Cuap proposal-New Qualification/Subject 2009




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(01) UC/09-BA/1


University of Canterbury

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha



CUAP Proposal-New Qualification/Subject 2009

Section A





Proposal Description




Purpose of the proposal

A succinct description of the purpose of the proposal. For example, to introduce a Postgraduate Certificate in Engineering or to add Classical Studies as a subject in the BA (Hons) schedule.



To establish a new subject in Cinema Studies in the PhD, MA, BA(Hons), BA, GradDipArts and CertArts.


Justification

A statement as to why the proposal is being put forward at this time in the context of UC strategic and planning goals.

How will the proposal advance the discipline?

How will the proposal reflect UC’s key strategic areas?

How will the proposal reflect the Faculty and Department/School academic plans?

How does this proposal fit the requirements of relevant professional, industry or community organisations?

How will the proposal complement or compete with existing courses or programmes at UC or other NZ universities?

Will the proposal generate new research?

Can the proposal incorporate Maori content or Treaty of Waitangi obligations?

Does the proposal fit the teaching and research specifications of available staff?



In 2008, the College of Arts decided to create a new programme in the area of Cinema Studies building on a pathway in the existing Theatre and Film Studies programme. The proposed Cinema Studies programme will be differentiated from the exiting programme in a number of ways. It will no longer contain a practical component in every class, new courses will be created and current course offerings will be completely revised to reorient the new programme to the new learning outcomes.
The strategic goals of the University of Canterbury will be met by developing a relevant and attractive programme in Cinema Studies that is founded upon best international academic practice. The proposed undergraduate and postgraduate qualification will greatly enhance the academic appeal of Cinema Studies for students, will create a viable new programme for the College, and will visibly raise the profile of Canterbury in this field both nationally and internationally.
New Zealand
Over the past decade in New Zealand, Cinema/Film Studies has been one of the most significant growth areas in the Humanities. After the model of successful programmes in North America, the UK, Europe and Australia, the majority of New Zealand universities have established and supported an independent programme in Cinema or Film Studies and its related subjects (Media and Television Studies, Visual Culture). The programmes at Auckland, Otago and Victoria are thriving because they attract a growing market of students keen to study cinema as the most popular of contemporary art forms. Similar growth can reasonably be expected at Canterbury.

Currently, no Cinema/Film Studies programmes in New Zealand are taught in the same department as theatre or performance. Nor do they require the inclusion of a theoretical and practical component in every individual class, as has been the case with the Department of Theatre and Film Studies at Canterbury. Where film production is offered within Film Studies programmes, it is most commonly confined to specialised production courses, which may or may not contain a theoretical component.


Canterbury
The relocation of Cinema Studies within the School of Humanities permits the development of new initiatives in teaching and research, and also provides the opportunity for coordinating the course offerings in Film across the College of Arts. There is considerable potential for growth in this area through forging strong connections with staff from related programmes in English, American Studies, Cultural Studies, Aotahi: School of Maori and Indigenous Studies, the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Art History and Theory, Philosophy, Gender Studies and Mass Communication, and by tailoring courses to appeal to the cohort of students from these disciplines.
The Cinema Studies programme has the potential to attract students from other Colleges and Schools (Science, Business and Economics, Engineering and Law). The existence of a Cinema Studies programme at Canterbury will serve to retain students who hitherto have gone to other universities to major in the discipline. The new programme will also provide clear pathways for students who have taken Film and Media Studies at secondary school. There is also likely to be increased enrolment from international students and students seeking to pursue postgraduate work in this field.
The courses offered by Cinema Studies, which focus upon film history, theory and criticism, will give students enrolled in the Filmmaking programme in the Centre for Fine Arts, Music and Theatre a deeper academic appreciation of cinema to complement their training as filmmakers. They will also provide good choices to fulfil the BFA requirements, which specify that eight courses be taken from outside the degree.
The Cinema Studies programme is committed to the Treaty of Waitangi and the University Profile to develop research and teaching programmes that contribute to “advance Maori knowledge, culture and identities.” A good collegial relationship has been formed with Aotahi: School of Maori and Indigenous Studies.



Acceptability

Summarise consultation already conducted with relevant student, academic, industrial, professional and other communities. If there is a professional registration or licensing body relevant to this area of study, it must be named and evidence of such consultation must be provided.

