Bridge to Intermediate ~ the basic rhythms




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Bridge to Intermediate ~ the basic rhythms

  • Each beat of a rhythm is divided into 4 sections. The “down beat” is the “one” “two” “three” “four” etc of a count. If you were clapping along, this is where your hands would clap. The “up beat” is the “and” between beats, if you were clapping along your hands would be at their farthest from each other at this point. Between these are the “ee” and the “ah”, so that each even measure beat is broken into 4: “one, ee, and, ah, two, ee, and, ah” etc.

  • When describing the sound of a rhythm you will hear these terms: “doom” “tek” and “ka”. The “doom” is the deep sound that comes from hitting the drum in the center, and is played on the finger cymbals by striking them off center and letting them ring, it is notated here with a capital D. The “tak” is a treble sound made by hitting the drum near the rim and is played on the cymbals by clapping them together straight on and not letting them ring, it is notated here with an upper case T. The “ka” is simply the other half of a tek (ie: “tekka”). Of equal importance is the rest, or a part of the beat when the drum/cymbals are not hit, it is noted here with a lower case r in the rhythm line and a – in the finger cymbal line. Below the lengthwise notation of the rhythm you’ll also find finger cymbal patterns for which hand is being used. Capital R is for your dominant hand (right for those who write with their right hand) and capital L for the non-dominant hand.

  • The notation here describes the skeleton of the rhythms, they are often played with “decoration”, or extra flourishes. A good rhythm CD will have examples of them played both ways.

  • When playing cymbals you do not have to play the rhythm the drummer is playing, you can use any of the cymbal patterns covered at the start or even play an interpretation of the melody. These cymbal patterns are also an excellent way to build dexterity with the instrument. These patterns can be played with any combination of ringing, clapping, and clicking.

Cymbal Patterns:

4s: simply hit the cymbals for each part of the beat, you can use it to any even tempo rhythm.



1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

L

Triples: start with your dominant hand, and start on the “and a” of the beat. Also can be used for any even rhythm.

&

A

1

E

&

A

2

E

R

L

R

-

R

L

R

-

The two above can be combined into many patterns, some common ones used for 4/4 time are:

3, 5, 5 (you can say “one two three, one two three four five, one two three four five” as you play, just remember that that is not the count of the beat in the music)

&

a

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

3

e

&

a

4

e

R

L

R

-

R

L

R

L

R

-

R

L

R

L

R

-

3, 3, 7

&

a

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

3

e

&

a

4

e

R

L

R

-

R

L

R

-

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

-

Malfoof: 2/4 time, the name means wrapped. It is often used for intros and the chasse is a perfect fit. It is an exception to the “ee, ahs are played on the non-dominant hand so the left can add ornamentation” guideline.





1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

D

r

ka

T

r

ka

T

r

R

-

R

L

-

R

L

-

Wahida: 4/4 time, this is often played under a takseem. It is the same pattern as the malfoof, but played half as fast.



1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

D




r




T




T




r




T




T




r




R




-




R




R




-




R




R




-



Ayuub: 2/4, used for Zaar (a Pagan exorcism ritual still practiced despite being outlawed by Islam.) and, if it is played fast, for intros.



1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

D

r

r

ka

D

r

T

r

R

-

-

L

R

-

R

-

Chiftitelli: 8/4, popular for floorwork in American and Turkish styles and for takseem. The last 3 rests are often filled in with ornamentation.





1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

5

E

&

A

6

E

&

A

7

E

&

A

8

E

&

A

D




r




T




T




r




T




T




r




D




r




T




r




T




r




r




r




R




-




R




R




-




R




R




-




R




-




R




-




R




-




-




-




Masmuudi Kabir: 8/4, the name means “big masmuudi”. Sometimes the first rest is played as a duum, it is the beledi (see next) rhythm taking the scenic route.


1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

5

E

&

A

6

E

&

A

7

E

&

A

8

E

&

A

D










D










r










T










D










r










T










r










R










R










-










R










R










-










R










-









Masmuudi saghir: 4/4, the small masmuudi (remember by the S in the name) as the rhythm is called in Egypt. In America and the Levant is it called “beledi” and is the most famous. If you are in a drum circle this might be



“the bellydance rhythm”. Also included on the last 2 lines is an ornamented version.

1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

D




D




r




T




D




r




T




r




R




R




-




R




R




-




R




-




D




D




T

Ka

T




D




T

Ka

T




r




R




R




R

L

R




R




R

L

R




-




Maqsuum: 4/4, aka “wahida w noss” (one and a half) or “bambi Sa’idi” it is like beledi with the second duum replaced by a tek.



1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

D




T




r




T




D




r




T




r




R




R




-




R




R




-




R




-



Sa’idi: 4/4, means “of the sa’id”, which is Upper (Southern) Egypt. It is used in all sorts of music, including modern pop, but originates from this region. Sometimes described as an “inside out beledi” because the 2 duums come after the one duum, it has a beautiful heavy sound.




1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

D




T




r




D




D




r




T




r




R




R




-




R




R




-




R




-



Nawari: 4/4, often confused with sa’idi. This rhythm frequently is used for dabke, a Lebanese line dance, which can also be done to 6/8 time. Both styles can use a cane, but in a different way, which adds to the confusion for dancers who are only taught the sa’idi rhythm. This is one of the very few rhythms that does

not start with a Duum on the one.


1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

3

E

&

A

4

E

&

A

T




D




r




T




D




r




T




r




R




R




-




R




R




-




R




-



Fallahi: 2/4, it is used in folk dance and the baladi progression. It is sometimes written as a fast 4/4, but because it is so filled in many prefer to play it as a 2/4.



1

E

&

A

2

E

&

A

D

ka

T

ka

D

ka

T

r

R

L

R

L

R

L

R

-

Karshilimah: 9/8, used to be used in Arabic and Egyptian music, but now is primarily Turkish. It was an integral part of the full American Restaurant show, providing a lively ending, and comes from Rom folk dance, although the accents of the rhythm will be different when played in the Romani style. It takes some getting used to ^_~. This is the orientale version.




1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

D

Tekka

D

Tekka

D

Tekka

T

T

T

R

R, L

R

R, L

R

R, L

R

L

R




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