New Brunswick ", as well as support behind naming "




Yüklə 186.03 Kb.
səhifə1/3
tarix17.04.2016
ölçüsü186.03 Kb.
  1   2   3
name "New Brunswick", as well as support behind naming "Prince Edward Island" for a representative of the Braunschweiger dynasty.

In 1749, the British colony of Nova Scotia was almost completely populated by 10,000 French-speaking and Roman Catholic Acadians. This was felt to be a great problem by the British administrators of the area, especially Charles Cornwallis, the 1st Marquess Cornwallis. Attracting British immigrants was difficult as most preferred to go to the warmer southern colonies. Thus, a plan was developed to aggressively recruit foreign Protestants. These came mostly from German duchies and principalities on the Upper Rhine in the present-day Rhineland-Palatinate bundesländer. The duchy of Württemberg was the major source, but there were also "Foreign Protestants" from Montbéliard in France, and parts of Switzerland and the Netherlands.

This recruiting drive was led by John Dick, who was quite successful. The British government agreed to provide free passage to the colony, as well as free land and one year's rations upon arrival. Over 2,000 of the "Foreign Protestants" arrived between 1750 and 1752, on 11 ships:


  • Aldernay/Nancy (1750)

  • Ann (1750)

  • Gale (1751)

  • Speedwell (1751)

  • Pearl (1751)

  • Murdoch (1751)

  • Speedwell (1752)

  • Betty (1752)

  • Sally (1752)

  • Pearl (1752)

  • Gale (1752)

The immigrants almost all disembarked at Halifax, where they were put in temporary quarters before being shipped to other areas of the colony.

Most of the foreign Protestants settled along the South Shore between Liverpool and Halifax. The area is still inhabited by their descendants, and last names like Hirtle, Ernst, or the various ways to spell Rhodeniser are common. Many towns such as Lunenburg, Kingsburg, and Waterloo bear distinctly German names. Many of the names of islands, beaches, and points are also German.



Foreign Protestants (1750-1752)

 

Many passengers on the ships were listed as being from Montbeliard. At the time, Montbeliard was still an independent "Countship" (or "Principality") and not yet a part of France (until 1793).



Cornwallis, in a letter to the Lords of Trade and Plantations dated 24 July 1749, had written: "there are amongst the settlers a few Swiss who are regular honest and industrious men, easily governed and work heartily: I hope your Lordships will think of a method of encouraging numbers of them to come over. A proposal was sent me when at Spithead which might perhaps answer the purpose, to make it known through Germany, that all Husbandmen, tradesmen or soldiers being protestants, should have the same rights & privileges in this province as were promised on his Majestys Proclamation to his natural born subjects, besides which, at their embarking at Rotterdam or Plymouth, or at their arrival here (as your Lordships shall think proper) each man should receive 40sh. or 50sh., and 10sh. for every person in his family, they to be at the charge of their own passage." (Nova Scotia Documents, p 565)

The Lords of Trade replied in a letter to Cornwallis from Whitehall, dated 16 October 1749, "We entirely agree with you in opinion that a mixture of Foreign Protestants would by their industriousness and exemplary dispositions greatly promote and forward the settlement in its infancy and we shall endeavour to fall upon some measure of sending over a considerable body the next year." (Nova Scotia Documents, p 588)

Lords of Trade, in a letter to Cornwallis dated 16 Feb 1750: "We must however acquaint you that we have been empowered by His Majesty to enter into contact for such a number of Foreign Protestants, and on such terms as we shall judge proper, and accordingly made an agreement with a Merchant in Holland for the transportation of a number not exceeding 1500, and have assurance from him of success in his undertaking." (Nova Scotia Documents, p 602)

Cornwallis to Lords of Trade, 19 March 1750: "Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to hear that your Lordships have fallen upon some means of sending over Germans and other foreign Protestants". (Nova Scotia Documents, p 607)

Lords of Trade to Cornwallis, Whitehall, 8 June 1750: "Mr. Dick merchant at Rotterdam, who undertook to transport a thousand Foreign Protestants upon the condition of our paying him a Guinea for each person has greatly disappointed us, but by a letter we have this day received from him he acquaints us, that he shall send two hundred and eighty and that half of them are already on board, and he gives us some hopes that he shall send over another ship this year." (Nova Scotia Documents, p 612.)

By the 26 June 1750, the Lords were able to write that Mr Dick had finally met with success, and that the ship Ann was embarking for Halifax with the first load.

 

Governor Shirley of Massachusetts, however, remained cautious about the introduction of these settlers up in Nova Scotia. In a letter to Colonel Lawrence 13 March 1756 from Boston, he writes:



"As to the settlement of Germans at Lunenburg if the End of posting the 152 men there, which I find by your return of the cantonment of the troops are plac'd there at present, is to be a guard upon the Inhabitants of that town, the Province had better be without the Settlemt. unless an equal number at least of settlers, whose fidelity to his Majesty's government may be depended on, can be soon introduced among them: otherwise the more that Settlement increases, the more dangerous and burthensome it will grow to the province: and this instance seems to shew the risque of making entire settlements of Foreigners of any kind in so new a Government as Nova Scotia, without a due mixture of natural born subjects among them."

 

Source:



Smith, Leonard H., Jr, Dictionary of Immigrants to Nova Scotia, Vol I, Clearwater, Florida, Owl Books, 1985.
Akins, Thomas Beamish, editor, "List of the Settlers Who Came Out with Governor Cornwallis to Chebucto, in June 1749". In "Selections from the Public Documents of the Province of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS: Charles Annand, 1869, pp 506-557. Reprint, Cottonport, Louisiana: Polyanthos, 1973 under the title "Acadia and Nova Scotia: Documents Relating to the Acadian French and the First British Colonisation of the Province, 1714-1758", p 435, 565, and others as noted.

 

 



Letter from John Dick / Lords of Trade to Cornwallis - 1750

 

"We have received a letter from Mr. Dick dated the 27th June NS, acquainting us that the Ship Ann, John Spurrier, Master, has sailed from Helvoetslys with 312 foreign Portestants on board, a list whereof we herewith enclose to you, together with a copy of Mr. Dick's instructions to the master of the ship."



Mr. Dick in his letter acquaints us that there is a German gentleman on board, John Eberhard Klages, is a man of Fortune and Figure in his own country, that he has paid the passage of sixteen people and a boy on condition that they are to give him their fifty acres of land each and to continue with him and cultivate it.

We recommend this gentleman to your particular countenance and regard, as you must be sensible that his favorable representation of his reception and the state of the settlement to his countrymen will be a great inducement to others to resort to the Province and when the settlers who have engaged to convey their fifty acres to him shall have cultivated them according to their engagement with him we see no reason why you should not make fresh grants to them.

We don't doubt but you will receive all these foreign Protestants in general in kindest manner as our procuring a large number next year will depend upon the accounts they send home.

We find that Mr. Dick has desired Mr. Davidson to take upon him the management of his concerns and we desire that you will take care that affairs will be so managed that Mr. Dick may not be a sufferer with respect to the money which he has advanced for those who were not able to pay their own passage, as there may not be among the old settlers a sufficient number of Persons able and willing to take off such a number of Servants upon the terms of paying for their passage; you may possibly contrive to lay down the money upon their engaging to work it out in the Public works, and that you may even make use of this opportunity to reduce the exorbitant price of labour.

We cannot make any objection to Mr. Davidson's taking the 5 per cent which Mr. Dick offers him, as this is in some degree a private transaction between them, but at the same time we must observe that in a public light it might be an encouragement to Mr. Dick who has acted in this affair with great diligence and spirit, if the Secretary was directed to transact this business as part of the duty of his office without Commission, so we bid you hearty farewell, and are,

Your very loving friends,

Dunk Halifax
Dupplin
J. Grenville

Lords of Trade to Cornwallis, 26 June 1750, Nova Scotia Documents, p 615.)

Source:

Akins, Thomas Beamish, editor, "List of the Settlers Who Came Out with Governor Cornwallis to Chebucto, in June 1749". In "Selections from the Public Documents of the Province of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS: Charles Annand, 1869, pp 506-557. Reprint, Cottonport, Louisiana: Polyanthos, 1973 under the title "Acadia and Nova Scotia: Documents Relating to the Acadian French and the First British Colonisation of the Province, 1714-1758", p 615-616..

http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/Migrations/english/hhs/john.html

En 1749, la Chambre de commerce de Londres m'a chargé de recruter des colons pour la Nouvelle-Écosse. Dieu que j'avais encore beaucoup à apprendre alors ! Mais voilà que cinq bateaux transportant mille âmes en partance pour Halifax viennent maintenant de quitter le port de Rotterdam, près de l'embouchure du Rhin. Ma meilleure année jusqu'ici ! Cela n'a pas toujours été un commerce lucratif - au contraire, j'y ai perdu de l'argent, mais je ne perds pas espoir de me refaire dans les années qui viennent, maintenant que les choses vont bien. Il y a trois ans, j'étais un jeune négociant ici à Rotterdam. Voyant tant d'Européens de l'Est partir pour les colonies d'Amérique en transitant par ce port, je n'ai plus eu de cesse que je ne prenne moi aussi part à cette entreprise.

La Chambre de commerce m'avait autorisé à faire des démarches auprès de protestants étrangers, candidats à devenir sujets britanniques. Chaque homme se verrait attribuer 50 acres de terre en Nouvelle-Écosse, plus 10 acres pour chaque personne à charge, femme ou enfant, plus d'autres parcelles encore lorsque les familles auraient grandi ou qu'elles seraient capables d'en cultiver davantage. Leur subsistance serait également assurée pendant 12 mois et on leur fournirait tous les outils, armes et matériaux de construction dont ils auraient besoin.

J'ai ordonné à mes agents de remonter le Rhin jusque dans les régions protestantes d'Allemagne, de Suisse et de France. L'intérêt suscité, me rapportèrent-ils, a été grand, le plus grave problème étant que la plupart des gens qui auraient consenti à émigrer n'avaient pas de quoi payer leur passage. Il n'était cependant pas rare que, pour payer leur passage, les futures colons des colonies d'Amérique s'engagent à contrat dès leur arrivée auprès de fermiers ou de commerçants locaux qui réglaient alors pour eux le prix de la traversée. Selon ma formule à moi, les colons régleraient leur passage en travaillant pour le gouvernement de la colonie. Ils seraient ainsi mieux traités que les nouveaux venus dans les colonies plus anciennes. Le gouverneur avait certes besoin de bras pour construire des fortifications et d'autres ouvrages de travaux publics. Et cela devait me donner un avantage sur mes rivaux.

Mes rivaux ! Ils font tout ce qu'ils peuvent pour me frustrer du fruit de mes efforts et refroidir l'ardeur de mes futurs colons néo-écossais. Ils rencontrent les immigrants qui descendent le Rhin et, se faisant passer pour mes agents, leur font signer des contrats après les avoir découragés en prétendant que la Nouvelle-Écosse est une terre de malédiction où ils devront affronter Français et Indiens. Ils persuadent les membres de mes expéditions d'aller plutôt en Pennsylvanie ou en Caroline. Certaines des histoires qu'ils racontent sont même imprimées dans des journaux. Ils vont jusqu'à dénigrer mes efforts de recrutement auprès de la Chambre de commerce de Londres.

Devant tant d'adversité, je n'ai pu, il y a deux ans (1750), envoyer qu'un seul bateau de colons, le Ann.

Sans perdre de temps, je me suis lancé dans les préparatifs de l'année suivante. Six agents ont fait pour moi du recrutement en Allemagne, en Suisse et en France. Je me suis procuré des passeports auprès des autorités prussiennes et hollandaises pour accélérer le transport de mes recrues par le Rhin. J'ai également pris des dispositions pour améliorer les conditions de transport de celles-ci par bateau. Ainsi, par exemple, j'ai fait installer des aérateurs sur les bateaux et modifier les cargaisons de vivres pour les rendre plus convenables aux personnes peu habituées à consommer des aliments salés. Je me suis également assuré que l'on embarque des provisions d'eau supplémentaires. Mais, malgré cela, il est toujours à craindre qu'un certain nombre de passagers ne verront jamais Halifax tant le voyage est long -- plus de trois mois -- et pénible. On peut seulement espérer minimiser les pertes.

L'année dernière (1751), j'ai expédié à Halifax quatre bateaux de recrues et, des 1 004 personnes qui se sont embarquées, 918 ont survécu au voyage.

Dès que ces bateaux-là ont quitté Rotterdam, je me suis, cette fois encore, rapidement mis aux préparatifs de la saison suivante. Or, voilà que, fin décembre, la Chambre de commerce de Londres m'annonce abruptement que les autorités britanniques ne souhaitent pas envoyer de nouvelles recrues protestantes en Nouvelle-Écosse cette année ! J'avais déjà démarché environ mille nouvelles recrues, dont certaines avaient commencé à vendre leurs biens en prévision de leur départ. Après discussion, il a été convenu que j'envoie ces 1 000 immigrants additionnels si, une fois à destination, ceux-ci acceptent de travailler pour un shilling par jour pour payer leur passage, et de toucher trois pence par jour pour acheter leurs moyens de subsistance sur le marché local, au lieu de les obtenir gratuitement des agents gouvernementaux. C'est ce que j'ai finalement fait au mois de juin dernier (1752) en affrétant cinq bateaux.

P.S. : Le contrat de John Dick avec la Chambre de commerce de Londres a été résilié pour de bon vers la fin de 1752.

http://www.geocities.com/~wallyg/early.htm#Early%20Protestant%20Settlers%20Had%20Terrible%20Time%20in%20Nova%20Scotia

The first settlers of Lunenburg were primarily German speaking Protestants from various parts of Germany, Switzerland, and the Montbeliard region of France who were invited by the British to settle in Nova Scotia in an attempt to counterbalance the French presence in the province. The British Government mapped out the old town on a strict grid and gave each family a lot.

1771-1800 (Volume IV)



CORNWALLIS, EDWARD, officier, administrateur colonial et fondateur de Halifax, né le 22 février 1712/1713 à Londres, sixième fils de Charles Cornwallis, 4e baron Cornwallis, et de lady Charlotte Butler, fille de Richard Butler, 1er comte d’Arran : il épousa le 17 mars 1753, à Londres, Mary, fille de Charles Townshend, 2e vicomte Townshend ; décédé le 14 janvier 1776 à Gibraltar.

      Nés dans une famille aux relations influentes, Edward Cornwallis et son frère jumeau, Frederick, devinrent pages du roi à l’âge de 12 ans. Capitaine dans le 8e d’infanterie en 1734, Cornwallis servit de courrier pour le service diplomatique, entre 1738 et 1743, et devint major du 20e d’infanterie en 1742. En décembre 1743, son père le nomma pour représenter au parlement la circonscription familiale d’Eye. L’année suivante, il rallia son régiment dans les Flandres et en assuma le commandement quand le lieutenant-colonel fut tué à Fontenoy (Belgique) en 1745. Promu lieutenant-colonel du 20e régiment cette même année, Cornwallis participa à la « pacification » de l’Écosse, y compris au quasi-massacre de Culloden, avant que son mauvais état de santé ne le forçât à résigner son commandement en faveur du major Wolfe* en 1748. L’année précédente, il avait été nommé valet de la chambre du roi et, en mars 1749, il fut promu colonel.

      La carrière de Cornwallis en Nouvelle-Écosse commença le 21 juin 1749, date à laquelle il arriva au large de la baie de Chibouctou sur le sloop Sphinx comme gouverneur nouvellement nommé de cette province. Sa nomination inaugurait une nouvelle politique du gouvernement britannique. Pendant des années les autorités de la métropole avaient négligé la Nouvelle-Écosse, possession britannique depuis 1713. Cependant, la guerre de la Succession d’Autriche en démontra l’importance stratégique. Afin d’assurer la sécurité des colonies de la Nouvelle-Angleterre, des troupes anglo-américaines dirigées par William Pepperrell* et Peter Warren* attaquèrent et prirent la forteresse française de Louisbourg, île Royale (île du Cap-Breton), en 1745. Quoique le traité d’Aix-la-Chapelle en 1748 rendît Louisbourg à la France en échange de Madras (Inde), le gouvernement britannique comprit vraiment qu’ « il était essentiel de donner à cette région une base militaire britannique d’un effectif comparable pour faire contrepoids et protéger la Nouvelle-Angleterre et son commerce ».

      On mena cette entreprise, consistant à établir des colons britanniques dans la province, avec une rapidité saisissante. En mars 1749, lord Halifax, président du Board of Trade, soumit un rapport au duc de Bedford, secrétaire d’État pour le département du Sud, proposant la fondation d’une ville dans la baie de Chibouctou, « le grand et long port » sur la rive sud de la presqu’île dont on connaissait déjà bien le potentiel. Halifax avait reçu des suggestions au sujet du plan d’établissement de différentes sources au courant de la situation en Nouvelle-Écosse, parmi lesquelles l’influence la plus remarquable était celle de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. En fait, il estimait que, la paix acquise, la raison la plus importante pour établir la nouvelle ville était de répondre aux griefs de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. Toutefois, on fit le recrutement des premiers colons en Grande-Bretagne. Ce printemps-là, des annonces alléchantes parurent dans les journaux invitant les gens à se porter volontaires pour aller s’établir en Nouvelle-Écosse. On promettait aux futurs colons le transport gratuit et des vivres pour un an ; deux régiments de la garnison de Louisbourg commandée par le colonel Peregrine Thomas Hopson* devaient fournir une protection militaire. En mai, Cornwallis et 2 576 colons se mettaient en route pour cette province.

      Le premier problème auquel Cornwallis se heurta à son arrivée fut de choisir l’endroit précis de l’établissement : cette décision lui causa certaines difficultés. Le commodore Charles Knowles, ancien gouverneur de Louisbourg, et le capitaine Thomas Durell, qui avait dressé la carte de certaines parties de la Nouvelle-Écosse, avaient recommandé la haute falaise surplombant le bassin de Bedford (le fond de la baie, rebaptisée ainsi en l’honneur du duc de Bedford) mais ce lieu se trouvait trop à l’intérieur des terres pour convenir à Cornwallis. D’aucuns en Angleterre avaient suggéré l’endroit qui s’appelle aujourd’hui la pointe Pleasant, à l’embouchure du port, mais Cornwallis s’y refusa, à cause de la terre rocailleuse et de l’éventualité de mers houleuses en hiver ; de même, il écarta la proposition suggérant le côté du port où se trouve Dartmouth, parce que le terrain opposé, plus élevé, dominait cet emplacement. Finalement, il choisit le flanc d’une colline sur le côté ouest de la baie, qui commandait toute la presqu’île, pour le nouvel établissement nommé Halifax en l’honneur du président du Board of Trade. Sa situation avait comme avantages la pente douce de la colline (baptisée plus tard Citadel Hill), l’emplacement convenant à l’accostage de bateaux, l’excellent mouillage pour de plus grands navires près de la côte ainsi qu’une bonne terre. Suivant les termes d’Archibald McKellar MacMechan*, « le temps a ratifié la sagesse du choix de [Cornwallis] ».

      Grâce à l’arrivée du gouverneur intérimaire, Paul Mascarene*, et de certains de ses conseillers d’Annapolis Royal, Cornwallis fut à même de former son gouvernement. Le 14 juillet 1749, son premier conseil, comprenant entre autres Mascarene, John Gorham* et Benjamin Green, prêta serment. Selon sa commission et ses instructions, Cornwallis ne devait édicter de lois qu’avec le consentement d’un conseil et d’une chambre d’Assemblée mais le Board of Trade admit que, dans les circonstances, il était impossible de convoquer une assemblée. Pour des raisons diverses, on n’en forma une qu’en 1758 sous le gouverneur Charles Lawrence*. Les premières lois du nouveau gouvernement eurent tendance à suivre les modèles de la Virginie qui avaient influencé les précédents gouvernements de la Nouvelle-Écosse. De même, pour créer un système judiciaire, Cornwallis prit exemple sur celui de la Virginie ; il établit une Cour générale pour traiter des délits graves et une Cour de comté pour les délits mineurs.

      Cependant, la principale préoccupation du gouverneur fut de rendre l’établissement habitable avant l’hiver. En dépit des difficultés, il put rendre compte de progrès soutenus. Le 24 juillet, il adressa au Board of Trade des plans détaillés de la ville et, le 20 août, annonça qu’il y avait eu tirage au sort des lots et que chaque colon savait où il devait construire. Déjà, bien des gens de Louisbourg étaient arrivés et d’autres arrivaient de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. À la mi-septembre, les soldats avaient formé une ligne de palissades et, en octobre, avaient terminé deux des forts. Dès septembre, Cornwallis avait exprimé sa satisfaction parce que « tout se passait très bien, en fait beaucoup mieux qu’on aurait pu l’espérer ». S’il se plaignait de l’« irrégularité et l’indolence » de nombre de colons, pour la plupart soldats et marins licenciés, il vantait les quelques Suisses parmi eux qui lui apparaissaient comme des « hommes honnêtes et laborieux, facilement dirigés et [qui] travaillent avec ardeur ». Par la suite, le Board of Trade décida d’envoyer un « mélange de protestants étrangers », qui « par leurs dispositions industrieuses et exemplaires favoriseraient grandement cet établissement dans ses débuts », mais, d’après Cornwallis, le premier groupe envoyé en 1750 était « dans l’ensemble de pauvres vieux diables ». D’autres Suisses et d’autres Allemands arrivèrent pendant le mandat de Cornwallis ; en 1753, ils établirent leur propre village à Lunenburg [V. Jean Pettrequin* ; Sebastian Zouberbuhler].

      En plus de ses problèmes à Halifax, Cornwallis eut des difficultés encore bien plus grandes. En octobre 1749, le gouverneur intérimaire de la Nouvelle-France, Rolland-Michel Barrin* de La Galissonière, envoya des forces armées sous la direction de Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Louis de La Corne* à la rivière Saint-Jean (Nouveau-Brunswick) et à l’isthme de Chignectou, espérant ainsi limiter l’établissement britannique. L’année suivante, Cornwallis envoya Lawrence dans l’isthme à la tête d’un détachement pour consolider les droits britanniques sur la région ; après un affrontement avec La Corne en avril, Lawrence érigea le fort Lawrence (près d’Amherst, Nouvelle-Écosse) en septembre, de l’autre côté de la rivière Missaguash, en face des positions françaises de Beauséjour. En 1749, l’abbé Le Loutre, missionnaire français auprès des Indiens, était revenu dans la province ; Cornwallis jeta le blâme sur lui, « un misérable bon à rien s’il en fut jamais », pour ses ennuis avec les Indiens. Au commencement, le gouverneur avait noué des liens amicaux avec les Micmacs aux alentours de Halifax mais il entendit bientôt dire que les Indiens, dans toute la province, s’étaient « ligués » avec Le Loutre. En août 1749, ils commencèrent leurs déprédations, capturant un navire à Canseau (Canso), en attaquant un autre à Chignectou et faisant tomber quatre hommes dans une embuscade près de Halifax. Cornwallis proposa alors d’« extirper complètement » les Micmacs, mais le Board of Trade le prévint que ce parti pourrait mettre en danger les colonies britanniques avoisinantes en créant « un redoutable ressentiment » parmi les autres tribus. Les attaques indiennes continuèrent alors que la guerre de Sept Ans était déjà bien engagée.

      Peu après l’arrivée de Cornwallis, plusieurs Acadiens s’étaient présentés devant lui, le priant de leur faire connaître leur situation sous son gouvernement. Sur ses directives, ils revinrent plus tard avec tous leurs délégués, qui réclamèrent l’autorisation de prêter le serment d’allégeance avec réserve, tel que le faisait prêter l’ancien gouverneur Richard Philipps*. Cornwallis, qui avait une piètre opinion de ce dernier, tenait à montrer aux Acadiens qu’ « il [était] en [son] pouvoir de les dominer ou de les protéger » ; il exigea un serment d’allégeance sans équivoque qui les obligerait à porter lés armes pour la couronne britannique. En septembre, 1 000 Acadiens répondirent qu’ils quitteraient la province plutôt que de prêter le serment sans réserve. Constatant qu’il ne pouvait pas forcer les Acadiens à accepter cette exigence, Cornwallis décida de les laisser en paix jusqu’à ce qu’il ait reçu des instructions du Board of Trade. Pendant ce temps, il essaya de couper leurs communications avec les Français de la Saint-Jean et de l’isthme, et il améliora ses moyens de les surveiller en établissant de petits postes dans la région des Mines (près de Wolfville) et en y construisant un chemin. Conformément aux instructions du Board of Trade, il ne fit rien jusqu’à la fin de son mandat qui pût provoquer le départ des Acadiens.

      Les désordres survenus à l’extérieur de Halifax avaient convaincu Cornwallis qu’il faudrait accroître la force militaire ; en octobre 1749, il demanda deux régiments supplémentaires au Board of Trade, tout en l’assurant qu’avec ces renforts il rendrait la Nouvelle-Écosse « plus florissante que n’importe quelle partie de l’Amérique du Nord ». Lorsqu’on le sermonna sévèrement, en février 1750, sur la nécessité de réduire les dépenses publiques au strict minimum, il ne le prit pas en bonne part : « Messeigneurs, sans argent, vous n’auriez pu avoir ni ville ni établissement, même pas de colons. » Ainsi commença une longue bataille à propos des dépenses, où Cornwallis se montra, selon ce qu’écrivit MacMechan, « direct, voire même brusque ». Quoique le Board of Trade compatît aux difficultés de Cornwallis et que ce dernier obtînt le régiment supplémentaire destiné à l’expédition de Lawrence à l’automne de 1750, il fut forcé de suivre, dans l’ensemble, les ordres d’un gouvernement qui s’alarmait de plus en plus du coût de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Ainsi, en juin 1750, le Board of Trade enregistra de nombreuses plaintes contre Hugh Davidson, le secrétaire de Cornwallis, surtout pour avoir « négligé » de transmettre les états des fortes sommes dépensées à Halifax, et demanda, entre autres, pourquoi on avait envoyé suffisamment « de livres de pain » pour ravitailler 3 000 personnes pendant un an alors que seulement 1 500 à 2 450 personnes avaient été réellement nourries. Troublé de ce que « quiconque sous [ses] ordres ait pu être même soupçonné de malversation », Cornwallis envoya Davidson dans la métropole pour répondre aux accusations. Il précisa cependant que le Board of Trade n’avait pas grande raison de s’étonner du supplément des dépenses puisque £44 000 avaient été dépensées uniquement en Grande-Bretagne cette année-là, dépassant ainsi de £4 000 la subvention tout entière accordée par le parlement. En novembre, Cornwallis changea quelque peu de tactique ; il espérait qu’en exposant les difficultés énormes soulevées par l’établissement de la ville, il se verrait approuver par le Board of Trade et justifierait l’excès de ses dépenses. D’autant plus effrayé par les dépenses que représentait le maintien d’une garnison à Chignectou, il espérait qu’on les accepterait, étant donné « le grand pas que cela représent[ait] pour faire de cette presqu’île ce qu’elle était destinée à être, à savoir une colonie florissante ».

      La querelle atteignit son paroxysme en 1751. En mars de cette année-là, le Board of Trade avisa Cornwallis qu’il ne conserverait pas l’estime du parlement s’il ne s’abstenait pas de faire des « excédents » à l’avenir. La réponse de Cornwallis fut encore plus brusque qu’à l’accoutumée : « Vous flatter, Messeigneurs, avec des espoirs d’économies » serait « dissimulation de la pire espèce ». Cette réponse croisa une autre lettre, datée de juin, du Board of Trade qui, en fait, l’accusait d’avoir négligé de le tenir au courant des événements depuis le mois de novembre précédent ; quand Cornwallis répondit en septembre, il annonça qu’il était à bout de patience. Avec une délectation manifeste, il énumérait les difficultés particulières qu’il avait déjà présentées au Board of Trade, impliquant par là qu’il aurait pu s’épargner cette peine, étant donné le peu d’aide qu’il avait reçu ; il terminait en souhaitant que l’on désignât son successeur. Il n’avait été nommé que pour deux ou trois ans et sa santé avait été médiocre, mais il se peut fort bien que son retour en Grande-Bretagne ait été précipité par le fait qu’il était dans l’impossibilité de développer la colonie comme il l’entendait. Il quitta Halifax en octobre 1752, et Hopson lui succéda.

      Cornwallis poursuivit alors sa carrière politique et militaire. En 1752, il échangea son grade de colonel du 40e d’infanterie, reçu en mars 1750, pour celui du 24e d’infanterie. L’année suivante, il fut élu député de Westminster, siège qu’il détint jusqu’en 1762. Quand la guerre de Sept Ans éclata, Cornwallis embarqua une partie de son régiment sur la flotte de l’amiral John Byng* en partance pour secourir Minorque. La flotte revint sans avoir accompli sa tâche. Cornwallis et deux autres colonels passèrent devant un conseil de guerre pour avoir participé à la décision de laisser Minorque à son sort. Un tribunal bienveillant les disculpa pour des raisons techniques mais les trois hommes furent l’objet de rudes satires de la part de la presse. Toutefois, les puissants amis de Cornwallis eurent suffisamment d’influence non seulement pour lui permettre de rester dans l’armée mais aussi pour qu’il obtienne la promotion de major général en 1757. En octobre de cette année-là, Cornwallis prit part à un deuxième incident du genre de celui de Minorque : il se joignit en effet, en tant que commandant de brigade, à l’expédition du général sir John Mordaunt contre l’arsenal de la marine française de Rochefort. Après une semaine de réunions peu concluantes, auxquelles Cornwallis participa, on décida de retourner en Angleterre. Cette fois, Cornwallis ne fut pas jugé mais la presse l’attaqua de nouveau. À la suite d’une tournée de service en Irlande, il fut promu lieutenant général en 1760 et devint gouverneur de Gibraltar en 1762. Le poste ne lui convenait pas mais, quoiqu’il eût à maintes reprises demandé sa mutation, sa conduite à Minorque et à Rochefort témoigna peut-être contre lui, et il demeura à Gibraltar jusqu’à sa mort.

      Les lettres d’Edward Cornwallis révèlent les traits d’un homme austère, ayant un sentiment aigu du devoir, qui se persuada de l’importance de sa mission, celle d’encourager une présence britannique en Nouvelle-Écosse, et qui sermonnait volontiers les autorités parce qu’elles refusaient de fournir les moyens, selon lui nécessaires, de mener sa tâche à bien. Trop franc parfois, il profita probablement de ses amis à la cour pour présenter des critiques dont ni le genre ni la manière de les faire ne pouvait provenir d’un gouverneur ordinaire. Néanmoins, personne ne peut mettre en doute son intention de faire ce qu’il pensait être le mieux pour la Nouvelle-Écosse ; presque personne n’a critiqué ses décisions fondamentales concernant Halifax. Parce que la malchance ou une faiblesse personnelle poursuivit ses entreprises européennes, il se peut fort bien que les trois ans de Cornwallis en Nouvelle-Ecosse fussent les plus réussis de sa carrière.

J. Murray Beck

Un portrait représentant supposément Cornwallis se trouvait dans la Government House à Halifax en 1923. En 1929, le gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Écosse fit l’acquisition d’un portrait authentique qui se trouve aux PANS. Une grande statue de Cornwallis fut dévoilée sur la place de l’hôtel Nova Scotian en 1931.



Passenger Lists for Ships Carrying the
"Foreign Protestants" to Nova Scotia

http://www-umb.u-strasbg.fr/tele/pdf/Chantiers5.pdf



73 Families 18 May 1751 "SPEEDWELL"
Joseph Wilson, Master


Name

Age

From

Trade

Alternate Spelling

Aissens, Julius

39

Vriesland

Farmer




Anshutz, Paul Heinrich

40




Cook




Becker, Henry

40

Swiss

Farmer

BAKER

Bertling, Frederick

44

Berlin

Shoemaker




Beyer, Henderick

39

Saxony

Farmer




Bowen, Andrew

30

Strassbourg

Farmer




Bruins, Gertje

30

Vriesland

Farmer




Bruise, Christian

24

Groenigen

Farmer




Brumbter, Hans

38

Alsace

Farmer




Buglemeyer, N.

26




Miner




Carver, Mathew

19

Wurttemberg

Mason




Clair, Stiefen

41

Swiss

Farmer




Classen, Henderick

42

Groenigen

Joiner

GLAWSON

Crever, John

27

Saxony

Farmer




d'Orseille, Pierre

25

Swiss

Farmer




Dahn, John

24

Swiss

Sadler




DeMayer, Bernard

26

Vriesland

Farmer




Denneman, Jan

43




Shoemaker




Drilliot, Casper

25

E. Vriesland

Joiner

DRILLIO

Friedenberg, Conrad

29




Smith




Fuhtz, Johann Andrew

32

Saxony

Farmer

FULTZ

Gertzens, Gelle

45

E. Vriesland

Farmer

GETSON/GETZEN

Guio, Francois

13

Normandy

Farmer




Haake, Michael

26

Wurttemberg

Cooper




Halpin, John

19

Ireland

Brasier




Hammer, John Christian

37

Saxony

Shoemaker




Hatt, Conrad

38

Swiss

Smith




Hatt, Jacob

37

Swiss

Smith




Humb, Christopher

32




Miner




Isler, Adam

40

Alsace

Farmer




Isler, Martin

41

Alsace

Farmer




Itsinga, Thomas

30

Vriesland

Watchmaker




Janse, Hendrick

33

E. Vriesland

Farmer




Jansen, Hekke

35

E. Vriesland

Tailor




Jansen, Abraham

25

Groenigen

Farmer




Jansen, Bern't

34

Hamburg

Tailor




Jesson, Christian

24

Hamburg

Wine Cooper




Jesson, Gothart

22

Hamburg

Wine Cooper




Keller, J. Laurence

48

Vriesland

Schoolmaster




Krever, Andr. Christopher

16

Saxony

Farmer




LeRoy, Louis

33

Wurttemberg

Surgeon




Ley, Joseph

48

Swiss

Farmer

LLOY

Ley, Michael aka Smith

38

Swiss

Smith




Leysterbach, Henderick

39

Groenigen

Glazier




Libsdorff, Casper

26

Hamburg

Shoemaker




Lutjes, Geritt

39

Vriesland

Farmer




Metler, Alexander

30

Swiss

Farmer




Metzelar, Ulrich

40

Hamburg

Butcher

METZLER

Mey, George

30

Berlin

Shoemaker




Mosser, Petter

38

Swiss

Farmer

MOSER

Muson, Jacob

40

Swiss

Smith

MOSER

Neuhas, Christian

25

Hesse







Raadbacher, Frantz

16

Strassbourg

Huntsman




Ranneveld, Gottlieb

40

Desau

Tailor




Romkies, Bruin

27

Groenigen

Wool Comber




Rosty, Christian

19

Swiss




ROAST

Rosty, William

38

Swiss




ROAST

Scherenberg, Jacob




Hamburg

Butcher




Schmid, Christoph

16




Miner




Schomacher, T.

22

Hamburg

Theology




Schoonveld, Janse

22

Groenigen

Farmer




Schoter, Hans Jurg

17

Wurttemberg

Shoemaker




Schryver, John Paul

17

Saxony

Farmer




Seidler, Gottleib

36

Hamburg

Shoemaker

SADLER

Slyter, Philip

44

Holstein

Tailor




Staal, George

46




Miner




Stahl, Hendrick

32

Saxony

Miller




Suderusch, George

60

Groenigen

Shoemaker




Symons, Johannes

40

Hesse

Farmer




Timmensason, Hendrick

54

E. Vriesland

Farmer




Van Olthoff, Frederick

16

Sweden

Cadet




Weiderhold, Adolph

35

Warbourg

Late Sergeant




Welsch, George

28

Wurttemberg

Brewer




Zeemans, Daniel

50

Groenigen

Shoemaker



I had this sent to me some time ago by Cameron and I think its worth passing his mail onto to all you French Amey hunters.


He writes:-

Some “ameys” by various different spellings lived in the Principality of Montbeliard—which existed from approx 900 AD till about 1795.

The principality bordered the Rhine river between what is now – France and Switzerland. In about 1794/5 France invaded Montbeliard for the last time and Annexed it to France. The Principality was not French or any other nationality per se – it was just Montbeliard. It has been speculated that it was the first protestant land in the world. The area has often throughout history been called Alsace, or Alsace-Lorraine. Note that there is also a city of Mont-beliard.

A large number of ‘foreign protestants’ left in 1749/51/52 and settled in Nova Scotia. The British military recorded the names and corrupted the actual spellings generally. It would NOT be correct to generalize and conclude that the settlers were necessarily French. They were considered Huguenots = protestants—there would have been significant animosity between many of them for [catholic] France. Many would never use a French spelling – preferring a German one instead, though most were not in fact German.

In history, Montbeliard was a safe haven for non-catholics fleeing – for example Spain’s expulsions of the Jews starting in the 1200s+, as well as Portugal, and of course, France.

I am a descendant of the Langill line as well as related families from (and in) Montbeliard. Tlhe ‘Amey’ line could be speculated to be of Spanish origin. My line is related to several Spanish lines including Darez/s, Amey/z/s, Sandoz. If you search under Langille, you may find some of these names. There are several databases of Langilles, listing an Amey variant at:freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~langille/. My Langill line never spelled it the French way with an ‘e’ at the end, but family researchers often settle on the ‘Langille’ version to rationalize it.

Cameron

  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azrefs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə