Photograph Archives Smithsonian American Art Museum




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Photograph Archives

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Cataloging Manual

Research and Scholars Center

Smithsonian American Art Museum


G:RSC\Image Collections\Photo Archives Cataloging Manual

Last updated 2/4/2009

Contents
Part I. General Introduction


Part II. Computer Applications: SIRIS & MARC
Part III. Cataloging Standards

Artist/Creator/Photographer (Fields 100/110, 700/710) …………….pg. 15+

Title (Fields 245, 246)………………………………………………..pg. 23+

Execution Date (Field 260)…………………………………………..pg. 29+

Dimensions (Field 300)………………………………………………pg. 30+

Media (Field 340)…………………………………………………….pg. 32+

Notes (Fields 5xx)……………………………………………………pg. 33+

Owner/Location (Field 591)………………………………………….pg. 47+

Provenance (Field 561)……………………………………………….pg. 44+

Subjects (Field 600, 610, 650)………………………………………. pg. 56+

Part IV. MARC Field Usage Summary…………………………………………pg. 68
Appendix I: Standards for Bibliographic Citations…………………………………..pg. 69-71
The following abbreviations may appear throughout this text:

HN = historical usage note

PPJ = Peter A. Juley & Son Collection

SAAM = Smithsonian American Art Museum

SIRIS = Smithsonian Institution Research Information System

Part I: General Introduction


The Photograph Archives of the Smithsonian American Art Museum contains over a quarter million photographs, negatives, and slides documenting American art. As a research and study collection, the Archives constitutes a unique visual record of American art, sometimes providing the only visual documentation of an altered, damaged or lost original. Drawing heavily from cataloging standards developed for the Art Inventories database(s), this cataloging manual was initially written for the Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, the largest collection within the Museum’s Photograph Archives--hence most examples relate to Juley materials. The manual has since been expanded to include standards pertinent to other collections as we begin digitizing and cataloging all the holdings in our archives. Brief collection summaries and histories follow.
American Sculpture Photograph Study Collection
The American Sculpture Photograph Study Collection contains 2,612 photographs of American sculpture from the late 1890s to 1940; with some printed later. The prints were originally assembled by the Metropolitan Museum of Art for study purposes from various commercial photographers, in-house staff photographers, and publishers. The collection was a gift to the Photograph Archives in 2004. This specialized research resource provides in-depth documentation for late nineteenth and early twentieth century sculptors. The collection also includes a number of rare early photographs of outdoor sculpture and public monuments.
Bernie Cleff Collection
The Bernie Cleff Collection is comprised of an estimated 1,300 photonegatives taken by noted Philadelphia freelance photographer Bernie Cleff (b. 1927) documenting sixteen outdoor monuments created by Daniel Chester French. In 1975/76, Cleff was commissioned to photograph Daniel Chester French monuments and models for a major retrospective exhibition of the sculptor’s works. Organized by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, that exhibition was shown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Nov. 4, 1976-Jan. 10, 1977), the Smithsonian American Art Museum (then called the National Collection of Fine Arts, Feb. 11-April 17, 1977), Detroit Institute of Arts (June 15-Aug. 28, 1977); and the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University (Sept. 30-November 30, 1977). Many of the photographs appear in the catalog published for that exhibition--Michael Richman’s “Daniel Chester French: An American Sculptor,” (New York: NY: Metropolitan Museum of Art for the National Trust for Historic Preservation), 1976. The Collection was received as a gift from the photographer in 2008.
Library of Congress Copyright Deposit Collection
The Library of Congress Copyright Deposit Collection holds 2,335 photomechanical reproductions documenting the works of approximately 500 American artists. The large format prints, deposited with the Library of Congress for copyright between 1890 and 1945, represent a broad range of nineteenth and twentieth century American art. Received in 1987 (through the Library’s gift & exchange transfer program), the collection documents drawings, graphic prints, paintings, and other works of art by late 19th century and early 20th century American artists. The images are in black-and-white and color; most are mounted on poster-size (22x28 inch) board. Each mount is captioned with artist, date of copyright, and title of art work.


Peter A. Juley & Son Collection
The Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, acquired by the Smithsonian in 1975, is comprised of 126,467 photographic negatives, from which black-and-white archival study prints were made. Active from 1896 to 1975, the Peter A. Juley & Son firm was a respected fine-art photography studio in New York, serving artists, museums, galleries, art dealers, private collectors, corporations, and conservators.
Peter A. Juley (1862-1937) came to the United States in 1888 from Germany, where he was a telegrapher with the post office. How he first became interested in photography is not known, but around 1896 he opened a small portrait studio in Cold Spring, New York. From 1901 to 1906, he worked as a staff photographer for Harper’s Weekly. Around 1907 he reestablished his photography business in New York City; and, a few years later, his son - Paul Juley (born 1890) became a partner. The firm was active for nearly eight decades until Paul Juley’s retirement and death in 1975.
The Peter A. Juley & Son Collection documents the works of more than 11,000 American artists, contains 4,500 portraits of artists (from formal poses to candid shots), and about 500 other miscellaneous client photographs, which include gallery exhibition installation shots and building exteriors. Also of note, because of the Juley’s pre-eminence in the field other photographers left their negatives to them to carry on the trade. Thus part of the collection predates the establishment of the Juley studio.
The Smithsonian American Art Museum acquired the Juley negatives from Paul Juley just before his death in 1975. With funding from the Getty, black-and-white archival prints were made from the negatives for the American Art Museum and the Getty. Once printed, the Juley negatives were given to Smithsonian Photographic Services to be placed in their cold storage vaults. That office, now part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives, handles all duplication requests.
[Historical note: When the Juley collection was acquired, a database was created to enter basic identification information on each negative. Information was recorded as written on the negative or envelope sleeve. Every negative was individually cataloged and each was assigned a unique eight digit number in the computer database. Up until 1998, the Juley Collection resided on a Honeywell mainframe as a SELGEM file (SELGEM is an acronym for Self-Generating Master, a special programming code written and developed by Smithsonian staff to record basic museum collections data). Nine fields of data were defined for the Juley project: artist, title, date, dimension, media, collection/owner, subject, general notes and Juley control number. In the 1990s, information on the technical processing of the negatives was entered in a separate Paradox application file and included the Juley control number, film size, type and base, storage site location, condition code/description, and indication of whether a Getty print had been made. In 1998, these two databases were merged; the data was converted from all upper case letters to mixed case and mapped to a MARC-compatible visual materials format; and then migrated to a larger institutional online accessible database -- the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System.]
Walter Rosenblum Collection
The Walter Roseblum Collection contains 7,400 black & white photographic negatives covering American and European art. The collection came to same as a gift from the photographer in 1975. An accomplished photographer and teacher, Walter Rosenblum (1919-2006) supplemented his income by doing freelance work for major New York galleries, artists and collectors from 1945 to 1970. Among Rosenblum’s clients were ACA Galleries, Graham Gallery, Matisse, New Gallery and The Contemporaries. Reflective of the period, the collection is particularly strong in American and European avant-garde, surreal and abstract works. The Collection was digitized in 2007/08 with funding provided by the Smithsonian Collection Care and Preservation Pool funding. Preliminary records based on information recorded on the negative or negative sleeve were created in SIRIS and linked to the digital images in 2009.
Part II: Computer Applications

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