Idhs ics 100-400 Approved Instructor Request




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IDHS ICS 100-400 Approved Instructor Request

Overview

The Indiana Department of Homeland Security maintains an approved Incident Command System (ICS) instructor list on our website for those instructors who have met the Indiana requirements for ICS instructors. In addition to meeting the national ICS instructor requirements, Indiana requires all approved instructors to complete an ICS 100-400 train-the-trainer course (E/L449). Below are the requirements for IDHS-approved instructors.

Instructors listed on the “IDHS-approved instructor list” are qualified to teach ICS 100, 200, 300, 400, and 402 (ICS Overview for Executives/Senior Officials). All ICS instructors on this list are required to meet the following standards: Complete the following courses- ICS 100, ICS 200, ICS 300, ICS 400, FEMA IS 700a, and FEMA IS 800b; have extensive ICS experience as a Command or General Staff member on a Type 3 or greater incident within 5 years of taking the ICS TTT; and have extensive adult education experience. Additionally, instructors on this list have completed the ICS 100-400 train-the-trainer course (which is not required by federal standards, but IS required by Indiana standards to be on the IDHS-Approved Instructor list). Those who wish to teach ICS courses, but do not wish to take the 100-400 TTT course may do so, provided they meet national standards, but will not receive support from IDHS. For more information on federal instructor qualifications, visit http://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nims/nims_training_program.pdf. Meeting these qualifications does not automatically qualify an instructor to conduct an ICS 100-400 train-the-trainer course. Inclusion on the “Approved Instructor List” does not intend to imply IDHS is sponsoring or promoting listed instructors.

At the instructor's request, course registration, tests, and certificates will be provided by IDHS. ICS instruction is not intended to be a for-profit endeavor. A small fee (not more than $25/hr) may be charged to the requesting host agency (not to students directly) to cover the instructor’s time out of office plus applicable travel/per diem IF the instructor’s employer will not pay for the instructor’s time. A separate at-cost fee may also be used to cover printing of student materials if requested by the hosting agency.

To ensure nationwide consistency, all classroom times are USDHS-standard minimum contact time (excluding breaks). Additional time may be needed to complete these courses.

ICS 100: Introduction to the Incident Command System (8 hrs)

ICS 200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents (12.5 hrs)

ICS 300: Advanced ICS for Expanding Incidents (18 hrs)

ICS 400: ICS for Command and General Staff (14 hrs)

ICS 402: ICS for Executives/Senior Officials (2 hrs)

IS-700.a: NIMS: An Introduction (8 hrs)

IS 800.b: National Response Framework (8 hrs)


Indiana Instructor Qualifications:
To be included on the IDHS-approved instructor list, instructors must meet ALL of the following prerequisites and provide written proof. Meeting the Indiana approved-instructor requirements will enable an instructor to meet the national requirements, as Indiana’s requirements include the completion of the ICS 100-400 train-the-trainer course.
1) Incident Command Training
Candidates must have successfully completed ALL of the following courses:

  • ICS 100

  • ICS 200

  • ICS 300

  • ICS 400

  • IS-700a

  • IS-800b

  • E/L 449: ICS 100-400 TTT*

NOTE: Candidates must have taken the Emergency Management Institute, US Department of Agriculture, National Fire Academy or National Wildfire Coordinating Group ICS courses. Other ICS courses must meet ICS objectives prescribed by the NIMS Integration Center.


*To attend the E/L 449 course, applicant must meet all other requirements in sections 1-3 and provide proof of completion to IDHS prior to registering for the 100-400 TTT.
Proof: Copy of all certificates (official FEMA or state transcript is acceptable)
2) Incident Command Experience
Within the last 5 years, candidates must have served as Command or General Staff on three Type III or greater incidents. Events may be real-world disasters or planned events such as a large gathering (national political conventions, Thunder Over Louisville, Super Bowl, etc.)
Incident Complexity

Type 1

  • This type of incident is the most complex, requiring national resources for safe and effective management and operation.

  • All command and general staff positions are filled.

  • Operations personnel often exceed 500 per operational period and total personnel will usually exceed 1,000.

  • Branches need to be established.

  • A written incident action plan (IAP) is required for each operational period.

  • The agency administrator will have briefings, and ensure that the complexity analysis and delegation of authority are updated.

  • Use of resource advisors at the incident base is recommended.

  • There is a high impact on the local jurisdiction, requiring additional staff for office administrative and support functions.

Type 2

  • This type of incident extends beyond the capabilities for local control and is expected to go into multiple operational periods. A Type 2 incident may require the response of resources out of area, including regional and/or national resources, to effectively manage the operations, command, and general staffing.

  • Most or all of the command and general staff positions are filled.

  • A written IAP is required for each operational period.

  • Many of the functional units are needed and staffed.

  • Operations personnel normally do not exceed 200 per operational period and total incident personnel do not exceed 500 (guidelines only).

  • The agency administrator is responsible for the incident complexity analysis, agency administration briefings, and the written delegation of authority.

Type 3

  • When incident needs exceed capabilities, the appropriate ICS positions should be added to match the complexity of the incident.

  • Some or all of the command and general staff positions may be activated, as well as division/group supervisor and/or unit leader level positions.

  • A Type 3 IMT or incident command organization manages initial action incidents with a significant number of resources, an extended attack incident until containment/control is achieved, or an expanding incident until transition to a Type 1 or 2 IMT.

  • The incident may extend into multiple operational periods.

  • A written IAP may be required for each operational period.

Type 4

  • Command staff and general staff functions are activated only if needed.

  • Several resources are required to mitigate the incident, including a task force or strike team.

  • The incident is usually limited to one operational period in the control phase.

  • The agency administrator may have briefings, and ensure the complexity analysis and delegation of authority is updated.

  • No written IAP is required, but a documented operational briefing will be completed for all incoming resources.

  • The role of the agency administrator includes operational plans including objectives and priorities.

Type 5

  • The incident can be handled with one or two single resources with up to six personnel.

  • Command and general staff positions (other than the incident commander) are not activated.

  • No written IAP is required.

  • The incident is contained within the first operational period and often within an hour to a few hours after resources arrive on scene.

  • Examples include a vehicle fire, an injured person, or a police traffic stop.

Candidates must provide written documentation of their experience including type of incident (fire, flood, tornado, etc.), approximate date, and position(s) held during operational period(s). ICS instructors should have extensive (3 or more events in last 5 years) experience in incident management, serving in command or general staff positions.


Proof: Summation/letter stating experience as it relates to the above requirements plus at least one of the following for each event:

  • Written copy of the Incident Action Plan OR documented operational period briefing for each operational period you served on

  • Command/General Staff chart for each operational period you served

  • A copy of the final, approved after action report with your name and position during the event

Exceptions to this documentation may be considered on a case-by-case basis. No exceptions will be granted to the requirements.
Acceptable Event Summaries

  1. August 15-19, 2013 EF-3 tornado (Type III event):

I served as the Planning Chief from 10am-7pm on August 15th and 16th, and as Operations Chief from 7am-4pm on August 17th -19th. Agencies involved included Center Township Fire Department, Smallville Police Department, American Red Cross, Meals on Wheels, Hoosier County EMA, and Hoosier County Hospital. A final copy of all Incident Action Plan is attached.


  1. May 5-8, 2012 county-wide flood (Type III event):

I served as the Planning Chief from 8am-8pm on May 5th, and as Operations Chief from 7am-4pm on May 7th. Agencies involved included Center Township Fire Department, Smallville Police Department, American Red Cross, Hoosier County EMA, and Ridgemont High School. This event did not have written Incident Action Plans. My position in the organizational structure is highlighted in the attached org. charts for each operational period. Additionally, I have attached the after action report which details the incident, operational periods, organizational structure, and noted corrective actions.


  1. July 22-August 16, 2014, Type I wildfires in King Fire, El Dorado and Placer Counties, California (Incident #4108):

On August 10-12, I served as Deputy Logistics Chief through the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). The King Fire was managed in Unified Command with Eldorado National Forest, El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office and CAL FIRE. The Federal Team CIIMT 5 (Jim Giachino) coordinated firefighting operations of Zone 1 (northern portion) of the fire, and CAL FIRE IMT 5 (Kevin Smith) managed Zone 2 (southern portion) of the fire. Agencies involved included American Red Cross, Cal Fire, California Highway Patrol, California Office of Emergency Services, El Dorado County Animal Services, El Dorado Irrigation District, Pacific Gas and Electric, Placer County Sheriff, Placer County Water Agency, Sacramento Municipal Utility, Sierra Pacific Industries. Additionally, IDHS District 11 Incident Management Team members Toby Jennings, Ben Hurley, Cassidy Lake, and I participated over a 7 day period (Aug. 7-13). Total personnel assigned to the incident= 7,621. Incident Action Plan is attached. More information can be found at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4108/.


Unacceptable

  • Over the last 15 years I have served as an Incident Commander numerous times. My supervisor recommends me for the ICS TTT course.



3) Adult Education Experience
Candidate must have formal instructor training such as college courses, National Wildlife Coordinating Groups Facilitative Instructor M410 course, Emergency Management Institute’s Master Trainer Program, National Fire Academy’s Instructional Methodology class, or US DHS Training & Exercise Division (formerly Office of Grants & Training) Instructor Training Certification course, or equivalent. Candidate must provide written documentation or certification (Fire Instructor II/III, EMS PI, EMA Instructional/Presentation Skills course, FEMA Master Trainer, etc.).
Proof: List of adult education experience (names and dates of courses taught) and copy of current certification(s)


Additionally, all ICS instructors should meet the following USDHS requirements:


Instructor Levels:

  • Lead instructors must have sufficient experience in presenting all units of the course to be capable of last-minute substitution for unit instructors.

  • Unit instructors must be experienced in the lesson content they are presenting.

  • Adjunct instructors may provide limited instruction in specialized knowledge and skills at the discretion of the lead instructor. Adjunct instructors must be experienced, proficient, and knowledgeable of current issues in their field of expertise.

  • Training requirements for lead and unit instructors: Instructors should have formal instructor training (National Wildlife Coordinating Group Facilitative Instructor, M-410, EMI Master Trainer Program, Center for Domestic Preparedness Instructor Training Course, IDHS Instructional Presentation Skills course, or equivalent).

USDHS Course Descriptions and Instructor Requirements


ICS-100: Introduction to the Incident Command System


Purpose

This course provides training and resources for personnel who require a basic understanding of the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS-100 introduces ICS and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the NIMS.


Audience

The target audience includes persons involved with emergency planning and response or recovery efforts. Recommended that ICS-100 participants use their skills in an operational environment before enrolling in ICS-200. This will provide necessary context and understanding of the skills they will develop when they take ICS-200.


EMI offers the following online discipline specific versions of ICS-100:

IS-100.HC—Introduction to the Incident Command System for Healthcare/Hospitals

IS-100.HE—Introduction to the Incident Command System for Higher Education

IS-100.LE—Introduction to the Incident Command System for Law Enforcement

IS-100.PW—Introduction to the Incident Command System for Public Works Personnel

IS-100.SC—Introduction to the Incident Command System for Schools


Prerequisites

N/A


Course Topics

  • ICS Overview

  • Basic Features of ICS

  • Incident Commander and Command Staff Functions

  • General Staff Functions

  • ICS Facilities

  • Common Responsibilities




Relation to NIMS Document

IV Command and Management

IV.A Incident Command System

IV.A.1 Management Characteristics

IV.A.2 Incident Command and Command Staff

IV.A.3 General Staff



Instruction Standards

  • Minimum course length for actual instructor-led classroom: approximately 8 classroom hours

  • Approximately 3 hours for interactive, web-based (independent study) course


Instructor(s) Qualifications

  • One instructor required, two recommended

  • Lead and unit instructors should have successfully completed ICS-100, ICS-200, and EMI’s IS-700 (NIMS, An Introduction)

  • Lead instructors should have training and experience in adult education and have served as incident commander or in a command staff or general staff position

  • Service in a mid-level emergency management and incident response position within five years in real-world incidents, planned events, or accredited exercises

  • Recognized qualifications in techniques of instruction and adult education methodologies






ICS-200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents


Purpose

This course is designed to enable personnel to operate efficiently during an incident or event within the ICS. This course focuses on the management of single resources.


Audience

ICS-200 provides training and resources for personnel who are likely to assume a supervisory position within the ICS. The primary target audience is response personnel at the supervisory level.


Prerequisites

ICS-100
Note: FEMA’s NIC recommends that IS-700 and ICS-200 participants have experience using concepts and principles from ICS-100 in a response or exercise.




Course Topics

  • Describe the ICS organization appropriate to the complexity of the incident or event

  • Use ICS to manage an incident

  • Leadership and Management

  • Delegation of Authority and Management by Objectives

  • Functional Areas and Positions

  • Briefings

  • Organizational Flexibility

  • Transfer of Command




Relation to NIMS Document

IV.A.1 Management Characteristics

IV.A.3 General Staff


Instruction Standards

  • Minimum course length for actual instructor-led classroom: 12.5 hours

  • Also available as an interactive, web-based course


Instructor Qualifications (in addition to the General ICS Instructor Guidelines)

  • FEMA’s NIC recommends at least two instructors for ICS 200

  • Successful completion of accredited ICS-100, ICS-200, IS-700, and IS-800

  • Lead instructor should have successfully completed ICS-300

  • Unit instructors should have successfully completed ICS-200

  • Service in an incident management position within five years in real-world incidents, planned events, or accredited exercises that required a written incident action plan (IAP) or encompassed more than one operational period

  • Recognized qualifications in techniques of instruction and adult education methodologies






ICS-300: Intermediate ICS for Expanding Incidents

Purpose

ICS-300 provides training and resources for personnel who require advanced application of the ICS. The course expands upon information covered in the ICS-100 and ICS-200 courses.


Audience

This course is intended for individuals who may assume a supervisory role in expanding incidents or Type 3 incidents.


Note: During a Type 3 incident, some or all of the command and general staff positions may be activated, as well as division or group supervisor and/or unit leader positions. These incidents may extend into multiple operational periods.
Prerequisites

ICS-100 and ICS-200, IS-/ICS-700, IS-/ICS-800


Note:

Students must have taken the Emergency Management Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Fire Academy, or National Wildfire Coordinating Group ICS courses. Other ICS courses will be reviewed for consistency with the ICS objectives prescribed by the National Integration Center (NIC).

FEMA recommends that ICS-300 participants have experience using concepts and principles from ICS 100 and 200 in a response or exercise and use their skills in an operational environment before taking ICS-400. This will provide necessary context and understanding of the skills they will develop when they take ICS-400.


Course Topics

  • Describe how the NIMS command and management component supports the management of expanding incidents.

  • Describe the incident or event management process for supervisors and expanding incidents as prescribed by ICS.

  • Implement the incident management process in a simulated Type 3 incident.

  • Develop an incident action plan for a simulated incident.




Relation to NIMS Document

III Resource Management

III.A.1 Concepts

III.A.2 Principles

III.B Managing Resources

IV Command and Management

IV.A Incident Command System

IV.A.1 Management Characteristics

IV.A.2 Incident Command and Command Staff

IV.A.3 General Staff



Instruction Standards

  • Minimum course length for actual instructor-led classroom: 18 hours


Instructor Qualifications (in addition to the General ICS Instructor Guidelines)

  • FEMA recommends at least two instructors for ICS-300

  • Successful completion of accredited ICS-100, ICS-200, IS-700, and IS-800

  • Lead instructor should have successfully completed ICS-400

  • Unit instructors should have successfully completed ICS-300

  • Service in an incident management position within five years in real-world incidents, planned events, or accredited exercises that required a written IAP or encompassed more than one operational period

  • Recognized qualifications in techniques of instruction and adult education methodologies.





ICS-400: Advanced ICS

Purpose

This course provides training and resources for personnel who require advanced application of the ICS. This course expands upon information covered in ICS-100 through ICS-300 courses. These earlier courses are prerequisites for ICS-400.


Audience

The target audience for this course is senior personnel who are expected to perform in a management capacity in an area command or multiagency coordination entity.


Prerequisites

ICS-100, ICS-200, ICS-300, IS-700 and IS-800


Note:

  • FEMA recommends experience using concepts and principles from ICS 100, 200, and 300 and use their skills in an operational environment before taking ICS-400. This will provide necessary context and understanding of the skills they will develop when they take ICS-400.

  • Students must have taken the Emergency Management Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Fire Academy, or National Wildfire Coordinating Group ICS courses. Other ICS courses will be reviewed for consistency with the ICS objectives prescribed by the NIC.




Course Topics

  • Explain how major incidents engender special management challenges.

  • Describe the circumstances in which an area command is established.

  • Describe the circumstances in which multiagency coordination systems are established.




Relation to NIMS Document

IV.A.2 Incident Command and Command Staff

IV.A.3 General Staff

IV.A.5 Incident Complex: Multiple Incident Management With a Single ICS Organization

IV.A.6 Area Command

IV.B Multiagency Coordination Systems

IV.B.1 Definition

IV.B.2 System Elements

IV.B.3 Examples of System Elements

IV.B.4 Primary Functions of MACS



Instruction Standards

  • Minimum course length for actual instructor-led classroom: 14 hours


Instructor Qualifications (in addition to the General ICS Instructor Guidelines)

  • FEMA recommends at least two instructors for ICS-400

  • Successful completion of accredited ICS-100, ICS-200, ICS-300, ICS-400, IS-700, and IS-800

  • Service in an emergency management and incident response position within five years in real-world incidents, planned events, or accredited exercises that required a written IAP or encompassed more than one operational period.

  • Recognized qualifications in techniques of instruction and adult education methodologies







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