Loudoun soil and water conservation district 2010 tree seedling sale




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LOUDOUN SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT

2010 TREE SEEDLING SALE

The Loudoun Soil and Water Conservation District will offer a limited number of tree seedlings for the 2010 planting season. The young, bare-rooted tree seedlings are well suited to Virginia soils and climate. Tree seedlings are 1-3 years old. Proceeds from the sale are used to fund the District’s conservation education.


Pre-paid orders will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tree seedlings will be available for pick-up at the LSWCD office in Leesburg (adjacent to the Wachovia Bank, Catoctin Circle) on Friday, March 26, 2010 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. We recommend that you plant the seedlings as soon as possible to minimize transplant stress. Please call the LSWCD office at (703) 777-2075 for more information.



TREE SPECIES




50 Trees / Bundle


5 Trees / Bundle


Number

of Bundles


Cost

WHITE PINE, Pinus strobus, 2 year old seedlings, 6 – 12 inches

$25.00/bundle

XXX







NORWAY SPRUCE, Picea abies, 3 year old seedlings, 12 – 24 inches

$35.00/bundle

XXX







WHITE DOGWOOD (tree), Cornus florida, 18 – 24 inches


XXX

$6.00/bundle







REDBUD, Cercis canadensis, 18 – 24 inches


XXX

$6.00/bundle







RIVER BIRCH, Betula nigra, 18 – 24 inches


XXX

$6.00/bundle







SYCAMORE, Platanus occidentalis, 18 – 24 inches

XXX

$6.00/bundle







SHUMARD OAK, Quercus shumardii, 18 – 24 inches

XXX

$6.00/bundle







PAW PAW, Asimina triloba, 18 – 24 inches

XXX

$6.00/bundle






SHRUB SPECIES














INDIGOBUSH, Amorpha fruiticosa, 18 – 24 inches

XXX

$6.00/bundle







SILKY DOGWOOD, Cornus amomum, 12 – 24 inches

XXX

$6.00/bundle







SUBTOTAL













+ 5% VA SALES TAX (x.05)













TOTAL ORDER














PLEASE ORDER YOUR TREES EARLY, QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED

FULL PAYMENT INCLUDING SALES TAX MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR ORDER

SEND CASH/CHECK PAYMENT TO:

LOUDOUN SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT

30 CATOCTIN CIRCLE, SE, SUITE H, LEESBURG, VA 20175

(No Credit Cards Accepted)

DEADLINE FOR ORDERS IS MARCH 12th.

NAME_______________________________________________________________________________


ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
TELEPHONE: HOME _________________________ WORK _______________________________
E-MAIL:______________________________________________________________________________
THANK YOU FOR YOUR ORDER!!
The Loudoun Soil and Water Conservation District assumes no responsibility or liability for planting of any of the tree seedlings and in the sale thereof makes no warranties, expressed or implied of merchantability or of fitness for a particular purpose and makes no warranties regarding the survival rate or rate of growth of any seedlings.

TREE SPECIES DESCRIPTION



TREES
WHITE PINE (Pinus strobus) is a fast growing pine, reaches 80 to 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 to 3 feet. Rapid growth rate (12 to 24 inches/year). Needles are soft, blue-green, flexible, 3-5” long in clusters of five. Cones are slender, tapering, thornless, 3-10” long and provide a good food source for wildlife. Thrives in most soils with normal moisture conditions, but can tolerate wet poorly drained areas. Used for windbreaks, screens, and Christmas trees if pruned to form dense branches.
NORWAY SPRUCE (Picea abies) is one of the fastest growing of all spruce. A good choice for screens and windbreaks, as its branches are dense and low to the ground. Has annual whorls and develops strong branches covered with dark green flat needles, withstands snow and ice storms better than most evergreen species. Grows 60-90 feet tall with a trunk diameter of 1-3 feet. Branches droop gracefully as tree matures, making this an attractive ornamental. Cones 4-6” long. Grows well in most soils types. Full or ½ day sun.
WHITE DOGWOOD (Cornus florida) is a small flat-topped tree reaching 10’ to 30’ tall. Grows well in light shade under tall trees, but recommend open sunlight (susceptible to Anthracnose in shade). Most famous for its spring display of showy white bracted “blossoms” that come out before the leaves. Leaves turn purple and red in the fall. Is an excellent choice as an ornamental yard tree. Clusters of red fruit provide a good food source for wildlife.
REDBUD (Cercis canadensis) is a native tree that is a legume. A small tree with the trunk divided close to the ground forming a spreading crown. Reaches heights of 20 to 30 feet and a crown spread of 25 to 35 feet. Flowers very early in the spring with reddish purple buds opening to a rosy pink. Leaves are heart shaped and turn yellow in the fall. Does well on many soil types except cannot tolerate wet sites. Has landscape value as a single specimen, in groupings or in the shrub border, especially nice in woodland and naturalized settings.
RIVER BIRCH (Betula nigra) is a beautiful tree known for its reddish-white peeling bark. It grows fast and reaches heights of 40’ – 60’. It grows in partial to full sun and in wet to well drained soils (tolerates flooding). Seed is important for wildlife like chickadees, cardinals, woodpeckers, and chipmunks.
SYCAMORE (Platanus occidentalis) is a large, deciduous species of wide distribution across the eastern and central U.S. It commonly occurs along the banks of waterways and adjacent bottomlands, although it has proven adaptable and has even been planted widely on mine spoils. Sycamore's eye-catching white and gray exfoliating bark has led to considerable ornamental use.
SHUMARD OAK (Quercus shumardii) is a large southern oak, often over 100 feet tall and several feet in diameter, with a clear bole and a broad, spreading crown. It has a grayish brown, developing dark, deep furrows, with light gray to white scaly ridge tops.  
PAW PAW (Asimina triloba) is a small tree up to 40 feet tall, 12 inches in diameter, often found in growing in small clusters. Its bark is smooth, brown, splotched with wart-like lenticels, often with light gray patches. The fruit is very unique in that they resemble a short, fat banana, 2 1/2 to 4 inches long, at first green then tuning yellowish then brown as they ripen in the fall; very fleshy and tastes much like a banana.
SHRUBS
INDIGOBUSH (Amorpha fruiticosa) is a multi-stem suckering shrub to 10 feet tall and nearly as wide, often described as "leggy". The fruit is best described as tiny cucumbers, bright green and drying to brown, from 1/4 to 1/2 inch long. The flower is borne on tall (to 6 inch), slender spikes at the ends of the twigs, deep purple-blue with long bright orange or yellow anthers, appearing mid-summer, opening from base to tip. 
SILKY DOGWOOD (Cornus amomum) is a small to medium sized, multi-stemmed, suckering shrub up to 10 feet tall. Branches may bend down and root in wet soil. Berry-like drupes developing in flat-topped clusters, 1/4 inch in diameter, bluish with white blotches, maturing in late summer. Flower is small, white, in flat-topped clusters, 2 inches in diameter that appear in late spring and early summer.


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