Contents introduction theoretical part




Yüklə 225.09 Kb.
səhifə3/4
tarix25.04.2016
ölçüsü225.09 Kb.
1   2   3   4
. ( see APPENDIX 13)

Original materials for activities using in the lessons - Teacher–in-Role – questions ( see APPENDIX 9)



Stage/time

Interaction

Activities

Pre-reading

Warm up
10 mins



Whole class + teacher



Teacher–in-Role



Reading

Activity 1

15 mins


Whole class + teacher

Doodle and listen

Reading

Activity 2

10 mins


Pairs

Ordering pictures

Reading

Activity 3


15 mins

Pairs

Ordering parts of the story

Reading

Activity 4

10 mins


Whole class

+ teacher



Jumbled events

After-reading

Activity 1

10 mins


Whole class + teacher

What happens next?

After-reading

Activity 2

10 mins


Whole class

+ teacher



Theme background of the novel

After-reading

Activity 3

10 mins for instructions


Whole class

+ teacher



Students´ project
Lesson procedure:

Instructions:

Pre-reading activity: Warm up: Teacher–in-Role – In this activity students guess the name of the main character of the novel – Robinson Crusoe by allowing them to ask questions focused on true life events of the main character Robinson Crusoe who is acted by a teacher. Students sit in the circle and ask the teacher who is in the middle of the circle. Students draw prepared questions from teacher´s hat. After answering all target questions, students guess the name of the character who is supposed to be known by them. ( see APPENDIX 9 ) Activities based on role plays provide many creations and can be used for various purposes. ( Collie and Slater 1992: 77 )

Reading activity: Activity 1: Doodle and listen – to involve students in the atmosphere of the novel by using imagination and fantasy through reading a simplified extract from the chapter 3 called The storm and the shipwreck. Teacher reads the extract with such an intonation to evoke to students the real feeling of the situation, during reading students draw their feelings on paper. ( see APPENDIX 10 )

This activity is a combination of listening and creativity activities. Students listens to a tape or to teacher reading and at the end of the listening they draw their feelings. (Collie and Slater 1992: 151 )

Reading activity: Activity 2 : Ordering pictures - Teacher prepares some pictures taken from the internet or copied from ilustrated book Robinson Crusoe. Next, students are given the pictures to make a story about Robinson Crusor. They put the pictures in the correct order to create the story. ( see APPENDIX 11 A )

Reading activity: Activity 3: Ordering parts of the story – Teacher prepares some slips of paper and put there short extracts from the simplified version of the novel. Students read and put in correct order parts of the story and match them with correct pictures from previous activity. ( see APPENDIX 11B )

Reading activity: Activity 4: Jumbled events – to read the extract from original version of the novel – chapter 5 - based on the Robinson Crusoe´s diary and put together the dates and events included in the diary. ( see APPENDIX 12 ) Students are given a jumbled list of a certain number of events to place them in the correct sequence. (Collie and Slater 1992: 46 )

After-reading activity: Activity 1: What happens next? – to discuss possible continuations of the story. To say what students think Robinson Crusoe did next when he went home to England.



T: What do you think Robinson Crusoe did when he went home to England?

What did he do? Did he married? What about his friend Friday? Did Friday married?

Teacher can give students some hints to start discussion.



I think that..... In my opinion.....Personally, I think.......
After discussion it is possible to assign homework based on home reading of the simplified extract - chapter 5 where there is the actual continuation of the story. Students discuss possible continuation of the story. (Collie and Slater 1992: 33 )

After-reading activity: Activity 2 : Theme background of the novel – to acquaint students with the character background of the novel connected with the true story of Alexander Selkirk which inspired novelist Daniel Defoe took the theme for his novel Robinson Crusoe. Teacher can pass round the class the portrait of Daniel Defoe taken from the internet. ( see APPENDIX 13)



T: This is Daniel Defoe, the author of the novel Robinson Crusoe. Pass round the picture and think why he wrote such a story, what his inspiration was, if he met Robinson Crusoe.

Then, students are read the short article taken from the internet about Alexander Selkirk and are motivated to search more information. ( see APPENDIX 13 )

After-reading activity: Activity 3 : Students´ project - to give instruction about a project called ‘ The real Robinson Crusoe which is aimed at the character background of the novel and based on the information search about Alexander Selkirk on the internet in IT lessons. Students present their own concept of the project.

Alexander Selkirk

was born as Alexander Selcraig, in 1676.

The son of a shoemaker and tanner in

Lower Largo, Fife, Scotland.

In 1703 he joined famed privateer

and explorer William Dampier on the

galleon Cinque Ports as sailing master.

The following year, in October,

the Cinque Ports was stopped over at

the uninhabited island for a mid-expedition

restock of supplies and fresh water.

The ship had problems and he decided

to wait for another ship on the island.

He took with him a musket, gunpowder,

carpenter's tools, a knife, a Bible, and his

clothing. He spent alone four years and

four months on the island.

Selkirk was discovered on the island

by the Duke's Captain,

Woodes Rogers, who called him the Governor

of the island.

In 1717 he returned to Lower Largo.

He died at 8 p.m. on December 13,1721. He

was buried at sea off the west coast of

Africa. On 1 January 1966 the island on

which Selkirk stayed was officially renamed



Robinson Crusoe Island.

At the same moment, the most western

island of the Juan Fernández Islands was

renamed Alexander Selkirk Island although

Selkirk probably never saw that island.

This project was created by Jiří Beran, Robert Jurásek, Helena Kühnová a Ondřej Pospíšil – 9.A.



Evaluation of the lessons:

Working on this literary project I proceed from the assumption that students have heard or read about the novel Robinson Crusoe.

I chose this novel in order to start with a familiar one to increase students´ in the activities. Initially, students had a problem with concentration during listening to the first extract but then they became more and more involved in the plot of the story.

As a result, students succeeded in all activities. Some students who are on a very low level of English and one student with dyslexia had problems with reading the original extracts of the novel because they did not understand the vocabulary and the extracts seemed to be too long for them. On that account, I decided to make two versions of this activity. The first version for students who are on a very good level of English using original extracts and the second version for students who are on a low level of English or have some special learning needs using adapted extracts. It is a good idea to acquire an audiobook tape of the novel to create better atmosphere for activity focused on students´ imagination. Teacher´s reading works fine but cannot provide all the special sounds which are on the tape.

In conclusion, students improved their reading, listening skills and creative, imaginative abilities. They extended their vocabulary. In the activity called Teacher–in–Role students did not have any problems to guess the name of the main character of the novel. As I supposed they have ever heard about this novel. In the activity called What happens next? students presented some interesting ideas about the continuations of the story. The most frequented ones were that Robinson Crusoe got married and had a child or came back to his island.

4.3 LESSON PLAN – LITERARY PROJECT -

THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN

Time: 90 minutes

Level: Pre-intermediate ( the ninth grade at primary school )

Aims:

One of the main aim is to emphasise the values of friendship, freedom, independence versus slavery in America in the nineteenth century. Students will be acquainted with the basis facts relating to slavery and racism against African American people in America.



Subsidiary Aims:

Students develop their reading, listening skills and from grammar point of view they practise using present continuous tense in Dramatic adaptation activity. Next, students practise work with dictionaries during looking up new words included in the literary extracts. Through this novel based on adventurous story students receive general knowledge they can use in other school subjects.



Assumptions:

Students have some familiarity of the notion ‘slavery ‘ in America from History and Civics lessons. Moreover, they have some geographical knowledge about American rivers, states and living conditions in the nineteenth century .



Teaching aids and sources:

Printed original extract - chapter 7 taken from the internet Bibliomania, Free Online



Literature with more than 2000 Classic Texts. 21 July 2006 <http://www.bibliomania.com/0/-/frameset.html> ( see APPENDIX 14 )

Copies from the simplified version – chapters 1 – 5 – Mark Twain, retold by Diane Mowat. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-19-422820-0.

Cassette – chapters 1 , 2 - Mark Twain, read by William Defirst. Huckleberry Finn. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996. ISBN 0-19-422782-0

Original materials for dramatic adaptation activity using in the lessons – cards with situations. ( see APPENDIX 29 )

Card with the picture of Huck and Jim p. 20 taken from the simplified version.of the novel. Mark Twain, simplified by D.K. Swan, illustrated by Chris Molan. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. London: Longman Classics, 1996. ISBN 0-582-03585-6

Czech-English , English-Czech dictionaries




Stage/time

Interaction

Activities:

Pre-reading
Warm up
5 mins

Whole class + teacher



Hangman

Reading

Activity 1

10 mins


Individually

Listening in class

Reading

Activity 2

15 mins


Whole class

Reading in class

Reading

Activity 3

10 mins


Whole class + teacher

What happens next?

Reading

Activity 4

15 mins


Group work

Dramatic adaptation

After-reading

Activity 1

10 mins


Individually

Listening in the class

After-reading

Activity 2

10 mins


Whole class + teacher

Comprehension check


After-reading

Activity 3

5 mins


Individually

Letters

After-reading

Activity 4

10 mins for instructions


Group work

Students´ project
Lesson procedure:

Instructions:

Pre-reading activity: Warm up: Hangman – Students guess the name of the main character in the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by filling in the missing letters in his name. Teacher writes the first and the last letters of his name on the board and students play Hangman.

Reading activity: Activity 1: Listening in class – Students listen to the first chapter of the simplified version called Huck in trouble. (Collie and Slater 1992: 66 )

Reading activity: Activity 2 : Reading in class - Students read the first chapter of the simplified version called Huck in trouble. Students have copies of the first chapter and take turns in reading aloud. Next, as a feedback teacher can check the comprehension of the text by asking questions.



T: Where does Huck live? What is his friend´s name? Has he got a father? Is his father a good man?

Reading activity: Activity 3 : What happens next? – The class discusses possible continuations of the story. To say how students think Huck escaped from Pop´s hut. Next, teacher reads and students follow two original extracts on their copies of the chapter 7 of the novel The Adventures of the Huckleberry Finn relating to Huck´s escaping from Pop´s hut and finally being free on Jackson´s Island. ( see APPENDIX 14 )

Reading activity: Activity 4: Dramatic adaptation – Students are divided in groups of three and asked to prepare a dramatised version of the situations from the chapter 7 about Huck´s escaping from Pop´s hut. Students choose the cards with written situations from teacher´s hat. ( see APPENDIX 15 )

After-reading activity: Activity 1: Listening in class – Students listen to a part of the chapter 2 on the tape. There is a continuation of the story which describes meeting Huck with his friend Jim – Miss Watson´s slave. Students are presented the picture of Jim and Huck in their canoe. ( see APPENDIX 16 )


After-reading activity: Activity 2: Comprehension check – Students are asked questions about Jim to check correct comprehension of the previous listening acttivity.

What is the Huck´s friend name? Who is Jim? Why did Jim think that Huck is dead? Why did Jim escape? Is Jim happy? What does ‘slave ‘mean?

Students look up new words ‘slave ‘ and ‘ nigger ‘ in the dictionaries and add other words they consider to be connected with these words.

After-reading activity: Activity 3: Letters - Home reading –In this activity students read some chapter from the simplified version of the novel The Adventures of the Huckleberry Finn. Students are divided into four groups by drawing the numbers 3, 4, 5, 6 from the teacher´s hat and then they get the copy of the chapter 3, 4, 5 or 6 with corresponding number. Teacher assigns homework to read the chapter, and according to the chapter, write a short letter on Huck´s behalf in which Huck describes what has happened in his adventures after his meeting with Jim. In the following lesson all letters will be placed on the board in the classroom. (Collie and Slater 1992: 87)
After-reading activity: Activity 4: Students´ project - This project is called Martin Luther King´s dream is real ! and is devoted to Martin Luther King. Teacher prepares a short article and photo of Martin Luther King. All needed material is taken from the internet. ( see APPENDIX 17 )Through this material students are acquainted with Martin Luther King´s life. Next, they come up with the slogans which appeal to Martin Luther King´s approach to people and the world. Teacher can write down the students´ ideas on the board. In the following lesson students use computers to prepare project about Martin Luther King based on using slogans from previous English lessons.



WE HELP PEOPLE IN NEED ! WE RESPECT OTHER PEOPLE !

WE FIGHT AGAINST RACISM ! WE PROTECT THE NATURE !

WE ARE HONEST ! WE ARE EQUAL !

WE ARE PEACE-LOVING! WE LOVE FREEDOM !

WE WANT TO STUDY ! WE HATE WARS !

Martin Luther King Jr., after his arrest in February of 1956 at the age of 27. He had been arrested during the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The mug shot was found in July, 2004, during the cleaning out of a storage room at the Montgomery County Sheriff's Department. Someone had written "DEAD" twice on the picture, as well as 4-4-68, the date King was killed, though it is not known who wrote it.


King is perhaps most famous for his "I Have a Dream"speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
The Lorraine Motel, where Rev. King was assassinated, now the site of the National Civil Rights Museum.

This project was created by all class 9.A.



Evaluation of the lessons:

This literary project was difficult to prepare into 90-minute lesson plan because there are lots of topics teacher can include in lessons. I put stress on the basic theme relating to value of friendship and freedom in the world today. I was surprised by various opinions on the question of racism in my class. Some students had a big problem to accept the idea of equality for all people and I felt that they were prejudiced against black people or other races in the world. By including this novel in English lessons students were presented the ideas of freedom, equality and peace in the world through an adventurous story. Working on students´ project called Martin Luther King´s dream is real !showed the new view of racism problems and helped students change their mind about equality for all people in the world.

From language point of view, students improved listening, reading, writing and speaking skills in the lessons. Moreover, they enriched their vocabulary and communicative abilities. In the activity called ‘ What happens next? ‘ students mostly suggested the ideas that Huck killed Pop or he came back to widow Douglas.

The problem I had to solve referred to a misapprehension in the meaning of the word ‘ niggers ‘ for this reason students were explained that both Huck and Jim call black people ‘ niggers ‘ because it was the usual word at that place and time even if it is not used in the same meaning today.



4.4 LESSON PLAN – LITERARY PROJECT - FRANKENSTEIN

Time: 90 minutes

Level: Pre-intermediate ( the ninth grade at primary school )

Aims:

Students will be acquainted with the novel called Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. The importance of the strong moral aspect of the novel is to present the idea of ‘ Noble Savage ‘ represented by the character of the malformed ‘ Monster ‘. Students will reflect on the value of external and internal beauty of the human being.


Subsidiary Aims:

Students will develop their reading and listening skills from language point of view. On the other hand, they will cultivate their social and moral attitudes to human society.



Assumptions:

Students are assumed that they will be interested in this novel due to its mysterious, almost horrifying plot of the story. Despite this fact, the novel offers a strong point that a human being is only a part of nature and should not become a master of nature.



Teaching aids and sources:

Printed original extracts - chapter 11 taken from the internet Bibliomania, Free Online Literature with more than 2000 Classic Texts. 21 July 2006 <http://www.bibliomania.com/0/-/frameset.html>. ( see APPENDIX 19)

Original materials for activities called Montage using in the lessons. (see APPENDIX 18 )

Plot summaries and biography of Mary Shelley useful for teachers is taken from the internet: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 21 July 2006

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azrefs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə