Parsely Family Carrot carrot




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Parsely Family

Carrot



carrot (kàr¹et), common name for some members of the Umbelliferae (also called parsley family), a family of mainly perennial or biennial herbs of north temperate areas. Most are typified by aromatic foliage, a dry fruit that splits when mature, and an umbellate inflorescence (in which the floret stems of the flattened flower cluster arise from the same point, like an umbrella). The seeds and leaves of many of these herbs are used for seasoning or as greens, e.g., ANISE, CARAWAY, CORIANDER, CUMIN, DILL, FENNEL, and PARSLEY. The carrot, CELERY, and PARSNIP are commercially important vegetables. The common carrot (Daucus carota sativa) is a root crop, probably derived from the wild carrot (or QUEEN ANNE'S LACE). Carrots are rich in carotene (vitamin A), especially when cooked; in antiquity they were used medicinally. Some types, e.g., button snakeroot and sweet cicely, are used as aromatic ornamentals. A few members of the family, e.g., POISON HEMLOCK, produce lethal poisons.

caraway,


biennial Old World plant (Carum carvi) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), cultivated in Europe and North America for its aromatic seeds. They are small and ovate, with a pleasant spicy flavor, and are used as a condiment; as seasoning of pastry and bread doughs, cabbage, sausage, and some kinds of cheese; and as flavoring for certain liqueurs (as kümmel). The volatile oil expressed from the seeds is a stimulant and a carminative. Caraway is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Umbellales, family Umbelliferae.
celery,


biennial plant (Apium graveolens) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), of wide distribution in the wild state throughout the north temperate Old World and much cultivated also in America. It was first cultivated as a medicinal, then (during the Middle Ages) as a flavoring, and finally as a food, chiefly for soups and salads. The seeds are still used

for seasoning. Celeriac is a variety cultivated chiefly in N Europe for the large edible turniplike root. Celery is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Umbellales, family Umbelliferae



anise


Pronounced As: anis , annual plant (Pimpinella anisum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), native to the Mediterranean region but long cultivated elsewhere for its aromatic and medicinal qualities. It has flat-topped clusters of small yellow or white flowers that become seedlike fruits-the aniseed of commerce, used in food flavoring. Anise oil is derived from the seeds and sometimes from the leaves; it is also obtained from the star anise, an unrelated woody plant. The oil, composed chiefly of anethole, is used in medicinals, dentifrices, perfumes, beverages, and, in drag hunting, to scent a trail for dogs in the absence of a fox. The anise of the Bible (Mat. 23.23) is dill, a plant of the same family. Anisette is an anise-flavored liqueur. Anise is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.

anise

anise (àn¹îs), annual plant (Pimpinella anisum) of the CARROT family, native to the Mediterranean but widely cultivated for its aromatic and medicinal qualities. The seedlike fruits (aniseed) are used as flavoring and provide anise oil, which is used in medicinals, perfumes, beverages, and dentifrices. Biblical anise is DILL.

parsley,


Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish. In ancient times parsley was also used for chaplets and as a funeral decoration. Hamburg parsley is a variety grown for its edible root. Parsley is widely cultivated throughout the United States, chiefly in Louisiana. Parsley is often eaten because of its high content of vitamin C. Parsley is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae).
coriander


Pronounced As: korandr , strong-smelling Old World annual herb (Coriandrum sativum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), cultivated for its fruits. Dried coriander seed contains an aromatic oil used as a flavoring, as a medicine, and in liqueurs. The seed itself is used as a spice similarly to that of the related caraway and cumin. Coriander is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae

cumin


or cummin Pronounced As: both: kumin , low annual herb (Cuminum cyminum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), long cultivated in the Old World for the aromatic seedlike fruits. The fruits resemble the related caraway and are similarly used in cooking. Cumin is an ingredient of curry powder; the oil is used for liqueurs and in veterinary practice and was formerly used in medicine. Cumin is mentioned in the Bible. For black cumin, see love-in-a-mist. Cumin is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Umbellales, family Umbelliferae.

dill,


Old World annual or biennial plant (Anethum graveolens) of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), cultivated since at least since 400 B.C. The pungent, aromatic leaves and seeds are used for pickling and for flavoring sauces, salads, and soups. Dill water (a carminative) and oil of dill are made from the seeds. Dill was formerly used in charms against witchcraft. Dill is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.

fennel,


common name for several perennial herbs, genus Foeniculum vulgare of the family Umbelliferae (parsley family), related to dill. The strawlike foliage and the seeds are licorice-scented and are used (especially in Italian cooking) for flavoring. Sweet fennel, or finocchio, is a variety with a thick, bulb-based stalk eaten like celery. In literature and legend fennel is a symbol of flattery, a remedy for failing eyesight, and an aphrodisiac. Its inflorescence is a flat-topped umbel of yellow florets. Fennel-flower, a member of the buttercup family, also produces aromatic seeds. The dog fennels are members of the family Asteraceae (aster family). Fennel is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.



parsnip

(pär¹snîp´), garden plant (Pastinaca sativa) of the CARROT family native to the Old World and cultivated since ancient times for its long, fleshy, edible root.


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