,238,095

    Project Management Cost (PMC)

    (drawing 5% from each focal area)

    GEFTF

    397,048

    1,261,905

    Total Project Cost







    8,338,000

    26,500,000

  3. Indicative Co-financing for the project by source and by name if available, ($)

    Sources of Cofinancing

    Name of Cofinancier

    Type of Cofinancing

    Amount ($)

    National Government

    Min. Climate Change

    Grant

    10,000,000

    National Government

    Min. Climate Change and

    Provincial Forest Departments



    In-kind

    7,500,000

    GEF Agency

    UNDP

    Grant

    1,000,000

    Bilateral Aid Agencies

    To be financed in accordance with the Cancun Agreement on Long-term Cooperative Action

    Grant

    6,000,000

    Private Sector

    Unknown at this stage

    Unknown at this stage

    2,000,000

    Total Cofinancing







    26,500,000

  4. indicative trust fund Resources ($) Requested by Agency, Focal Area and Country

GEF Agency

Type of Trust Fund

Focal Area

Country Name/Global

Grant Amount ($) (a)

Agency Fee ($) (b)

Total ($) c=a+b

UNDP

GEFTF

MFA - SFM/REDD-1

Pakistan

2,070,000

196,650

2,266,650

UNDP

GEFTF

BD-2

Pakistan

3,494,000

331,930

3,825,930

UNDP

GEFTF

CCM-5

Pakistan

2,774,000

263,530

3,037,530

Total Grant Resources

8,338,000

792,110

9,130,110




  1. Project preparation grant (ppg)

Please check on the appropriate box for PPG as needed for the project according to the GEF Project Grant:

Amount Agency Fee

Requested ($) for PPG ($)

  • (up to) $200k for projects up to & including $10 million ___200,000________ _19,000_____


PPG Amount requested by agency(ies), focal area(s) and country(ies) for MFA and/or MTF Project only


Trust Fund

GEF Agency

Focal Area

Country Name/

Global

(in $)


PPG (a)

Agency

Fee (b)

Total

c = a + b



GEFTF

UNDP

SFM/REDD-1

Pakistan

50,000

4750

54,750

GEFTF

UNDP

BD-2

Pakistan

84,000

7980

91,980

GEFTF

UNDP

CCM-5

Pakistan

66,000

6270

72,270

Total PPG Amount

200,000

19,000

219,000


part ii: project JustiFication

Project Overview



A.1. Project Description
Summary

Pakistan is a low forest cover country, with only 5% of the land area remaining under forest cover (0.03 ha/capita)5. However, it harbours a great variety of forest types reflecting the country's physiographic and climatic contrasts: these include temperate and subtropical coniferous forests, scrub forests, riverine forests and mangroves. These forests (particularly those in the north) deliver crucial ecosystem services to the country in the form of natural resources critical for livelihoods (timber and non-timber forest products), water provisioning, disaster prevention, climate regulation, carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation. Demand for timber and fuel wood have been the main economic drivers underpinning forest degradation. These, together with severe overgrazing in many areas have led to significant loss and degradation of the forest resource. The forest estate (which includes State-owned, communal or privately owned land) has already suffered extensive de-forestation and remains under severe threat of further deforestation (in the order of 27,000 ha/yr). According to the Forest Resource Assessment 2010 (FAO), deforestation and forest degradation have caused a reduction of carbon stock in above- and under-ground biomass from 330 to 213 million tons from 1990 to 2010, constituting an annual decrease of 2.2%. Land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) is calculated to contribute 9.7% overall to Pakistan's carbon emissions. The provincial and territorial Forest Departments, who are responsible for forest management, do not have adequate capacity to address deforestation and forest degradation. The importance of forests in terms of the provision and regulation of ecosystem services is recognised by the Government, which set a national MDG target of increasing forest cover up to 6% by 2015; this has triggered new and additional budgetary appropriations for central government-funded forestry programmes. However, provincial funding for forest management is limited due to competing demands from social and economic sectors. Pakistan is a UN-REDD Partner country, and recently a REDD+ Preparedness Phase Project (R-PP) for Pakistan has been initiated by the Ministry of Climate Change.


The project will promote an integrated approach at landscape level for the management of high conservation value forests that will deliver global biodiversity, carbon benefits and ecosystem services to local communities and enhance resilience across 3 target landscapes totalling 55,600ha. The GEF resources will create a model for sustainable forest management that can be up-scaled across other forest landscapes. The project has been designed to fit seamlessly with the REDD+ readiness initiative. Whilst the R-PP will support preparation of the federal and provincial level strategic and policy framework and national level methodologies and capacities for REDD implementation, this project will operationalize sustainable forest management at landscape scale. Such practical demonstration is a necessary requirement, which will not be delivered by, but which will complement the current R-PP. This will be the first time that such an approach has been undertaken at such a scale, and will provide a vital base for capacity building and up-scaling. Without the project, successful demonstration of this landscape-scale approach to sustainable forest management would not take place for many years. As a result critical forest landscapes of high biodiversity and carbon significance will continue to face the threat of degradation and loss and a suite of barriers - described below - will impede the advancement of sustainable forest management.
Context and Global Significance:

Due to high variations in rainfall and geomorphology, Pakistan has a remarkable diversity of forest and other ecosystems, resulting in high species diversity and high endemism (about 7% of species), particularly in the forested mountainous regions. Pakistan harbours 174 mammal species (3 endemic), 668 bird species (10 endemic), 177 reptile species (13 endemic), 22 amphibian species (9 endemic) and 198 fresh water species (29 endemic). Pakistan’s forests provide important wildlife habitat but deforestation, degradation and fragmentation have resulted in great loss of biodiversity. In total 53 vertebrate species are threatened. Pakistan’s forests provide an important habitat for over 300 migratory bird species using the Central Asian flyway; 55 Important Bird Areas have been identified. Coniferous forests harbour one critically endangered bird species, one endangered bird, 4 critically endangered mammals (e.g. snow leopard (Uncia uncial) and brown bear (Ursus arctos isanellinus)) and 6 endangered mammals, as well as one endemic mammal (Eupetaurus cinereus). Scrub forest harbours 5 critically endangered bird species, 5 endangered bird species, nine critically endangered mammals, and 7 endangered mammals as well as 2 endemic mammals (Baluchistan black bear (Ursus thibetanus gedrosianus), and Punjab urial (Ovis vignei punjabensis). The Indus basin harbours several endangered aquatic bird species and riverine forests are a critically important habitat for migratory birds and for nesting birds such as the Pallas fish eagle (Haliaetus leucoryphus) and other raptors, cranes and heron species. Forests are essential for regulating the water supply within the Indus river basin which supports important threatened aquatic reptiles and mammals such as the mugger crocodile (Crocodilus palustris) and Indus river dolphin (Platanista gangetica minor).

Ninety percent of water in Pakistan’s rivers originates from watersheds in the northern mountains. The most valuable function of forests and rangelands in Pakistan is sustained supply of sediment-free water for generation of electricity, and water supply for agriculture. Erosion and sedimentation following the loss of forests brings enormous social and political costs as a result of reduced storage capacity of reservoirs, loss of fertile soils, enhanced maintenance cost of irrigation infrastructure, reduction in agricultural and industrial production, and higher cost of production of hydro power. Non-timber forest products constitute an important resource and include medicinal and aromatic plants, mushrooms, honey, wild fruits, resin, mazri, chilgoza nuts etc.. Many rural people earn their livelihood or add to their income by collection and sale of medicinal herbs and other products. Forests and rangelands provide forage to about 90 million head of livestock.

  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azrefs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə