B. E. Rollin Syllabus A: The Nature of Ethics Weeks 1 & 2




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PHIL 666/CM 666 Science and Ethics

B.E. Rollin


Syllabus
A: The Nature of Ethics
Weeks 1 & 2: The Nature of Philosophy. Personal, social, and professional ethics. Ethical theory--dealing with ethical issues in a rational way. The nature of ethical change. Ethical theory. Teleological and deontological ethical theory. Overview of biomedical science and ethics issues.
Week 1 - No readings

Week 2Science & Ethics, Chapters 1-3
B. Values in Science--Theoretical Framework

Week 3: Is Science "Value-free" and "Ethics-free"? Scientific ideology and the denial of values and ethics in science. The example of antibiotic resistance. The denial of consciousness.
Readings:

a) Science & Ethics, Chapter 3

b) B.E. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry: Animal Consciousness, Animal Pain and Science (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1990), Chapters 1-3, especially chapter one.

c) B.E. Rollin, “Ethics, Science, and Antimicrobial Resistance.”



Week 4: Values and Scientific Change: The valuational basis for scientific change. The legitimacy of talking about animal consciousness as a historical case in point.
Readings: B.E. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry, Chapters 3 and 4.
C. Some Major Ethical Issues in Science
Week 5: Human Subjects in Research. Historical background and current policy.
Readings:

a) Science & Ethics, Chapter 4

b) Jay Katz, "The regulation of human experimentation in the United States--a personal odyssey."

c) OPRR Reports, "Protection of human subjects."

d) Cases--1)Baby Fae; 2) Willowbrook, 3) Psychosurgery, 4) Artificial Heart.

e) Willowbrook Letters.

f) Paul Ramsey, "Judgment on Willowbrook."



Weeks 6 & 7: Animal Subjects in Research
Week 6: Historical background, and current safeguards. The emerging social ethic for animals. The scientific reality of animal pain and suffering.
Readings:

a) Science & Ethics, Chapter 5



b) Carl Cohen, "The case for the use of animals in biomedical research," from New England Journal of Medicine.

c) S.F. Sapontzis, "The case against invasive research with animals." From B.E. Rollin and M.L. Kesel (eds.), The Experimental Animal in Biomedical Research, Volume I (Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1990)

d) B.E. Rollin, "Ethics and research animals: theory and practice." From: B.E. Rollin and M.L. Kesel (eds.) The Experimental Animal in Biomedical Research, Volume I (Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1990).

e) B.E. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry, Chapters 5-7.

f) B.E. Rollin, “Animal research: A moral science” from European Molecular Biology Organization Reports.

Week 7: Animal research (cont.) The nature and functions of ACUC's and protocol review.
Readings:

a) NIH, Guide to the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. 8th ed, 2010. [Availability TBA]

b) Animal Welfare Act

c) Public Health Service Policy



Week 8: Pain and Ethics
Reading: Science and Ethics, Chapter 6

Weeks 9 and 10: The Nuts and Bolts of Professional Ethics.
Week 9: Expectations of Good Behavior. Data Acquisition and Ownership. Responsible Publication. Mentor/Mentee Relationships. (Guest, Kathy Partin, RICRO)
Readings:

a) Science and Ethics Chapter 10

b) On Being a Scientist: A Guide to Responsible Conduct in Research, National Academy of Sciences (2009)

c) Nicholas H. Steneck, “Office of Research Integrity Introduction to the Responsible Conduct of Research” (2007)


Week 10: Deception in Science. Dealing with Fraud
Readings:

a) Science and Ethics Chapter 10

b) W. Broad and N. Wade, "Deceit in History" (from Betrayers of the Truth)

c) R. Bell, Impure Science: Fraud, Compromise and Political Influence in Scientific Research.

d) B. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry, Chapter 4.

e) NIH Policy on Misconduct in Science (1989).

f) Association of American Universities, Framework for Institutional Policies and Procedures to Deal with Fraud in Research (1989).

g) CSU Policy on Misconduct in Science (2010).



Week 11: Biosafety issues.
Readings: NIH, Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (5th ed).

http://www.cdc.gov/biosafety/publications/BMBL_5th_Edition.pdf

Lecture By Dr. Gerald Callahan
Week 12. Collaborative Research. Conflicts of Interest.

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology


Reading: Science and Ethics, Chapter 6

Lecture by Dr. Shawn Archibeque




Week 12: Genetic Engineering (cont.)

Reading: Science and Ethics, Chapter 7



Week 13: Genetic Engineering (cont.),
Reading: Science and Ethics, Chapter 8

Week 14: Is Science anti-democratic?
Readings: P.K. Feyerabend, “Democracy, Elitism, and Scientific Method.”

Week 15: Conclusion, Prospects
Course Requirements:

The required books are:

B.E. Rollin, Science and Ethics (Cambridge University Press, 2006)

B.E. Rollin, The Unheeded Cry: Animal Consciousness, Animal Pain and Science (in Xeroxed package)



R. Bell, Impure Science (in Xeroxed package)
The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals is on line. Other readings will also be available in a photocopied packet.
Each student will be expected to do a 15-page paper on an ethical issue in science, due at the end of the semester. The topic should be cleared with me by the fourth week of class. (40% of the grade)
A final exam will be administered. (40% of the grade)
Each student will also be expected to make a full class presentation and lead a discussion on some topic relevant to the readings. (20% of the grade).
It is vital that you keep abreast of the readings so that the class can be genuinely interactive.





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