Key Findings from Poll Data: Support for Raising Graduation Requirements High school students say that school is too easy




Yüklə 20.04 Kb.
tarix10.04.2016
ölçüsü20.04 Kb.




Key Findings from Poll Data:

Support for Raising Graduation Requirements

High school students say that school is too easy.

  • 38 percent of the teens polled by the National Governors Association (NGA) say that high school is easy; in contrast, only 6 percent say high school is very hard. (NGA)

  • One in five (20 percent) high school students do not feel motivated or inspired to work hard. Nearly 70 percent say that high school expectations are moderate to low. (Horatio Alger)

High school students say they want to work harder and be challenged.

  • 64 percent of high school students say that high school would improve a great deal if there were more opportunities to take more challenging courses. (Horatio Alger)

  • The vast majority of students favor proposals that would raise graduation standards. Nine out of 10 (91 percent) students believe that providing opportunities to take more challenging courses would be an improvement. (Horatio Alger)

New college students say they were not prepared by high school to do college-level work.

  • College students often feel unprepared for college-level work:

    • Well over half (56 percent) of all college students say that high school left them unprepared for the work and study habits expected in college. (Achieve)

  • Students who faced higher expectations and took more challenging courses in high school are much more likely to feel prepared:

    • College students who took Algebra II or higher-level math courses in high school are more than twice as likely to feel prepared for the math they are expected to do in college (60 percent feel well prepared). (Achieve)

    • Students who faced high expectations are much less likely to take remedial classes in college (only 27 percent have taken a remedial class) than those who faced low expectations (50 percent have taken a remedial class). (Achieve)

Recent graduates support policies to increase rigor and preparation in high school.

  • If high schools raised standards, graduates say they would be able to meet them.

    • Four out of five college students (82 percent) and non-students (80 percent) say that they would have worked harder if their schools had demanded more, set higher academic standards, and raised expectations of how much coursework and studying would be necessary to earn a diploma. (Achieve)

  • Strong majorities of high school graduates support several remedies that would increase their workload, including 81 percent who say that requiring students to pass exams to graduate from high school would improve things and 74 percent who say that requiring all students to take four years of math and courses in science to graduate would improve things. (Achieve)

College professors are disappointed by high school graduates’ preparation.

  • College professors do not think students are ready to tackle college-level work:

    • Only 7 percent of college instructors at two-year institutions say that most of their students come to college extremely or very well prepared. (Achieve)

    • Instructors at two-year colleges estimate that nearly half (49 percent) of students are inadequately prepared, while instructors at four-year colleges say that 39 percent of students are not adequately prepared. (Achieve)

  • Students do not have the skills necessary to do college-level work, particularly in math and writing:

    • Instructors are dissatisfied with students’ writing quality (62 percent), reading comprehension (70 percent), ability to think analytically (66 percent), work and study habits (65 percent), and ability to do research (59 percent). (Achieve)

    • Only 4 percent of professors say students are very well prepared in math. (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

Recent graduates who went directly into the workforce also say they are not prepared for what employers expect of them.

  • High school graduates are not ready to meet the demands of their employers:

    • Only 14 percent of high school graduates in the workforce are confident that they are generally able to do what is expected. (Achieve)

    • 54 percent of those who didn’t go to college said that high school teachers made it easy to do just enough to get by. (Public Agenda)

  • Students do not have the skills necessary to succeed on the job:

    • Nearly half say that there are gaps in their oral communication skills, 45 percent struggle with research and nearly 40 percent feel they are not producing the kind of writing expected of them. (Achieve)

    • Nearly half (49 percent) of all non-college bound students say that high school left them unprepared for the work habits expected in the workforce. (Achieve)

  • Students who faced high expectations and took challenging courses in high school are better prepared than others:

    • 72 percent of non-college bound students who faced high expectations in high school feel that they are well prepared for the expectations of the workforce, whereas only 36 percent of those who faced low expectations say the same. (Achieve)

    • 68 percent of employees who took Algebra II or higher are even more likely to say they are prepared for the math they will face at work, as 68 percent who took the course feel prepared for the math they are expected to do at work. (Achieve)

Employers are disappointed in the skills and knowledge of the workers that high schools produce.

  • High school graduates often are not ready for entry-level positions:

    • Employers estimate that 39 percent of recent high school graduates with no additional education are unprepared for the expectations that they face in entry-level jobs. This is identical to the proportion of non-college students who say that they have gaps in their preparation. (Achieve)

  • Recent graduates are not prepared to advance in the workplace:

    • Employers also estimate that 45 percent of graduates are not adequately prepared for the skills and abilities they need to advance beyond entry level. (Achieve)

    • Only 18 percent of employers say that most recent high school graduates with no additional education are prepared for advancement in their company. This is only 8 percent more than those who say the same thing about applicants who do not have a high school diploma. (Achieve)

The Surveys


Achieve, Inc.

Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? February 2005

In this survey, high school graduates (college bound and not), college professors and employers report that high school graduates are not prepared for college or work, did not feel challenged in high school, and would have worked harder if more was expected of them. Achieve worked with Peter D. Hart Research Associates to poll 1,487 students, 300 college professors and 400 employers. A PowerPoint summary also is available.



The Chronicle of Higher Education

Special Report: School and College, March 2006

In March 2006, The Chronicle of Higher Education released a special report on high school and college. There are two companion surveys that find that professors believe college freshmen are not as prepared as their high school teachers say they are, particularly in writing and math. Conducted by Maguire Associates, a Boston-area research and consulting company, the survey comprised 9,000 teachers and 7,000 faculty members who were randomly selected, including 746 high school teachers and 1,098 college faculty. Interested readers need a subscription to The Chronicle of Higher Education to view.



Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc. (Horatio Alger)

State of Our Nation’s Youth 2005, August 2005

This annual survey of 13–19 year-olds was conducted by Peter D. Hart Research Associates. The 1,005 young people surveyed say they want to go to college, have more rigorous academics in high school and be given the opportunity to meet these challenges.



National Governors Association (NGA)

Redesigning the American High School: Rate Your Future, winter/spring 2005

NGA launched this survey of more than 10,000 teens ages 16 to 18 in winter and spring 2005. The responses are divided into high school students who intend to graduate and those who are not currently in high school or plan to leave early. The survey results provide insight into the experiences of high school students.



Public Agenda

Life After High School: Young People Talk about Their Hopes and Prospects, February 2005

Released in February 2005, this survey of 1,000 young adults ages 18 to 25 found that, no matter what race or income level, young adults aspire to go to college. It raises questions about the pressures that effect the decisions young people ultimately make regarding higher education and work and their futures. There was a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.






A Strategy Session for Achieve American Diploma Project (ADP) Network States

Moving From Some to All: Upgrading Graduation Requirements for All Students
The Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, Texas

February 8-9, 2007



Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azrefs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə