Photo: Bakhchesaray, Khansaray, Crimea/ Ukraine, 2004 (J. Gierlichs) International Symposium crimea, caucasus and the volga-ural region: islamic art and architecture in the europEAn periphery sept




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Photo: Bakhchesaray, Khansaray, Crimea/ Ukraine, 2004 (J. Gierlichs)

International Symposium

CRIMEA, CAUCASUS AND THE VOLGA-URAL REGION:
ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE
IN THE europEAn PERIPHERY


Sept. 17−21, 2004

Jagdschloss Glienicke, Berlin

Convened by:
Institute of Turkic Studies, Free University Berlin


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Report
Abstracts of papers in chronological order of presentation
List of participants in alphabetical order

Ibraim A. Abdullaev Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Anifa Akhmetshina Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Kyubra Alieva Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Elena Aybabina Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Svitlana Bilyayeva Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Ninel Bokiy Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Yuriy Boltryk Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Svetlana Chervonnaya Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Bozkurt Ersoy Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Ravil Fakhrutdinov Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Oleksa Haiworonski Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Leyla Geybatova Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Joachim Gierlichs Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Zilya Imamutdinova Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Mine Kadiroğlu-Leube Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Nicole Kancal-Ferrari Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Barbara Kellner-Heinkele Biographical information

Ramazan Kereitov Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Irina Koshoridze Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Mark G. Kramarovsky Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Inci Kuyulu-Ersoy Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Fuad Pepinov Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Valeriy Sidorenko Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Nailya Velikhanly Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Valeriy Vozgrin Abstract of presentation

Biographical information



Ismet Zaatov Abstract of presentation

Biographical information


Discussants and chairpersons

Doris Behrens-Abouseif Biographical information

Marthe Bernus-Taylor Biographical information

Ernst J. Grube Biographical information

Eleanor Sims Biographical information

Ingrid Schindlbeck Biographical information

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Report –



International Symposium

Crimea, Caucasus and the Volga-Ural Region:


Islamic Art and Architecture in the European Periphery”
(Berlin, 17–21 Sept. 2004)


Barbara Kellner-Heinkele and Joachim Gierlichs, Berlin

Introductory remarks


The central areas of the Islamic world in history – North Africa, the Near East (with Asia Minor), Iran, India and Central Asia – possess a unique heritage of art and architecture from the spread of Islam to our times. Since the late nineteenth century, research on Islamic architecture and fine arts in these regions has constituted a branch in its own right within the wider discipline of art history. An impressive amount of publications, exhibitions and conferences has made this field known to an international public. Much less attention has been given to the Islamic heritage on the periphery of Europe (with the exception of south-eastern Europe), i.e. the Black Sea region, the Caucasus and the Volga-Ural region, and no conference had hitherto been devoted to the particular character of its Islamic art treasures and architectural monuments.

Therefore, the aim of the symposium was to take a closer look at these regions by offering specialists of Islamic art and architecture from the post-Soviet republics of Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan and the Russian Federation (including Russia, Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Daghestan) an opportunity to present current research and major sites as well as collections in their respective countries, and to discuss methods and problems specific to their material with colleagues from western European countries.


Preparations


With the assistance of Western and Eastern colleagues, the organizers of the symposium, Prof. Dr. Barbara Kellner-Heinkele and Dr. Joachim Gierlichs of the Institute of Turkish Studies (Institut für Turkologie), Freie Universität Berlin, contacted more than 30 art historians, archaeologists and curators of museum collections in order to gather a representative number of scholars working in different fields and concerned with different periods of Islamic art and architecture in the relevant regions. The response was very encouraging, although not all specialists invited were able to accept. On the basis of their cooperation with scholars from Ukraine and Georgia, four Turkish scholars were also invited. It must be pointed out that the number of researchers in the West focussing on Islamic art and architecture in the Crimea, the northern shore of the Black Sea, the Caucasus and the Volga-Ural region is minimal. Three specialists of Islamic art (London, Paris, New York) accepted the invitation to an encounter with colleagues working in an unfamiliar field. Unfortunately, several other colleagues were unable to attend the symposium, because a conference on Islamic manuscripts was to take place in London at the same time.

The organizers as well as the participants gratefully acknowledge the financial support of Academia Europaea, Volkswagen Foundation and Freie Universität Berlin.

In the months preceding the symposium the organizing team (including Ms. Brigitte Heuer, a specialist on Central Asia, Freie Universität Berlin) met with a number of obstacles usually not encountered during the preparation of a conference, such as bureaucratic problems in the home countries of participants, problems to obtain a visa for Germany, difficulties in contacting participants (telephone, fax and e-mail connections were sometimes difficult to establish, or participants were unavailable, because they were away on field trips). In some cases the organizers had to accept that superiors did not wish their collaborators to travel.

In order to facilitate the dialogue during the symposium, the organizers put together a booklet of paper abstracts in Russian and English complete with a CV and résumé of the main publications and research interests of the respective participants. Simultaneous translation of papers from Russian into English and English into Russian was also provided during the symposium to secure an intensive working atmosphere. Several speakers of Russian and students from the Institute of Turkic Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, lent indispensable support towards the realization of the symposium.



Since the programme was rather dense, 15 to 20 minutes were given to each paper. Most of them were accompanied by power-point or slide presentations. Lively, sometimes heated discussions followed. The contributions were not all of the same high quality, but given the enormous financial, technical and bureaucratic difficulties most participants face in their professional routine, the results and interpretations presented add up to an invaluable improvement of our knowledge of these almost unnoticed – at least in the West – research areas. This opinion was also voiced by the Western colleagues (Doris Behrens-Abouseif/London, Marthe Bernus-Taylor/Paris, Ernst J. Grube/London, Ingrid Schindlbeck/Berlin, Eleanor Sims/New York–London) who participated dedicatedly in exchanges on method and interpretation. Up to 20 colleagues and guests from academic institutions, museums and government offices in Berlin, Dresden and Halle attended the sessions.
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