Consultation is not merely a request for support; it should also encourage critical examination of the proposal. Copies of e-mail correspondence or scanned hard copies of letters (black and white and low resolution) should be appended to the final proposal.

The proposal has been discussed and endorsed by the Pro Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Committee. It is supported by the Head of the School of Humanities. The consultation process has involved extensive discussions with Heads of School and Programme Corodinators who have an interest in Cinema Studies. There were numerous meetings conducted at the draft stage of the proposal between the Head of the School of Humanities and the proposers. The draft proposal was sent to:


Canterbury

  • All Academic Heads of Departments in the University of Canterbury

  • All Programme Coordinators in the College of Arts

  • University of Canterbury Students Association (Support Service Manager)

  • University of Canterbury Library

  • UCTL (University Centre of Teaching and Learning)

  • Student Recruitment and Development Unit

  • Facilities Management

  • Maori AVC

  • previous Honours students and other prospective students

New Zealand

  • Department of Film Television and Media, University of Auckland

  • Film Studies, Victoria University

  • Department of Media, Film and Communication, University of Otago

  • Screen and Media Studies, University of Waikato

  • Emeritus Professor Roger Horrocks

  • Allen Meek, Senior Lecturer, Media Studies, Massey University

  • John Farnsworth, School of Broadcasting

  • NAME (Canterbury) (National Association of Media Educators)

  • Screen Directors Guild

  • WIFT (Women in Film and Television)

  • New Zealand Film Archive

International

  • Professor Dudley Andrew, R. Seldon Rose Professor of Film and Comparative Literature, Yale University, USA

  • Professor Bruce Babington, Film and Visual Studies, University of Newcastle, UK

  • Professor Mike Budd, Former Department Chair and Founder of the Film and Media Studies programme, Florida Atlantic University, USA

  • Adrian Danks, Media Programme Director, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia

  • Professor Lucy Fisher, Distinguished Professor of English and Film Studies, Director of Film Studies, University of Pittsburgh, USA

  • Professor Krin Gabbard, Chair, Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, Stony Brook University, USA

  • Professor Susan Hayward, Director of Film Studies and Director of the Centre for Research into Film Studies, School of Modern Languages, University of Exeter, UK

  • Professor Andrew Horton, The Jeanne H. Smith Professor of Film and Video Studies, University of Oklahoma, US

  • Associate Professor Ramona Liera-Schwichtenberg, Chair, Women’s Studies, University of Wichita, USA

  • Aaron Magnan-Park, Assistant Professor, Department of Film, Television and Theatre,

University of Notre Dame, USA

  • Adrian Martin, Senior Research Fellow, Monash, Australia

  • Professor Nicholas Mirzoeff, Visual Culture, New York University, USA

  • Associate Professor Douglas Morrey, French Studies, University of Warwick, UK

  • Professor Patrice Petro, English and Film Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, President of the Society of Cinema and Media Studies, USA

  • Professor Phil Powrie, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Faculty of the Arts and Humanities, University of Sheffield, UK

  • Professor Susan Reilly, Director, School of Communication and Media Studies, Florida Atlantic University, USA

  • Professor Janet Staiger, William P. Hobby Centennial Professor in Communication and Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Department of Radio-Television-Film, University of Texas at Austin, USA

  • Professor Maureen Turim, Director of Film and Media Studies, University of Florida, USA

  • Professor Steven Ungar, Cinema and Comparative Literature, University of Iowa, USA

  • Associate Professor Phillip Wegner, English, University of Florida, USA


Summary of responses (Copies of the correspondence are available on request)

INTERNATIONAL

Reviewers expressed unanimous support for the creation of the new Cinema Studies programme. They endorsed the quality of the courses and the structure of the degree. There were a number of valuable suggestions for the future development of the programme. Certain reviewers thought that particular areas of study could be pursued further, such as Asian and Pacific cinema and current trends in digital film. Presently, we need to focus upon the Cinema Studies canon before exploring such specialised aspects of the discipline. However, these constructive comments are especially helpful in determining the future direction of the programme and the research focus of any new appointment in Cinema Studies.


NATIONAL

Reviewers once more were positive about the creation of the new Cinema Studies programme. They mainly focussed upon the position of the programme in relation to other disciplines and within the Humanities. A number of useful critical points were made concerning the structure of the programme, particularly the connection between the undergraduate and the postgraduate courses. Other suggestions were made as regards further areas of development, such as race in cinema, and possible strategies for growth.


We acknowledge that the Honours programme can be further enhanced by creating strong connections with other colleagues teaching in the Humanities. We will be working closely with the English Department to coordinate our offerings and to contribute to their postgraduate programme. Students will be encouraged to take Cinema Studies Honours papers as part of their postgraduate degree. Other arrangements for cross coding are in place with American Studies, Cultural Studies, Chinese, Gender Studies and Aotahi: the School of Maori and Indigenous Studies. We believe that these interdisciplinary connections are crucial for the development of Cinema Studies at Canterbury and will greatly enhance the viability of the programme for students.
CANTERBURY

The Cinema Studies proposal received positive support from colleagues in the School of Humanities and the Centre of Fine Arts Music and Theatre, specifically the Filmmaking programme in Fine Arts and the Department of English.


UCSA

We applaud and appreciate the efforts of the UCSA in coordinating the student consultation process. The report provides a fair and accurate assessment of student opinion. Obviously, we believe that the Cinema Studies proposal provides students with the opportunity to focus specifically on the critical study of film and also offers students a greater range of options in the construction of their BA degree.


The creation of the Cinema Studies programme should not prevent any student from pursuing practical work in film and/or performance studies. There are other venues within the Centre for Fine Arts, Music and Theatre that provide these options.
Undergraduate students currently enrolled in the Department of Theatre and Film Studies will be able to choose whether they would prefer to graduate with a BA in Theatre and Film Studies or with a BA in Cinema Studies; however, new students entering in 2010 will graduate within the new Cinema Studies programme.

UCTL

We met with the Director of UCTL and had a productive discussion of her comments about the Cinema Studies proposal. We will meet with her over the course of the coming year in order to continue planning the courses and assessments, and identify ways to further enhance the student learning experience.


TAFS (Department of Theatre and Film Studies)

We appreciate the concerns that have been expressed by the TAFS staff. We have responded to the best of our ability to all academic issues that have been raised in the process of consultation in the revised CUAP proposal. A number of meetings were also conducted in relation to the creation of the new Cinema Studies programme between the Head of the School of Humanities, the Director of the Centre for Fine Arts, Music and Theatre, and TAFS staff. The proposal has also been submitted and discussed at the PVC AC meetings twice where Resource issues were addressed and resolved. As recently as March 31st, we invited further comment upon the proposal before it was submitted to Faculty and have duly received a reply.

The relocation of Cinema Studies within the School of Humanities should complement the performance-based courses that the renamed TAFS Department will offer within the Centre for Fine Arts, Music and Theatre. Students will have the opportunity to construct their majors and minors in a variety of ways across our respective programmes.



Goals of the programme

A statement as to what the programme aims to achieve, the academic rationale on which it is based and how overall programme coherence is achieved.



The aim of the new programme is to create a strong identity, a clear vision and a positive future for Cinema Studies at the University of Canterbury. It aspires to promote a vibrant academic culture of students and scholars who are proficient in their knowledge of the discipline. It is committed to producing teaching and research that is current, original, comprehensive, and relevant.
The new Cinema Studies curriculum has been designed to meet the best international standards. The programme will provide coverage of key developments in film language, history and theory, with a particular focus upon their function in contemporary cinema. A number of courses, especially at 300 level, also offer an in-depth analysis of specific topics in Cinema Studies. Students will receive a unique perspective upon current trends and major traditions in film/cinema studies that is academically, pedagogically and intellectually challenging.

CINEMA STUDIES CURRICULUM


CINE Courses

Undergraduate:

CINE 101 What is Cinema? (Mary Wiles)

CINE 102 World Cinema in the 21st Century (Alan Wright)

CINE 103 New Zealand Film (not offered in 2010)


CINE 201 Hollywood and Genre (Mary Wiles)

CINE 202 Film and Theory (Alan Wright)
CINE 301 Film History: The Sixties and the New Wave (Mary Wiles)

CINE 302 Documentary: From the Margins to the Mainstream (Alan Wright)



Postgraduate:

CINE 401 Women, Theory, Film (Mary Wiles)

CINE 402 The Essay Film (Alan Wright)

CINE 403 National Cinema (not offered in 2010)

CINE 410 Supervised Research

CINE 690 MA Thesis

CINE 790 Film Studies PhD

Additional Courses:
CINE 210/ENGL 238 Writing for Film (Stuart Hoar, English)

CINE 211/AMST 214 Popular Culture and the Media (Kevin Glynn, American Studies)

CINE 212/AMST 223 Hardboiled LA: Los Angeles in Literature and Film (Leonard Wilcox, American Studies)

CINE 213/MAOR 268 Kiriata: Maori and Indigenous Film (Hamuera Kahi, Phillip Borell, Aotahi: School of Maori and Indigenous Studies)

CINE 214/EULC 204 European Novels and Film (Henrietta Mondry, Russian)

CINE 220 American Independent Film: 1960-2000 (Summer, Christian Long)

CINE 404 Chinese Audiovisual Narratives in the Age of Globalisation (Adam Lam, Chinese)
The coherence and integrity of the BA degree reflects the academic rationale of the programme. The courses are organised around two distinct poles. On the one hand, CINE 101, 103, 201, 210 and 301 analyse film form, style, genre, movements and periods. On the other, CINE 102, 202, and 302 address theoretical and methodological issues in Cinema Studies. Neither approach is mutually exclusive, of course. The structure of the major encourages students to think about film within an historical and a theoretical framework. Every class (with the exception of CINE 301, 302 and the proposed Summer School classes) will contain a variety of films and critical readings drawn from crucial junctures in the history of cinema: the era of silent film and the advent of sound (1896-1930s), the heyday of Hollywood and international art cinema (1939-1980s), the globalisation of film and contemporary world cinema (1990s-the present). As a result, students will acquire knowledge of the Cinema Studies canon and proficiency in the core competencies of the discipline, while gaining a critical awareness of recent developments in world cinema.

MAJORING AND MINORING INFORMATION:

Major:

Students intending to complete the BA with a major in Cinema Studies must be credited with at least 136 points in Cinema Studies which must include at least 100 points at 200 level or above, including the following:


100 level

Required: 18 points of 100 level Cinema Studies

Recommended: 36 points of 100 level Cinema Studies
200 level

Required: At least 44 points of 200 level Cinema studies


300 level

Required: At least 56 points of 300 level Cinema Studies


Major:

Recommended pathway for students majoring in Cinema Studies:





CINE 101










CINE 201 & CINE 202









CINE 301 & CINE 302

Plus any other 100 level or

200 level CINE course





Minor:

Students intending to complete the BA with a minor in Cinema Studies must be credited with at least 80 points in Cinema Studies, which must include at least 44 points at 200 level or above.


Recommended pathways for students minoring in Cinema Studies:
Minor One:

CINE 101 and either

CINE 102 or CINE 103







CINE 201 and CINE 202

Minor Two:


CINE 101 and either

CINE 102 or CINE 103







CINE 201 or CINE 202




Plus any other 200 level CINE course


FILM AT CANTERBURY:
Students interested in studying film at the University of Canterbury have a number of different options. Film is taught in Cinema Studies, Fine Arts, Media and Communication and Theatre and Film Studies.


Cinema Studies

(HUMS)

Filmmaking

(FAMT)

Media and Coms

(SAPS)

Theatre

(FAMT)



Cinema Studies takes the history, criticism and theory of film as its sole object of study. Filmmaking teaches the technical skills of film production. Media and Communication, as described on its website, focuses upon the “modern media of newspapers, television, radio, news agencies, magazines and internet.”* Theatre and Film Studies explores aspects of theatricality in film from a practical performance based perspective.

  • http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/subjects/coms/




Graduate profile

A statement of the generic and specific attributes and skills of graduates of the programme. This should include the body of knowledge attained, and development of lifelong learning skills.



A graduate in Cinema Studies is well positioned to seek out work in the creative and cultural sector, especially in the vital areas of film and multimedia. The film industry is not only limited to production, but also encompasses screenwriting, exhibition, promotion, preservation and education. A critical knowledge of film culture is necessary for Festival programmers and organisers, curators, archivists and film historians, cultural planners, policymakers and entrepreneurs. The skills acquired by a graduate in Cinema Studies are also valued in the related areas of television, interactive media (web design and video), advertising and journalism. Film is now offered as an important component of the secondary school curriculum and specialised teachers in film and media studies are in high demand. For those with an academic bent, postgraduate study can lead to rewarding career of teaching and research within the university.
Graduates of the Cinema Studies programme will have demonstrated the ability to:


  • analyse, interpret and understand key concepts, theories, and methodologies in film studies

  • examine and evaluate important trends and traditions in film history

  • identify and analyse the form and function of film language

  • view films critically and reflect upon their own role as spectators and consumers

  • write and research an academic essay that develops a critical argument

  • use the tools of the Library and the Internet for critical research

  • communicate ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral form

  • think independently and originally

The Learning Outcomes statement is available on request.



Programme overview

A brief narrative setting out the progression from the entry requirements to the end of the final year, identifying landmarks such as initial or intermediate selection processes, work placements, research projects.



The Course Outlines are available on request

Proposed new regulations and prescriptions (see Calendar Form at the end of Section A)

Include the proposed new regulations and/or amendments as they are intended to appear in the Calendar. List the proposed prescriptions for any new courses to be created by this proposal as they should appear in the Calendar. New courses also require the completion of an additional template (Template 4). List all transitional and consequential changes including discontinued courses.



The Calendar form is appended to the rear of this document.

Proposed teaching/delivery methods

An overview statement which describes how teaching in the programme will be structured. Explain any distinctive features of delivery and comment on the inclusion of practical applications, for example, a clinical component. If there is a contribution by another provider that contribution must be clearly identified and quantified as a percentage of the programme.



Lectures and tutorials.

Assessment procedures

A description of the types of assessment to be used. Indicate whether external assessors or examiners will be involved. See the Assessment Policy in the UC Policy Library.



At undergraduate level, assessment will be conducted by the course convenors. Grades will be counter assessed by the academic staff.
In 100 level courses, students will compose an essay designed to develop their ability to analyse films and use certain concepts and methods of the discipline. Short tests designed to measure competence in specific subject areas, and a comprehensive final exam, will be marked by tutors under the supervision and with the participation of the course convenor. A marking meeting will be held at the end of each semester to check the grades across all courses.
In 200 level courses, students will be responsible for two essays which will demonstrate their understanding of the major theoretical debates and discourses of Film/Cinema Studies and, also, their awareness of the complex relation between films and their cultural, social and historical contexts. In 200 level courses that address methodological issues, essays will be complemented by short response papers, focusing on specific conceptual and theoretical topics. Courses addressing genres and movements will include a comprehensive final exam.
In 300 level courses, students will be responsible for two essays in which they will not only demonstrate extensive knowledge of specific film movements and forms, but also demonstrate an advanced ability to interpret and critically analyse films. Students will also be encouraged to focus on specific areas of historical and theoretical interest in short response papers and to participate effectively and collaboratively within a group in an oral presentation.
At Honours level, students will be responsible for two essays and an oral presentation. Written assessment will be conducted by the course convenors and will be externally moderated by another Film or Cinema Studies programme in New Zealand. Postgraduate theses will be supervised by the appropriate staff member and assessed by an appointed team of internal and external examiners, in keeping with the University of Canterbury regulations.

Predicted student numbers/EFTS

An estimate of the likely enrolment and EFTS numbers for 3 years from the introduction of the programme, including any intention to limit enrolments.



EFTS have remained stable in the film-related courses in TAFS over the last few years. This year student numbers in Film Studies classes remain steady. The figures for 2006-2009 include all TAFS courses focussing on Film, and have been endorsed by the College Manager:

2006 25.75 EFTS

2007 30.85 EFTS

2008 28.60 EFTS

2009budget 27.56 EFTS
However, the mandatory filmmaking component in every TAFS film class acts to restrict enrolment and inhibit further growth. The relocation of the Cinema Studies programme in the School of Humanities will open up the discipline to a broader cohort of students and permit the development of new initiatives in teaching and research. At a conservative estimate, EFTS growth of approximately 10% per annum can be expected (much of the growth coming from the enrolment of students from outside the College of Arts). The 2008 EFTS figures for undergraduate Film Studies at Auckland were 132.77, with 60.75 at stage one. EFTS for undergraduate and postgraduate Film Studies at Victoria were 157.82 in 2008 and stand at 152.336 as of March 2009, and are anticipated to surpass last year’s total. Similar growth patterns can reasonably be expected at Canterbury.
Other departments in Arts will benefit from this EFTS growth via cross coded courses (eg, American Studies, English, Cultural Studies, Chinese, Maori and European Languages and Cultures). With a strong marketing strategy the future of Cinema Studies at the University of Canterbury is bright.


Resources

A statement summarising the impact of the proposal on UC’s resources and facilities as specified by ICTS, Facilities Management and the Library etc. Include reference to:

physical facilities

equipment

library resources

availability of appropriate expertise

access to practical and clinical placements (where appropriate)

UC strengths in related disciplines



Currently, screenings and some classes are conducted in A4, a lecture room that has been customised for the teaching of Cinema Studies. The AV Department supports and services this facility (full size screen, projector, speakers, DVD and VHS). As class sizes increase, particularly at stage one, it may be necessary to locate a further space appropriate for screenings and lectures.
The new Cinema Studies programme will need to locate an appropriate space to house and view its collection of DVDs and videos. It is necessary for students to review the films when preparing for essays and exams. There are a number of options available in the programme’s new location. In addition, the Central Library is in the process of upgrading its facilities for storing and watching audiovisual material, which will complement those available within the School of Humanities.
Staff have been provided with new office space closer to colleagues in the School of Humanities. A further room, with access to computers, will be required for tutors and postgraduate students.

Plans for monitoring programme quality

A clear statement of how programme quality will be monitored. This includes reviewing regulations, teaching quality, content and delivery, reviewing whether courses should be added or deleted. Such provisions should include the establishment of a small monitoring group to collect information in respect of student numbers, pass rates, retention, and student satisfaction, to prepare any peer or self-review reports and to compile the Graduating Year Review. See more on reviews, especially GYR.



  • The Programme will conduct an internal review of all course offerings and results annually.

  • Students will evaluate all classes, teaching and supervision through the STU survey. They may also submit their own recommendations and responses through the Class Rep or directly to the teaching staff at regular Staff/Student Liaison meetings.

  • Peer review of course offerings and student work by a fully qualified External Moderator from a comparable academic programme.

  • Mentoring: regular meetings with Head of School of Humanities and senior academics in the School of Humanities

  • Graduating Year Review after three years.

Confirmation that Section B has been prepared and is available to CUAP on request

Section B has been prepared and is available on request



University of Canterbury

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha



Calendar Form


New Qualification Regulations




Add regulations as they will appear in the 2010 Calendar.

Majoring and Minoring Information

Cinema Studies

School of Humanities

2009 UC Calendar Page 229 Insert after Chinese


Cinema Studies
Major:

Students intending to complete the BA with a major in Cinema Studies must be credited with at least 136 points in Cinema Studies which must include at least 100 points at 200 level or above, including the following:

100 level

Required: 18 points of 100 level Cinema Studies

Recommended: 36 points of 100 level Cinema Studies

200 level

Required: At least 44 points of 200 level Cinema studies

300 level

Required: At least 56 points of 300 level Cinema Studies
Minor:

Students intending to complete the BA with a minor in Cinema Studies must be credited with at least 80 points in Cinema Studies which must include at least 44 points at 200 level or above.


Schedule
2009 UC Calendar page 245 insert after Chinese
Cinema Studies
Course Code Course Title pts P/C/R/RP/EQ
CINE 101 What is Cinema? 18 S1
CINE 102 World Cinema

in the 21st Century 18 S2 R: TAFS 102


CINE 103 New Zealand Film 18 NO R: TAFS 104
CINE 201 Hollywood and Genre 22 S1 P: any 18 pts of CINE at

Stage 1 (CINE 101 or CINE

CINE 102 or CINE 103) or

equivalent preparation

with approval of Programme

Coordinator.



CINE 202 Film and Theory 22 S2 P: any 18 pts of CINE at

Stage 1 (CINE 101 or CINE

CINE 102 or CINE 103) or

equivalent preparation

with approval of Programme

Coordinator. RP: CINE 201



CINE 210 Writing for Film 22 S1 R: ENGL 234, ENGL 238

EQ: ENGL 238




CINE 211 Popular Culture 22 S2 P: any 18 pts of CINE at

and the Media Stage 1 (CINE 101 or CINE

CINE 102 or CINE 103) or

equivalent preparation

with approval of Programme

Coordinator. R: AMST 214

AMST 330, CULT 204, DRAM 211,

AMST 333 EQ: AMST 214, CULT 204



CINE 212 Hardboiled LA: 22 S2 P: any 18 pts of CINE at

Los Angeles in Literature Stage 1 (CINE 101 or CINE

and Film CINE 102 or CINE 103) or

equivalent preparation

with approval of Programme

Coordinator. R: AMST 223 AMST 326,

ENGL 237. EQ: AMST 223, ENGL 237
CINE 213 Kiriata: Maori 22 S2 P: any 18 pts of CINE at Stage 1

and Indigenous Film (CINE 101 or CINE 102 or CINE 103)

or equivalent preparation with

approval of Programme Coordinator.

R: MAOR 268. EQ: MAOR 268
CINE 214 European Novels 22 S1 P: any 18 pts of CINE at Stage 1

and Film Adaptations (CINE 101 or CINE 102 or CINE 103)

or equivalent preparation with

approval of Programme Coordinator.

R: EULC 204/304. EQ EULC 204/304


CINE 220 American Independent 22 SU1 P: any 72 points, or

Cinema 1960-2000 equivalent preparation

with approval of Programme

Coordinator. RP: CINE

101, CINE 102, CINE 103

CINE 301 Film History: The Sixties

and the New Wave 28 S1 P: CINE 201 and CINE 202,

TAFS 216, TAFS 217, or

appropriate courses in

Film Studies with approval

of Programme Coordinator.




CINE 302 Documentary: 28 S2 P: CINE 201 and CINE 202,

From the Margins to TAFS 216, TAFS 217, or

the Mainstream appropriate courses in

Film Studies with approval

of Programme Coordinator.
Page 303 2009 Calendar Certificate in Arts Regulations

Add “Cinema Studies” after “Chinese” in the Subjects available listing.


Page 322 2009 Calendar Graduate Diploma in Arts Regulations

Add “Cinema Studies” after “Chinese” in Regulation 1




Page 325 2009 Calendar BA(Hons) Regulations

Add after Chinese


Cinema Studies

Four courses from CINE 401 -410 which must include CINE 410 Supervised Research. Enrolment in any course is subject to the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator.

P: Any 56 points at 300 level In Cinema Studies with an average of B or above.
Page 330 2009 Calendar MA Regulations

Add after Chinese


Cinema Studies

A thesis (CINE 690) on a topic selected in consultation with the student’s supervisor.

P: BA(Hons) in Cinema Studies with First Class Honours or Second Class Honours Division 1.
Page 339 Schedule 2. Add after Chinese

Cinema Studies na 4 2 years 4 years available only by part II.


Page 449 2009 Calendar PhD Regulations

Regulation 1 (c) add after Chinese

Cinema Studies(CINE)

Page 517 2009 UC Calendar insert after Chinese



Prescriptions/Course Catalogue

Cinema Studies

School of Humanities
CINE 101 What is Cinema?

18 points 0.1500 EFTS


An introduction to the fundamental principles of film form and style. Each class

focuses up focuses upon a specific filmmaking technique in order to analyse its cinematic

function and function and effect.

CINE 101-10S1 (C) Semester 1


CINE 102 World Cinema in the 21st Century

18 points 0.1500 EFTS


This course charts recent trends in world cinema in the light of the political,

artistic and technological changes that have affected film since 2000.

R: TAFS 102

CINE 102-10S2 (C) Semester 2



CINE 103 New Zealand Film

18 points 0.1500 EFTS


This course traces the development of a national cinema in New Zealand by

analysing how film is used to project a sense of cultural identity.

R: TAFS 104

Not offered in 2010



CINE 201 Hollywood and Genre

22 points 0.1833 EFTS


An historical and critical study of genre in Hollywood film. Students will

analyse the evolution and transformation of the conventions of key genres, such as the Science Fiction film, the Musical, Film Noir and Horror.

P: Any 18 points of CINE at Stage 1 (CINE 101, CINE 102 or CINE 103) or equivalent

preparation with approval of Programme Coordinator.

CINE 201-10S1 (C) Semester 1

CINE 202 Film and Theory

22 points 0.1833 EFTS


The class sets the foundations for a working knowledge of the major debates that

have informed Cinema Studies. Students will gain the necessary tools to use and

understand the language of film theory and criticism.

P: Any 18 points of CINE at Stage 1 (CINE 101, CINE 102 or CINE 103) or equivalent

preparation with approval of Programme Coordinator.

RP: CINE 201

CINE 202-10S2 (C) Semester 2

CINE 210 Writing for Film

22 points 0.1833 EFTS


The objective of the course is to combine the development of students' creative writing

with the practical skills and dramaturgic techniques of writing for film.

R: ENGL 234, ENGL 238 EQ: ENGL 238

CINE 210-10S1 (C) Semester 1


CINE 211 Popular Culture and the Media

22 points 0.1833 EFTS


This course introduces key theories and concepts designed to understand

contemporary mass media from a variety of culturalist perspectives. Its emphasis

is on television and its audiences but it will refer to film and other media

as well.


R: AMST 330, CULT 204, DRAM 211, AMST 333 EQ: AMST 214, CULT 204

CINE 211-10S2 (C) Semester 2



CINE 212 Hardboiled LA: Los Angeles in Literature and Film

22 points 0.1833 EFTS


This course examines modern and postmodern representations of Los Angeles.

Specifically, the course explores ways in which the genre of “LA Noir” (in fiction

and film) has been refigured as Los Angeles increasingly becomes the postmodern

environment par excellence.

R: AMST 326, ENGL 237 EQ: AMST 223, ENGL 237

CINE 212-10S2 (C) Semester 2



CINE 213 Kiriata: Maori and Indigenous Film

22 points 0.1833 EFTS

This paper examines the political, historical, social cultural and ideological

influences that have shaped dominant mainstream constructions and counter-hegemonic

representations of Maori and indigenous peoples in film and documentary.

EQ: MAOR 268

CINE 213-10S2 (C) Semester 2

CINE 214 European Novels and Film Adaptations

22 points 0.1833 EFTS

A study of important European novels and film adaptations.

EQ: EULC 204/304

CINE 214-10S1 (C) Semester 1

CINE 220 American Independent Cinema 1960-2000

22 points 0.1833 EFTS

This class analyses the ways in which American independent cinema distinguishes

itself from mainstream major-studio productions in terms of narrative, themes,

styles and audience.

P: any 72 points, or equivalent preparation with approval of Programme

Coordinator.

CINE 220-10Sum1 (C) Summer 1



CINE 301 Film History: The Sixties and the New Wave

28 points 0.2333 EFTS


A survey of the New Wave movements which swept cinema in the 60’s, with an

emphasis on the nouvelle vague in France.

P: CINE 201 and CINE 202, TAFS 216, TAFS 217 or appropriate courses in Cinema

Studies with approval of Programme Coordinator.

CINE 301-10S1 (C) Semester 1

CINE 302 Documentary: From the Margins to the Mainstream

28 points 0.2333 EFTS


This course examines the artistic and political principles that govern the

representation of reality in contemporary documentary film.

P: CINE 201 and CINE 202, TAFS 216, TAFS 217 or appropriate courses in Cinema

Studies with approval of Programme Coordinator.

CINE 302-10S2 (C) Semester 2
Postgraduate

Note: Postgraduate courses may be subject to change. For up-to-date information,

students are advised to check www.canterbury.ac.nz/courses or consult the relevant

School/Department.


CINE 401 Women/Theory/Film

0.2500 EFTS


This course investigates the changing place of women in film: as a glamorised

spectacle and cultural commodity, as spectators and consumers, and also as creators

and theorists.

P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

R: GEND 413, TAFS 406

EQ: GEND 413

CINE 401-10S1 Semester 1

CINE 402 The Essay Film

0.2500 EFTS


This course studies the essay film, a hybrid genre which troubles conventional

distinctions between documentary and fiction, as the model for a new mode of

critical practice.

P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

CINE 402-10S2 Semester 2

CINE 403 National Cinema

0.2500 EFTS


This course explores the concept of national cinema and the role and function of

film in projecting national identity in a globalised world.

P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

Not offered in 2010



CINE 404 Chinese Audiovisual Narratives in the Age of Globalisation

0.2500 EFTS


Using contemporary Chinese narrative films, TV programmes, and/or theatrical works

(most with English subtitles, the remainder in English translation) as primary

texts, this course analyses the survival and success of these national AV narratives

in the age of globalisation

R: CHIN 411, CULT 408

EQ: CHIN 411, CULT 408

CINE 404-10W (C) Whole Year (S1 and S2)

CINE 410 Supervised Research

0.2500 EFTS

P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

CINE 410-10S1 Semester 1

CINE 410-10S2 Semester 2

CINE 690 MA Thesis

1.0 EFTS


P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

CINE 690-10A Starts Anytime

Note: Part-time enrolment (0.65 EFTS) is available on approval.
CINE 790 Cinema Studies PhD

1.0 EFTS


P: Subject to approval of the Programme Coordinator

CINE 790-10A Starts Anytime



Note: Part-time enrolment (0.65 EFTS) is available on approval.






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