Part ci. Bulletin 1508-Pupil Appraisal Handbook 1 Chapter lea responsibilities 1




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Table of Contents

Title 28

EDUCATION

Part CI. Bulletin 1508—Pupil Appraisal Handbook 1

Chapter 1. LEA Responsibilities 1

§101. Introduction 1

§103. Child Find Guidelines 1

§105. Pupil Appraisal Services 1

§107. Qualified Examiners 2

§109. Parental Participation 3

Chapter 3. Interventions and Screenings 4

§301. Response to Intervention 4

§303. School Building Level Committee 4

§305. Screening Activities 4

§307. Referral Process 7

Chapter 5. Evaluation Responsibilities 8

§501. Evaluation Coordination 8

§503. Selection of Participating Disciplines 8

§505. Procedural Responsibilities 8

§507. Evaluation Procedures 9

§509. Required Initial Individual Evaluation 10

§511. Evaluation Timelines 10

§513. Evaluation Components 10

§515. Determination of Eligibility 11

§517. Independent Educational Evaluation 12

Chapter 7. Disabilities 12

§701. Autism 12

§703. Deaf-Blindness 14

§705. Developmental Delay 14

§707. Emotional Disturbance 15

§709. Hearing Impairment 17

§711. Intellectual Disability 18

§713. Multiple Disabilities 19

§715. Orthopedic Impairment 19

§717. Other Health Impairment 20

§719. Specific Learning Disability 21

§721. Speech or Language Impairment 22

§723. Traumatic Brain Injury 23

§725. Visual Impairment 24

Chapter 9. Gifted and Talented 25

§901. Gifted 25

§903. Talented 26

Chapter 11. Reevaluation Information 27

§1101. Required Reevaluations 27

§1103. Parental Consent for Reevaluations 27

§1105. Reevaluation Procedures 27

Chapter 13. Special Services 29

§1301. Overview 29

§1303. Adapted Physical Education 29

§1305. Assistive Technology 30

Chapter 15. Related Services 31

§1501. Overview 31

§1503. Occupational Therapy 31

§1505. Orientation and Mobility 32

§1507. Physical Therapy 33

§1509. School Health Services and School Nurse Services 34

§1511. School Psychological Services 34

§1513. School Social Work Services 35

§1515. Speech-Language Pathology Services 36



Title 28

EDUCATION

Part CI. Bulletin 1508—Pupil Appraisal Handbook

Chapter 1. LEA Responsibilities

§101. Introduction

A. This handbook is the regulatory guide for pupil appraisal personnel when conducting individual evaluations of students suspected of being exceptional and in need of special education and related services, and as a reference for persons requiring specific information regarding the determination of eligibility for special education services. The reference to an exceptionality includes any disability term as well as gifted and talented.

B. The Criteria for Eligibility describes the minimal data that must be obtained in order to determine whether the student has an exceptionality and is in need of special education services. The Procedures for Evaluation specify minimal areas of data collection, and at times suggest the professional who is usually most qualified to gather and interpret the data in a certain area. Any deviations from or exceptions to procedures in this handbook shall be explained in the integrated written evaluation report.

C. The format has been revised to more sequentially reflect the steps necessary to determine if the student's responsiveness to general education interventions is sufficient to allow him/her to show progress within the general curriculum. If adequate progress is not evident, the bulletin describes the continuum of actions to be taken by the LEA through pupil appraisal personnel in determining eligibility for special education and related services.

D. This revision of Bulletin 1508 includes hyperlinks that will assist the reader in locating pertinent sections. These hyperlinks will only be active when the bulletin is viewed on-line at www.louisianaschools.net or downloaded to a computer or other electronic device for viewing.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:894 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§103. Child Find Guidelines

A. General Information

1. The Local Educational Agency (LEA) shall ensure that:

a. all students with exceptionalities residing in the district, including students with exceptionalities who are homeless children or who are wards of the state, and students with exceptionalities attending private schools, regardless of the severity of their disability, and who are in need of special education and related services, are identified, located, and evaluated; and

b. a practical method is developed and implemented to determine which students are currently receiving needed special education and related services.

2. Each LEA shall document that on-going identification activities are conducted to identify, locate, and evaluate each student who is suspected of having an exceptionality, is in need of special education and related services, and meets the criteria listed below:

a. is enrolled in an educational program operated by or under the jurisdiction of a public agency;

b. is enrolled in a private school program within the geographical jurisdiction of a public agency;

c. is enrolled in a public or private preschool or day care program; or

d. is not enrolled in a school, except for students who have graduated with a regular high school diploma.

B. Child find shall also include:

1. students who are suspected of being students with exceptionalities and in need of special education, even though they are advancing from grade to grade; and

2. highly mobile students, including migrant students.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:895 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§105. Pupil Appraisal Services

A. Pupil appraisal services comprise an integral part of the total instructional program of the LEA. The purpose of pupil appraisal services is to assist students who have academic, behavioral, and/or communication challenges, adjustment difficulties, or other special needs which are adversely impacting the student's educational performance by providing services to students, parents, teachers, and other school personnel. These services include, but are not limited to the examples provided below:

1. assistance to teachers and other school personnel in the development and implementation of behavioral and/or instructional interventions through a district's Response to Intervention (RTI) process, positive behavior support process, or other intervention processes;

2. provision of support services to non-disabled students with academic, behavioral and/or communication difficulties;

3. consultation with parents, students, teachers, and other personnel on topics such as instructional or behavioral modifications, exceptional students, and child development;

4. provision of staff development to school personnel on topics such as assessment, interventions, or child development;

5. evaluation of students to determine whether they are exceptional and in need of special education and related services;

6. interpretation of evaluation findings to school personnel and parents;

7. provision of related services to students with exceptionalities; and

8. referral to other appropriate agencies for services when warranted.

B. Pupil appraisal personnel are not limited to providing services solely to students referred for an individual evaluation. Many students experiencing academic, behavior and/or communication difficulties may be helped through recommendations made by pupil appraisal personnel for use in the general education classroom, enabling the student to benefit from instruction in the general education curriculum and eliminating the need for referral for an individual evaluation. Major functions of pupil appraisal personnel should include being child/student advocates and assisting students to remain in and profit from the general education curriculum whenever possible. When a student, as a result of an individual evaluation, qualifies for special education and related services, pupil appraisal personnel will recommend those services and supports needed to assist the teachers and parents of the student in providing appropriate special educational services in the least restrictive environment.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:895 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§107. Qualified Examiners

A. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Louisiana Revised Statutes 17:1941 et seq., require that a student suspected of being exceptional receive a comprehensive multidisciplinary evaluation conducted by qualified examiners. Qualified examiners include pupil appraisal professionals certified by the state Department of Education and professionals from other agencies or in private practice, as described in this Section.

1. Professional members of a pupil appraisal system include certified Assessment Teachers/Educational Consultants/Educational Diagnosticians, Certified School Psychologists, Qualified School Social Workers; Speech/Language Pathologists, Adapted Physical Education Teachers; Audiologists; Certified School Nurses, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapists, Speech and Hearing Therapists, and Speech/Hearing/Language Specialists.

2. LEAs shall regularly employ certified pupil appraisal personnel to conduct individual evaluations, but may also employ others as listed below:

a. qualified examiners available from the Department of Health and Hospitals, the Department of Public Safety and Corrections, the State Board Special Schools, or other public agencies;

b. private qualified examiners contracted to provide specialized assessments;

c. the student's teacher(s) as member(s) of the evaluation team;

d. a combination of the personnel listed above.

3. LEA-selected evaluators in music, theatre, or visual arts must not be employed by the LEA conducting the evaluation and must be on the state Department of Education approved evaluator list.

4. Regardless of the approach used for conducting individual evaluations, LEAs retain full responsibility for the individual evaluation. Any failure by an employee or contractor to meet the requirements of this Handbook constitutes a failure by the LEA to comply with Bulletin 1706: Regulations for the Implementation of the Children with Exceptionalities Act; R.S. 17:1941, et seq.

5. Professionals in private practice who provide evaluations for educational use must meet the standards of and comply with the rules and regulations set by their respective statutory professional boards. Certification by the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education is not required for these persons; however, Educational Assessment Teachers/Diagnosticians or Educational Consultants are required to be certified by the Department of Education, since licensing for independent practice does not exist.

a. Professionals employed by another state agency must meet the professional standards of that agency and be qualified through training to conduct evaluations.

b. The results of an evaluation conducted by these professionals may be used by an LEA in determining a student's eligibility for special educational services. It remains the LEA's responsibility to ensure that the student is evaluated and that his or her eligibility determination has been in accordance with the requirements of this handbook.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:896 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§109. Parental Participation

A. Participation by parents is crucial in all meetings in which decisions are being made regarding their child. Parents must be informed about the process used to assess their child's response to scientifically research-based interventions, appropriate strategies for improved achievement and the right to request an evaluation. Parents must be notified early enough to ensure the opportunity to participate in the meetings and discussions listed below. See Bulletin 1706 §322 for additional participation procedures:

1. school building level committee meetings when decisions are made regarding their child;

2. the evaluation team meeting to consider the results of the data and determine eligibility:

a. at the conclusion of the evaluation meeting where eligibility is determined, if the parents disagree with the consensus of the team, the LEA must afford the parents the right to challenge the evaluation report in accordance with procedural safeguards;

3. the initial individual education program (IEP) Team meeting to review evaluation results and determine special education and related services in the least restrictive environment;

4. the IEP Team meeting to discuss new concerns and to determine if a reevaluation is needed;

5. in the case of a reevaluation, to discuss the review of existing evaluation data to determine whether the student continues to have an exceptionality, and continues to need special education and related services.

B. Parental Consent for Initial Evaluations

1. The LEA proposing to conduct an initial evaluation to determine if a student qualifies as a student with an exceptionality shall, after providing notice as described in Chapter 5 of Bulletin 1706, obtain informed consent from the parent of the student before conducting the evaluation. Parents must be given a copy of their rights at the time of the request for parental consent.

a. Parental consent for initial evaluation shall not be construed as consent for initial provision of special education and related services.

b. The LEA shall make reasonable efforts to obtain the informed consent from the parent for an initial evaluation to determine whether the student is a student with an exceptionality.

2. For initial evaluations only, if the student is a ward of the state and is not residing with the student's parent, the LEA is not required to obtain informed consent from the parent for an initial evaluation to determine whether the student is a student with an exceptionality if:

a. despite reasonable efforts to do so, the LEA cannot discover the whereabouts of the parent of the student;

b. the rights of the parents of the student have been terminated in accordance with state law; or

c. the rights of the parent to make educational decisions have been subrogated by a judge in accordance with state law and consent for an initial evaluation has been given by an individual appointed by the judge to represent the student.

3. If the parent of a student enrolled in a public school or seeking to be enrolled in a public school does not provide consent for initial evaluation under Paragraph B.1 of this Section, or the parent fails to respond to a request to provide consent, the LEA may, but is not required to, pursue the initial evaluation of the student by utilizing the procedural safeguards in Chapter 5 of Bulletin 1706 (including the mediation procedures or due process procedures), if appropriate.

a. The LEA does not violate its obligation under §111 and §§302-308 of Bulletin 1706 if it declines to pursue the evaluation.

C. Parental Consent for Reevaluations

1. The LEA shall obtain informed parental consent prior to conducting any reevaluation of a student with an exceptionality.

2. If the parent refuses to consent to the reevaluation, the LEA may, but is not required to, pursue the reevaluation by using the consent override procedures described in Paragraph B.3 of this Section.

3. The LEA does not violate its obligation under §111 and §§302-308 of Bulletin 1706 if it declines to pursue the reevaluation.

4. The informed parental consent described in Paragraph C.1 of this Section need not be obtained if the LEA can demonstrate that:

a. it made reasonable efforts to obtain such consent, and

b. the student's parent has failed to respond.

D. Other Consent Requirements for Evaluations and Reevaluations

1. Parental consent is not required before:

a. reviewing existing data as part of an evaluation or a reevaluation; or

b. administering a test or other evaluation that is administered to all students unless, before administration of that test or evaluation, consent is required of parents of all students.

2. If a parent of a student who is home schooled (in a home study program) or placed in a private school by the parents at their own expense does not provide consent for the initial evaluation or the reevaluation, or the parent fails to respond to the request to provide consent, the LEA may not use the consent override procedures described in Paragraphs B.3 and C.2 of this Section:

a. the LEA is not required to consider the student eligible for services as defined in Bulletin 1706.

3. To meet the reasonable efforts requirement in Subparagraphs B.1.b, B.2.a, and C.4.a of this Section, the public agency shall document its attempts to obtain parental consent using the procedures in §322.D of Bulletin 1706.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:896 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

Chapter 3. Interventions and Screenings

§301. Response to Intervention

A. The Response to Intervention (RTI) process is a three-tiered approach to providing services and interventions to struggling learners and/or students with challenging behaviors at increasing levels of intensity. Essential components of the process include three tiers of instruction and intervention, use of standard protocols and/or problem-solving methods, and an integrated data collection/assessment system to inform decisions at each tier of instruction/intervention. The process incorporates increasing intensities of instruction and/or intervention that are provided to students in direct proportion to their individual needs. Embedded in each tier is a set of unique support structures or activities that help teachers implement, with fidelity, research-based curricula, instructional practices, and interventions designed to improve student achievement. RTI is designed for use when making decisions in both general and special education, creating a well-integrated system of instruction and intervention guided by student outcome data.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:897 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§303. School Building Level Committee

A. The School Building Level Committee (SBLC) is a general education, data driven, decision-making committee whose standing members consist of at least the principal/designee, a classroom teacher, and the referring teacher. In discussing an individual student's difficulties, the student's parent or guardian is an invited participant. The SBLC shall review and analyze all screening data, including RTI results, to determine the most beneficial option for the student. The committee's options include, but are not limited to one of the following actions.

1. Conduct no further action at this time.

2. Continue current intervention and progress monitoring through the RTI process.

3. Conduct additional interventions through the RTI process.

4. Refer the student to the appropriate committee to conduct a Section 504 evaluation.

5. Refer the student to pupil appraisal personnel for support services.

6. Refer the student to pupil appraisal personnel for an individual evaluation if an exceptionality is suspected.

B. Parents must be provided a report or summary by the SBLC on the status of the student's response to scientifically research-based interventions which would include repeated assessments of achievement at reasonable intervals, reflecting formal assessment of student progress during instruction. This report or summary must be provided to parents at least once each grading period until a decision is reached. If the parents disagree with the SBLC actions or decision, the parents must be provided a copy of their rights, which includes the right to request an evaluation. If it is the opinion of the SBLC that the student be referred for an initial evaluation, a pupil appraisal team member shall be present to review supporting documentation.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:897 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009.

§305. Screening Activities

A. Overview

1. An LEA shall identify a student, enrolled in an educational program operated by the LEA, as suspected of having a disability only after the student has participated in an RTI process that produces data sufficient for the SBLC to recommend that a comprehensive individual evaluation be conducted by pupil appraisal personnel. For a student suspected of having a communication disorder, follow the screening activities in §305.D.1-3. For a child not enrolled in school, screening activities are to be conducted by Pupil Appraisal personnel. Through the RTI process the SBLC shall coordinate and document results of all screening activities described below. RTI and screening activities for enrolled students (public and private) are conducted by general education personnel with assistance from other school personnel and pupil appraisal members, if necessary.

2. The screening of a student by a teacher or specialist to determine appropriate instructional strategies for curriculum implementation shall not be considered to be an evaluation for eligibility for special education and related services.

B. Sensory Screening

1. Hearing Screening

a. Hearing screening shall be conducted unless the following three conditions are true.

i. Normal screening results have been obtained within the past 24 months for enrolled students and within the past 12 months for non-enrolled students.

ii. No hearing problems are currently being exhibited by the student.

iii. There is no history of acute or chronic ear infections or persistent head colds indicated in the health screening.

b. The student is considered "at-risk" of having a hearing impairment when one of the following conditions exist:

i. failure to respond at 20db in one of 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz or 4000 Hz frequencies in at least one ear;

ii. middle ear pressure outside the range of  200 and +50 mm H2O in either ear; or

iii. excessively stiff or flaccid tympanogram in either ear.

c. Students for whom specific audiometric test results cannot be obtained because of age or degree of involvement or for whom informal hearing test results do not rule out the possibility of a hearing loss should be considered “at risk.” The extent of the student’s hearing loss must be determined, using electrophysiological techniques when necessary.

2. Vision Screening

a. Vision screening shall be conducted unless the following three conditions are true.

i. Normal screening results have been achieved within the past 24 months for enrolled students and within the past 12 months for non-enrolled children.

ii. No vision problems are currently being exhibited by the student.

iii. There is no history of eye infections, either acute or chronic, indicated in the health screening.

b. A student's vision is considered "at risk" as dictated by the criteria in the manual of the instrument used for testing. Vision screening must include tests for the following three conditions:

i. acuity (near point and far point);

ii. color blindness; and

iii. muscle balance.

c. When the required techniques are unsuccessful because of the student's immaturity, physical impairment, or intellectual ability, adapted methods of testing shall be used to determine the extent of the loss.

3. Sensory Processing Screening

a. Sensory processing screening is conducted to determine if a student is "at risk" for sensory processing difficulties. (Refer to the Sensory Processing Screening Checklist in the Appendix for further guidance.) Sensory processing concerns may include the following:

i. visual symptoms;

ii. auditory symptoms;

iii. tactile symptoms;

iv. vestibular (balance) symptoms;

v. olfactory (smell) symptoms;

vi. gustatory (taste) symptoms;

vii. proprioceptive (movement) symptoms;

viii. motor planning difficulties; or

ix. attention/arousal difficulties.

C. Health Screening

1. Health screening is conducted to determine the health status of the student.

2. A student's health is considered "at risk" if through history, observation, or other procedures, health concerns are noted.

D. Speech and Language Screening

1. Speech and language screening is conducted by a speech-language pathologist unless the following four conditions are true as documented by a teacher-completed checklist of communication skills.

a. The student exhibits normal voice quality.

b. The student speaks with normal rate and fluency.

c. The student's articulation skills appear normal with respect to age and social/cultural factors.

d. The student's overall receptive and expressive language skills appear adequate with respect to age and social/cultural factors.

2. The tasks, items, or tests used in screening should include a sampling to determine the following pertinent skills or conditions:

a. auditory processing skills (e.g., reception, discrimination);

b. articulation;

c. receptive and expressive language;

d. voice;

e. fluency;

f. oral motor functioning; and

g. oral structure.

3. If the student’s communication skills are "at risk," evidence-based interventions shall be conducted by a speech-language pathologist or other appropriate personnel with fidelity and for the length of time necessary to obtain sufficient data to determine their effectiveness. Informed parental consent must be obtained before conducting these interventions. In the case of a suspected voice impairment, there must also be an assessment conducted by an appropriate medical specialist prior to implementing the interventions.

E. Motor Screening

1. Motor screening is accomplished through the observation of the student's gross and fine motor skills by the teacher responsible for providing physical education to the student and, if necessary, in consultation with the teacher responsible for classroom-based activities. The evaluation coordinator shall ensure that motor screening is conducted by pupil appraisal personnel during the evaluation for students not enrolled in school.

2. A student's gross or fine motor skills are considered "at risk" if the screening results indicate concerns in the following areas:

a. lack of strength, endurance, flexibility;

b. difficulty with balance activities;

c. failure to show opposition of limbs when walking, sitting, or throwing;

d. lack of control with ball skills;

e. difficulty in crossing the vertical midline;

f. poor sense of body awareness; or

g. difficulty in demonstrating motor sequences.

F. Assistive Technology Screening

1. Assistive Technology screening is conducted through an observation of the student's skills and educational environment. (See Appendix for the Louisiana Assistive Technology Screening Checklist for further guidance.)

2. A student's functional capabilities should be considered "at risk" if the screening results indicate concerns in the following areas:

a. physical functioning/motor abilities;

b. fine motor skills;

c. communication functioning;

d. vision/hearing;

e. academic functioning;

f. recreation and leisure;

g. vocational functioning;

h. general health; or

i. self-help.

G. Social/Emotional/Behavioral Screening

1. Social/emotional/behavioral screening should include, at a minimum, a review of:

a. incident reports/discipline records;

b. teacher reports;

c. parent reports and information provided by the parent;

d. developmental profiles;

e. previous behavior intervention plans; and

f. anecdotal records.

2. If a review indicates current concerns in the above areas, the student's social/emotional/behavioral status is "at risk." Documented, evidence-based intervention(s) appropriate to the student's age and behavioral difficulties shall be conducted with fidelity for the length of time necessary to obtain sufficient data to determine their effectiveness. Interventions are required for students with a suspected emotional disturbance unless there is substantial documentation that the student is likely to injure him/her self or others.

H. Educational Screening

1. Educational screening is accomplished by conducting:

a. a review of the results of the student's educational history;

i. for a preschool-aged child not in school, a developmental screening shall be conducted by pupil appraisal personnel prior to or during the evaluation;

ii. for a preschool-aged child enrolled in school, a developmental screening shall be conducted by the student's teacher;

b. a review of the student's academic performance, including dyslexia screening results and results of applicable statewide and district-wide tests;

c. a summary of the teacher/parent communication regarding the student's specific difficulties or exceptional skills;

d. a review of the results of universal screening, conducted by the teacher or other staff member, which enables school personnel to measure the performance of students as compared to peers within their class, school, and/or district; and

e. a comprehensive and documented review of evidence-based intervention(s) conducted with fidelity and for the length of time necessary to obtain sufficient data to determine their effectiveness. Interventions should be appropriate to the student’s age and academic skill deficits:

i. interventions are required for students suspected of having autism, developmental delay, emotional disturbance, mild intellectual disability, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment, and specific learning disability. Interventions are not required for a preschool-aged child, a student suspected of being gifted or talented, or a student suspected of having a severe or low incidence impairment.

I. Gifted and Talented Screening

1. Gifted. Based on universal screenings that monitor student progress in the core curriculum, students functioning at the highest levels should be considered for gifted screening (refer to Chapter 9 for further screening requirements).

2. Talented. Based on advanced skills demonstrated by the student in visual arts, music, or theatre, the student should be considered for talent screening (Refer to Chapter 9 for further screening requirements).

J. Other Considerations

1. The SBLC must provide data-based documentation that the student's lack of educational progress is not primarily due to:

a. lack of appropriate, explicit and systematic instruction in reading which includes the essential components of reading instruction: phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary; (e.g., if more than 50 percent of the class falls below benchmark on universal screening, lack of appropriate instruction might be suspected);

b. lack of appropriate instruction in math (e.g., if more than 50 percent of the class falls below benchmark on universal screening, lack of appropriate instruction might be suspected);

c. limited English proficiency; (for students identified as English Language Learners, refer to Louisiana Guidelines for Identification and Instruction of English Language Learners with Disabilities for additional information);

d. environmental or economic disadvantage (e.g., if a majority of low income students in the class fall below benchmark on universal screening, environmental or economic disadvantage as a primary factor might be suspected); or

e. cultural factors (e.g., for students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, there is evidence that the school and classroom teacher have been sensitive toward the students’ diverse learning needs).

2. When data indicate that the student is not responding to the intervention, the SBLC shall consider other options within the RTI process. The SBLC shall provide, at a minimum, evidence that a scientifically research-based intervention was implemented with fidelity, the student's progress was monitored at reasonable intervals, and the student's rate of progress relative to peers was not adequate.

3. For students who are found to be "at risk" in any of the screening areas listed above, but are not suspected of having an exceptionality, the SBLC shall conduct interventions or refer the student to the appropriate specialist to address the concern.

4. For students who are found to be "at risk" in any of the screening areas listed above and are suspected of having an exceptionality, the evaluation coordinator shall ensure that the screening areas determined to be "at risk" are addressed in the individual evaluation.

AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 17:1941 et seq.

HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35:898 (May 2009), effective July 1, 2009, amended LR 42:400 (March 2016).

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